Is the Age of Copywriters Over?

by elmo033057 80 replies
Looks like Goldman Sachs is investing $30 Million into software that's already churning out copy that's better than human copywriters can.

Weve run 4,000 campaigns and our average uplift on conversion rates is 49.5%, Baciu boasted. That includes all types of messaging, from up-selling, to cross-selling, to (Im assuming) just selling."

Even though the developers are saying that they're 20 years away from blogs and longer articles, GS would not be investing 30 Million into the technology to just make short ads.

Anyway, you can read the good news here: Copywriter Software

Elmo
#copywriting #age #copywriters
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  • Gotta figure the mercurial always got the edge over the mechanical.

    Prolly whatcha got here is a super-sophisticated closed loop.

    Remember: Indy's whip only resembles a lasso when it is coiled at his side.

    (I do not know what that means, btw, but I am leavin' it here as a marker for 2037 jus' in case the super bloggo computer randomly quotes me.)
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  • Profile picture of the author GordonJ
    Originally Posted by elmo033057 View Post

    Looks like Goldman Sachs is investing $30 Million into software that's already churning out copy that's better than human copywriters can.

    Weve run 4,000 campaigns and our average uplift on conversion rates is 49.5%, Baciu boasted. That includes all types of messaging, from up-selling, to cross-selling, to (Im assuming) just selling."

    Even though the developers are saying that they're 20 years away from blogs and longer articles, GS would not be investing 30 Million into the technology to just make short ads.

    Anyway, you can read the good news here: Copywriter Software

    Elmo
    GS would not be investing 30 Million into the technology to just make short ads.

    HA, ha and ha. The biggest losers in history are the guys who look at what some stupid company like GS does with it's money and think:

    they must know what they are doing, right?

    HA (Enron)
    HA Tuzman, formerly of GS HA HA
    HA eXcite turned down google for 750k BIG HA
    HA TerrAlliance GS big loss
    HA Cerveva Networks GS bankrolled
    HA Goldman Sachs, the largest Welfare Recipient in US History

    yea, these guys know what the future holds...

    HA!

    GordonJ
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  • Profile picture of the author outscrape
    Decent content isn't hard to replicate at a very niche level. Try out the new age BS generator: http://sebpearce.com/bullshit/

    This is just a spinning program with nested synonyms and sentences.

    Replicating human-written text is one thing.

    http://www.npr.org/sections/money/20...-story-who-won

    Making it good, unique, or original is another.

    Copywriters might have to make a better case for themselves down the road, but in terms of taking in new information and spitting out content, the human brain will probably be the best machine for the job for our lifetimes.
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  • The most basic copywriting tasks--renew subscription emails, really short PPC ads, taglines--can probably be automated with AI based on current technology.

    Long form stuff, or anything advanced/cutting edge?

    I really doubt it. The article says that the app is based on the 'most commonly used phrases in digital marketing,' but high level copywriting is about writing something new that nobody has done before. I can't see AI doing that any time this decade.
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  • Profile picture of the author NewParadigm
    long term capital management and bernie madoff had magic unknown black box systems that guaranteed profits too
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  • Profile picture of the author RogozRazvan
    The threat to copywriters ... and copywriting as a profession doesn't come from this piece of software.

    Instead, it comes from three other directions:

    #1 - The change in delivery mediums. Direct mail evolved into web sales pages. These in turn evolved in video sales page. Up to this point, they were reliant on the power of the written word. However, with the advent of VR, there is a shift from copy to experience. Once technology allows us to touch, manipulate, experience the product, once dimensionalized benefits become 3D life like experiences, then some aspects of copywriting will become obsolete.

    #2 - The extremely low barrier to entry. Everyone is a copywriter now because copywriting is not regulated. If you claim that you know Java Script, there are ways to prove it. If you claim you are a designer, there are ways to prove it. However, most potential clients do not know the difference between good copy and bad copy and sophisticated buyers are a small crowd.

    For most clients, there is no objective standard to test someone's copywriting skill. Instead, they rely on how they subjectively like the copy and the writing style. However, I don't think many clients judge the copy using questions like "How effective it was the theme?" or "How many proof elements are used?".

    #3 - The shift in how sales are made. For almost a century, the system was simple. The lead received a sales letter. He read it. If he liked it, he bought. Now things are getting a bit more complicated. Most sales are done within a funnel. The offer matters more than it ever did before. In software application (ex: games), there are employed rather sophisticated cross-selling devices (like receiving 10.000 "gold" if you install a piece of software and you play up to a certain level).

