How to make your landing page so emotional it can't fail to convert!

by wordsandthebees 11 replies
OK so we all know that conveying some serious emotion converts, but we also know that a landing page only gives very limited space so it can be hard to get the right message across in such a short space.
As someone who writes and helps to design landing pages as part of my business, I've got a lot of experience in how to create emotion so that, in essence, it can't fail to convert.

If you're starting a new business and you're on a limited budget, you might find a few of these tips and tricks useful to get the most out of your landing page.

1) Use pictures.
So again, you probably know that images are super important in capturing attention and making people stop and look for more info.
Using images of people however is the key to actually invoking emotion. It might sound obvious but you know yourself that when you see someone laughing, you laugh; and if you see someone crying you feel sad too. For your landing page always choose an image of a person who is displaying the feelings that you want your audience to feel. So for example if you're selling a product or service aimed at a ladder-climbing corporate, use an image of someone who is evidently strong and confident. If you're trying to get donations for a fundraising campaign, use an image of someone who looks as though they're 'feeling' the problem of the cause. If you're selling a beauty product that makes someone feel confident, use an image of a man or woman without a care in the world.
This might sound too obvious to be true, but trust me it works!!

2) Use colour.
If you haven't already, it's worth doing research on how colours affect people's emotions. Often people go for the black and white landing page because it's clean and clear and easy to get your point across but using colour correctly can actually invoke emotion of your audience. For example using a green background or font makes a viewer feel calm and hopeful and red appeals to those who are passionate and energetic. Identify what you want your target market to feel, and then colour your landing page accordingly - there's lots of research online you just need to Google it.

3) Talk about benefits not features.
This applies in all areas of your marketing but on a landing page you only need one or two sentences to convert your ideal customer. Rather than talking about how fast your brand of car goes, talk about how much time it'll save it's new owner. Instead of talking about how delicious a good product is, talk about how it'll make family get-togethers easier or something similar! To be honest, nobody really cares about what you product does, they only care about what it can do for them. I've said it before and I'll say it again - humans are selfish creatures!

4) Create a problem.
Reminding your audience of a problem that they have, or indeed telling them something that they hadn't thought of creates emotional responses such as anger, agitation and impatience. Once these feelings have been experienced the person will then be in a hurry to solve the problem to get rid of the feelings. While it's not ideal to aim to make your target market feel angry, it's a great emotion to stir to make them buy. Again, with just a couple of sentences you can create a problem for them and then swoop in with the solution.

5) Emotional words.
Personally I'm not a fan of loading up your copy with emotional words as I think it looks fake and a bit tacky if not done correctly, but a few here and there is sometimes OK if done properly. You don't need to think too far out of the box here - Happy, Sad, Relaxed, Carefree, Delighted - some of my favourites that can all make the audience 'get it'

Hope that's of some help, I know that in the beginning I spent so long talking about my product and what it does, I didn't' actually focus on any of this at all which was really a missed opportunity!
Good luck
#conversion rate optimization #convert #emotional #fail #landing #make #page
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  • Profile picture of the author BlossMart
    When would you be using emotional converts? What sort of campaigns I mean.

    I am interested what you write for.

    I think imagery to stir up emotion is powerful.

    Think about the 40 Hour Famine imagery that is used in campaigns, the eyes of te starving child with flys all around their face... this can be done really well with a good CTA on a landing page.

    I also think that too much text is not needed. Creating a problem with a CTA that serves to provide a solution is really effective.
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    • Originally Posted by BlossMart View Post


      I also think that too much text is not needed. Creating a problem with a CTA that serves to provide a solution is really effective.
      Hi BlossMart.
      I disagree with you here, especially in fundraising campaigns.
      It's really important that you tell a story and build up a background of why you need someone to help, or the problem that you're trying to solve for them - you just can't do that with images alone and text is crucial.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10903236].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Ellen Chedid
    This is really insightful and different. Thank you for being so kind to share your knowledge.
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  • Profile picture of the author ivanadee
    That's a good share, my friend.The thing here is, we need something that make people feel like you talk to them or something that make people nod because they finally have someone that understand their situation.
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  • Profile picture of the author Dharmi
    According to me it does not have to be always emotional, it should be simple yet attractive. Colors can be chosen as per targeted niche.
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  • Profile picture of the author Andrea Taylor
    Choose a landing page template
    Give your landing page a name
    Add your unique content
    Add your stunning images
    Choose a relevant URL
    Make sure to have working links and CTAs
    Complete your meta-description and SEO title
    Publish!
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  • Profile picture of the author RogozRazvan
    Hello,

    Thank you for your post. It contains a lot of good nuggets. However, if I may add, you're taking the wrong approach. The power of the copy doesn't come from using emotional words or "creating a problem". It doesn't even come from using benefits instead of features.

    Instead, it comes from a few basic rules, that I'll write here.

    #1 - You can't create desire, you can leverage it. Amateurs copywriters always try to convince people that their product is something they should want. The problem is that while desire can be created, it is almost impossible to do so in a sales copy. Instead, you take the desire that is already there and you link your product, your solution with a hole that must be filled.

    Think of your prospect as a combination of wants and needs. The prospect is NOT going to buy what he needs, he's going to buy what he wants. That "want" is a minus. Your product is a plus. You must show exactly how your product gets him back to zero, to a state of happiness and satisfaction.