    This means that while copywriting is important, technology is used more and more to make the sale.

    I don't think copywriting as a field will go extinct. However, I don't believe that the field of pure copywriting will remain alive either. I think it will get merged with marketing and CRO and a copywriter, instead of focusing on writing copy, he'll focus on generating conversion. He'll employ tools from writing to video to analytics to behavioral tracking to big data to help businesses sell.

    So not so far in the future, a copywriter will be a conversion specialist, combining several fields as opposed to a wordsmith.

    Best regards,
    Razvan
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    • Profile picture of the author elmo033057
      Rogoz,

      Man, you have really thought this through. I think you're right, things are going to change and probably become more complex. If you look at writing since the advent of the home computer, you'll see that there are many aspects of writing that have totally changed. We have all of those different mediums you spoke of and then some.

      Anyway, I couldn't say any better than you just did.

      Thanks for a great reply!

      Elmo
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    • Profile picture of the author cynthiaSEL
      Originally Posted by RogozRazvan View Post

      I don't think copywriting as a field will go extinct. However, I don't believe that the field of pure copywriting will remain alive either. I think it will get merged with marketing and CRO and a copywriter, instead of focusing on writing copy, he'll focus on generating conversion. He'll employ tools from writing to video to analytics to behavioral tracking to big data to help businesses sell.

      So not so far in the future, a copywriter will be a conversion specialist, combining several fields as opposed to a wordsmith.
      That is a good insight for what to do next as I learn! I need to pay special attention to noticing what converts in all aspects of business. Copywriters seem to be masters of taking attention and turning it into action.
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  • Profile picture of the author Courage
    You have to wonder if human
    beings would actually want to
    read blogs posts / articles or
    books which are written by computers?

    There is something extremely creepy
    and weird about the whole thing...

    One reason why people write and other
    people read what they write is the
    sense of human connection (If catch
    my drift)

    I mean Elmo let's not shit ourselves here,
    you've posted an article written from a press
    release which was put out by a company seeking
    investors...said company claims to have invented
    a miracle software which will allows you to shaft
    writers and increase your bottom line...

    If it happens it will happen but until then I'm
    not worried.
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    • Profile picture of the author manego90
      Originally Posted by Courage View Post

      You have to wonder if human
      beings would actually want to
      read blogs posts / articles or
      books which are written by computers?

      There is something extremely creepy
      and weird about the whole thing...

      One reason why people write and other
      people read what they write is the
      sense of human connection (If catch
      my drift)

      I mean Elmo let's not shit ourselves here,
      you've posted an article written from a press
      release which was put out by a company seeking
      investors...said company claims to have invented
      a miracle software which will allows you to shaft
      writers and increase your bottom line...

      If it happens it will happen but until then I'm
      not worried.
      If the market become saturated with copywriting from AI do you think the majority of people will move to blog post? As in the market for blog post would expand?
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      • Profile picture of the author elmo033057
        If the market become saturated with copywriting from AI do you think the majority of people will move to blog post? As in the market for blog post would expand?
        In the last 10 years I personally feel like I'm in a science fiction movie. You have the super computer, Watson, doing taxes for H&R block. I look around the cafeteria at work and see nothing but high school students playing with small computers called cell phones. Just 30 years ago, those computers were nothing but sheer fantasy in a novel.

        When I visit my relatives house and all I hear is "Lexi, tell me this - and Lexi tell me that."

        I would say that we are riding on the cusp of something real bad. That's just my gut feeling. We are getting way too dependent on technology. It may seem like we're being liberated, but I think we are being dehumanized a lot.

        And I also think the arts are going to eventually suffer horribly. Any kid with Photoshop can be a great artist. You don't have to spend years studying anatomy to draw like Frank Frazetta, just spend a few hours learning a graphics program and you can create a masterpiece better than the Death Dealer.

        Don't want to learn how to paint signs with a maul stick and a flat brush? Just buy a computer and a vinyl plotter and you're in the sign business.

        Want to compose a great piece of music? Just grab some decent software and use ready made templates to write music faster and better than Mozart.

        What? That's too hard?

        Just push a button and Watson can analyze every piece of music since the Baroque period to find the best melody, and form to compose with.

        And you should feel so talented because you pushed the button that told it to do so.

        Probably what will happen with writing is that you will be able to have a piece of software write material for you whether it's a blog post, article, or advertising copy. Not only that, you'll have another program interpret what was written and then tell you what it said and meant.

        You won't even have to read what it said and meant because Lexi will tell you verbally.

        So, there you have the future...At least until the lights go out.

        Elmo
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        • Profile picture of the author TrickyDick
          Originally Posted by elmo033057 View Post

          In the last 10 years I personally feel like I'm in a science fiction movie. You have the super computer, Watson, doing taxes for H&R block.
          You're grossly overstating what Watson does.... by writing, "the super computer, Watson, doing taxes for H&R block."

          A real human, a trained "Tax Pro," who enters your taxes, asks for documents, etc. is still required.

          There are many right ways to fill out a tax return. And the IRS will accept them all. But there's only one way that's best for you. Should you itemize your deductions? Should you file jointly? Your Tax Pro, armed with Watson, will guide you down the one path that is not only right, but right for your individual tax situation. So you get the most money back guaranteed.
          Source: H & R Block Web Site
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          • Profile picture of the author elmo033057
            Originally Posted by TrickyDick View Post

            You're grossly overstating what Watson does.... by writing, "the super computer, Watson, doing taxes for H&R block."

            A real human, a trained "Tax Pro," who enters your taxes, asks for documents, etc. is still required.



            Source: H & R Block Web Site
            Yeah, but all of this will be pointless when we become a cashless society. The gubba-ment will simply take your money out of your account digitally as you make it.

            Even Watson will become useless in the scheme of tax processing.

            Elmo
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            • Profile picture of the author TrickyDick
              Originally Posted by elmo033057 View Post

              Yeah, but all of this will be pointless when we become a cashless society. The gubba-ment will simply take your money out of your account digitally as you make it.

              Even Watson will become useless in the scheme of tax processing.

              Elmo
              Cashless society?

              I'd be interested in the income tax disappearing.... and have a sales tax only... on certain items... excluding the "necessities."

              It would take some tweaking... But, it would then "force" everyone to pay taxes.

              That is a discussion for another time.
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        • Profile picture of the author DGabeNJ
          Originally Posted by elmo033057 View Post

          In the last 10 years I personally feel like I'm in a science fiction movie. You have the super computer, Watson, doing taxes for H&R block. I look around the cafeteria at work and see nothing but high school students playing with small computers called cell phones. Just 30 years ago, those computers were nothing but sheer fantasy in a novel.

          When I visit my relatives house and all I hear is "Lexi, tell me this - and Lexi tell me that."

          I would say that we are riding on the cusp of something real bad. That's just my gut feeling. We are getting way too dependent on technology. It may seem like we're being liberated, but I think we are being dehumanized a lot.

          And I also think the arts are going to eventually suffer horribly. Any kid with Photoshop can be a great artist. You don't have to spend years studying anatomy to draw like Frank Frazetta, just spend a few hours learning a graphics program and you can create a masterpiece better than the Death Dealer.

          Don't want to learn how to paint signs with a maul stick and a flat brush? Just buy a computer and a vinyl plotter and you're in the sign business.

          Want to compose a great piece of music? Just grab some decent software and use ready made templates to write music faster and better than Mozart.

          What? That's too hard?

          Just push a button and Watson can analyze every piece of music since the Baroque period to find the best melody, and form to compose with.

          And you should feel so talented because you pushed the button that told it to do so.

          Probably what will happen with writing is that you will be able to have a piece of software write material for you whether it's a blog post, article, or advertising copy. Not only that, you'll have another program interpret what was written and then tell you what it said and meant.

          You won't even have to read what it said and meant because Lexi will tell you verbally.

          So, there you have the future...At least until the lights go out.

          Elmo
          We are liberated because the menial and trivial tasks that humans used to have to spend their lifetimes to complete (manufacturing, etc) can now be accomplished. Efficiency is the name of the game. We can now pursue passions and uniquely-human tasks more than ever (art will only flourish in my humble opinion). The things that AI is unable to do will be ever more valuable. There will be new forms of art (3D printing extravagant origami, etc.)

          It'll be a new frontier for sure but open arms will take us farther than a cynical perspective as we enter.
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  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    So not so far in the future, a copywriter will be a conversion specialist, combining several fields as opposed to a wordsmith.
    I'd say that happened some time ago. When I read "sales pages" I can usually identify what "point" is coming next because of the overused script outlines so many "copywriters" adhere to.