    Whatever your product is, it will fulfill some emotional needs. It can be greed. It can be lust. It can be peace of mind. But you don't try to create them. You leverage them.

    #2 - The copy is suited after the prospect, not the other way around. Amateurs copywriters try to use a cheap form of cold reading to get the prospect to say yes. Pros simply understand the prospect and treat the entire copy as a conversation between friends.

    If you want to write winning copy, it comes down to understanding exactly to whom you are writing. You must understand what keeps your prospect awake at night and what makes him happy. Congruency between your writing and your market is a LOT more important than the devices you're using to make your point.

    #3 - You don't create a problem. You leverage a problem. It has been said again and again but you can not scare someone into buying. The emotion of fear works only in connection to greed. You must have the carrot too if you want to use the stick.

    The prospect already has the problem that your product solves. He may not be aware of it, he may not be able to explain it in words but it is there. So the idea is to help him realize where he is as opposed to artificially creating need. After this point, you make him realize he needs your product (logical chain of reasoning) and that he wants your product (emotional chain).

    What I'm trying to say here is that the power of emotional copy comes only from your market. It doesn't matter how it is structured. It matters only if your prospect feels that:
    - you understand him and where he is right now.
    - you care about his problem, most likely because you've been there before.
    - you give him a rational justification for the purchase (the need part).
    - you give him an emotional argument for the purchase (the want part).
    - you prove behind a shadow of a doubt (or at least, in a reasonable manner), that everything you say is true.
    - you help him get what he wants, by connecting your benefits with his core wants.

    Pictures, color, case studies, all are great, don't get me wrong. However, people need to learn WHY these work, the SYSTEMS and PSYCHOLOGY behind them.

    Best regards,
    Razvan
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10908202].message }}
    • Originally Posted by RogozRazvan View Post

      Hello,

      Thank you for your post. It contains a lot of good nuggets. However, if I may add, you're taking the wrong approach. The power of the copy doesn't come from using emotional words or "creating a problem". It doesn't even come from using benefits instead of features.

      Instead, it comes from a few basic rules, that I'll write here.

      #1 - You can't create desire, you can leverage it. Amateurs copywriters always try to convince people that their product is something they should want. The problem is that while desire can be created, it is almost impossible to do so in a sales copy. Instead, you take the desire that is already there and you link your product, your solution with a hole that must be filled.

      Think of your prospect as a combination of wants and needs. The prospect is NOT going to buy what he needs, he's going to buy what he wants. That "want" is a minus. Your product is a plus. You must show exactly how your product gets him back to zero, to a state of happiness and satisfaction.

      Whatever your product is, it will fulfill some emotional needs. It can be greed. It can be lust. It can be peace of mind. But you don't try to create them. You leverage them.

      #2 - The copy is suited after the prospect, not the other way around. Amateurs copywriters try to use a cheap form of cold reading to get the prospect to say yes. Pros simply understand the prospect and treat the entire copy as a conversation between friends.

      If you want to write winning copy, it comes down to understanding exactly to whom you are writing. You must understand what keeps your prospect awake at night and what makes him happy. Congruency between your writing and your market is a LOT more important than the devices you're using to make your point.

      #3 - You don't create a problem. You leverage a problem. It has been said again and again but you can not scare someone into buying. The emotion of fear works only in connection to greed. You must have the carrot too if you want to use the stick.

      The prospect already has the problem that your product solves. He may not be aware of it, he may not be able to explain it in words but it is there. So the idea is to help him realize where he is as opposed to artificially creating need. After this point, you make him realize he needs your product (logical chain of reasoning) and that he wants your product (emotional chain).

      What I'm trying to say here is that the power of emotional copy comes only from your market. It doesn't matter how it is structured. It matters only if your prospect feels that:
      - you understand him and where he is right now.
      - you care about his problem, most likely because you've been there before.
      - you give him a rational justification for the purchase (the need part).
      - you give him an emotional argument for the purchase (the want part).
      - you prove behind a shadow of a doubt (or at least, in a reasonable manner), that everything you say is true.
      - you help him get what he wants, by connecting your benefits with his core wants.

      Pictures, color, case studies, all are great, don't get me wrong. However, people need to learn WHY these work, the SYSTEMS and PSYCHOLOGY behind them.

      Best regards,
      Razvan
      Hi Razvan,
      Thanks for your comments and time taken to respond.
      I agree wholeheartedly that you leverage on existing problems and apologise if this was misconstrued. Of course you can't create a problem for someone that doesn't exist but you can certainly tap into or 'leverage' in your words, problems that aren't sitting at the forefront of someone's mind.,
      I appreciate your response, very useful and insightful
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10911087].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author mbriel
    very interesting article, in regards to colors, its so true, colors has an effect on our emotions and its always good take this matter into consideration when designing your page.
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  • Profile picture of the author geldhost
    Instead of "create" (a problem), I think what you were trying to say was "obviate", i.e. to make obvious, a problem, or THE problem to them that they have. You bring that problem (or want) into the foreground and communicate that your product/service serves that want directly.

    Salesman mentor/buddy taught me that "obviating" bit. Sometimes the right concepts and language makes all the difference. You can't concretely think about anything if you don't know the terms accordingly.
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  • Profile picture of the author Usman Zia
    i am beginner in this field and don't know how to write effectively . you give me a good kick thanks for sharing you ideas .
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10991186].message }}
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