    Will be interesting, maybe, to see how far software produced copy can go....and whether only AI bots will be reading it in the future.
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  • Profile picture of the author marciayudkin
    Once technology allows us to touch, manipulate, experience the product, once dimensionalized benefits become 3D life like experiences, then some aspects of copywriting will become obsolete.
    This change will have very little impact on the need for copywriters.

    Most benefits are not experienceable.

    You can test drive a car, either really or virtually, and yet that tells you nothing about the safety ratings of the car, its guarantee, its customer satisfaction record and so many other essential points about the car. Words are needed for that. And who writes the words? Copywriters.

    In addition, the five senses have very little to do with the reasons we buy important things like insurance, coaching programs, even houses ("How good is the school system?" "What's the crime rate?" "What are the neighbors like?")

    So while your point has some validity, I don't believe it's cause for worry.

    Marcia Yudkin.
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  • Profile picture of the author yukon
    This is the direction I'm heading, been working on it for a while.

    My ultimate goal is to automate 100% of my content and make it as high quality as possible.

    I've ran several test and can completely automate building content at a rate of 4,320 units in a 24 hour time span from a single offline PC and then automatically upload to a site/host via the same Windows app with built in FTP.

    Still a work in progress as far as quality control of the product but I'm there, I'm doing it.
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  • Profile picture of the author RefuseToLose
    You want the good news or the bad news? Let's start with the bad news...

    This is a very real possibility.

    Copywriters think they are irreplaceable and are the be all end all of marketing.

    This A.I. stuff is most likely going to make copywriting obsolete for one very simple reason...

    The computer can test and learn from the results faster than any copywriter can.


    Think about it. If you gave this A.I. a niche like car insurance, had it take in all the top 100 well performing ads about car insurance and it spit out something to test in 5 minutes...

    They could monitor and analyze the test results directly through tracking software that learns and sees where people get 'hung up' or stop reading entirely.

    The A.I. then learns from this and adjust the copy accordingly and spits out something new.

    This process repeats until it creates something that has a really high engagement rate / conversion rate and it can do this non stop everyday.

    How many copywriters do you know can write new content everyday, analyze the data, LEARN from that data within a day, and create something new based on what they learned.

    I don't know of any copywriters that can do that.

    Although I think the next best people who can do that are the affiliate marketers who are running $100,000 a day campaigns everyday and track every aspect of their websites they can and alter words, phrases, and sections based on the data they get back.

    These are the human versions of this A.I. and these guys aren't even close to being 'pro' copywriters.

    That's what this A.I. software is doing.

    People here think copywriting is some kind of "magical" art that only we can write, because we are human and we understand humans...

    Yet in another sentence people talk about how dumb people are and you need to write like a 5th grader to get your content understood.

    A.I. replacement for copywriters is a real thing and I think it will happen sooner than you think, but I wouldn't say the success of it would be 100% because of how good this A.I. will write. It will be more of how effective an A.I. like this could alter, adjust, and analyze data at an extremely fast rate to perfect a sales message through trial and error.

    Copywriting has never been the key. Finding a way to analyze the results of what you write is the answer. Then you don't have to "guess" how your customers react to your content. You can measure results within days or even hours and plug in words or phrases until you hit a cord.

    Now the good news...

    This A.I. if it ever becomes good enough, it most likely won't be ever released to the public. It would be used by top companies to create their sales messages.

    So copywriters will still be a thing, but they won't be the masters of the sales world anymore. Just like the switch board operator. Copywriters will slowly be phased out by technology.
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    • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
      Originally Posted by RefuseToLose View Post


      Copywriters think they are irreplaceable and are the be all end all of marketing.
      This statement reeks of prejudice and envy.

      So copywriters will still be a thing, but they won't be the masters of the sales world anymore.
      And that will be a happy day for you, eh? LOL

      Alex
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    • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
      Originally Posted by RefuseToLose View Post

      Copywriters will slowly be phased out by technology.
      Did you use ai to write this?

      If so, it's not working because I don't buy its statement
      nor does Alex nor does others here.

      Back to the drawing board.

      Best,
      Ewen
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    • Profile picture of the author SARubin
      Originally Posted by RefuseToLose View Post


      The computer can test and learn from the results faster than any copywriter can.


      Think about it. If you gave this A.I. a niche like car insurance, had it take in all the top 100 well performing ads about car insurance and it spit out something to test in 5 minutes...

      They could monitor and analyze the test results directly through tracking software that learns and sees where people get 'hung up' or stop reading entirely.

      The A.I. then learns from this and adjust the copy accordingly and spits out something new.

      This process repeats until it creates something that has a really high engagement rate / conversion rate and it can do this non stop everyday.

      How many copywriters do you know can write new content everyday, analyze the data, LEARN from that data within a day, and create something new based on what they learned.

      I don't know of any copywriters that can do that.



      A.I. replacement for copywriters is a real thing and I think it will happen sooner than you think, but I wouldn't say the success of it would be 100% because of how good this A.I. will write. It will be more of how effective an A.I. like this could alter, adjust, and analyze data at an extremely fast rate to perfect a sales message through trial and error.

      Copywriting has never been the key. Finding a way to analyze the results of what you write is the answer. Then you don't have to "guess" how your customers react to your content. You can measure results within days or even hours and plug in words or phrases until you hit a cord.

      Now the good news...

      This A.I. if it ever becomes good enough, it most likely won't be ever released to the public. It would be used by top companies to create their sales messages.

      So copywriters will still be a thing, but they won't be the masters of the sales world anymore. Just like the switch board operator. Copywriters will slowly be phased out by technology.
      Alright, I was going to try and stay out of this, because the debate was turning a bit personal (and juvenile) but I just had to pipe up...

      A.I. might be able to analyze the results of copy extremely fast, but I still write a lot of magazine ads, and direct mail campaigns for clients. So even if the A.I. could analyze the results in two minutes, it still needs to wait until next month (for the magazine ad) before it can try again. And still needs to wait until some results come in (for direct mail) before trying again.

      So... Online I might have some A.I. competition; but offline, A.I. is just an expensive toy.

      And let's not forget about email marketing. If you start analyzing and re-sending me multiple emails, one after the other, you will get a response; but probably not the one you're hoping for. Instead, my response will be to unsubscribe from your list, and report you as a spammer.

      All that being said... I do think A.I. is a super cool technology that I would love to play with. But, it is expensive, so I better get back to writing some copy for my clients. (so I can afford to pay for some of this A.I. when it hits the market.)
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  • Profile picture of the author Nathan L
    I believe that the real threat to copywriters does not and will never come from an automated software or alogorithm, the real threat will always come from copywriters themselves. Yes! You heard that right. Copywriters become lazy and start to copy others. Now copying isn't all that bad. Many artists have done this over the ages. They were copying masters and then they created something brand new out of those. Great copywriters will always see something in a new way. Using the basics of great copy and then infusing it with tips from the great copywriters of our time. But when they go out and use sales letters of others and don't put their spin on it, then yes, copywriters are in trouble.
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  • Profile picture of the author elmo033057
    Now the good news...

    This A.I. if it ever becomes good enough, it most likely won't be ever released to the public. It would be used by top companies to create their sales messages.

    So copywriters will still be a thing, but they won't be the masters of the sales world anymore. Just like the switch board operator. Copywriters will slowly be phased out by technology.
    Unfortunately, the same thing was said about mathematicians that worked for NASA.

    Everyone can become obsolete in this new world. Sooner or later, the software will become cheaper, and everyone will be able to afford it.

    Back in the 60's and 70's when I was a kid, there were sign painters that made good money with their trade. You could make a lot of money painting signage and doing pin striping . Try to find a sign painter today that does it by hand. Anyone that could afford a vinyl plotter and a home computer can do signs and the market became saturated with vinyl plotter signage companies.

    One of my best friends was an awesome graphic artist that made excellent money designing characters and logos for companies. Today, he works for peanuts when he can get the work. Anyone can learn Photoshop pretty quickly.

    That's just the way it is and will be..unfortunately. Just about the only people that will be in demand are the high-end programmers and engineers. That is until Chappy can build a better Chappie unassisted.

    Elmo
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  • Profile picture of the author elmo033057
    Here are a few other articles of interest.

    The Watson computer that beat Ken Jennings on Jeopardy was tasked to write a movie trailer. Here are the results: Watson Writes Movie Trailer

    Also, computers are now writing articles for magazines and online news sites. Considering all of the writers that are graduating from higher institutions, as well as people that have studied that trade on their own, the field could get quite competitive and crowded.

    Here's the article on how computers are already writing articles for magazines. This technology is already affordable to most institutions and agencies. Magazine Article Written by Computer

    I guess we should all follow Ken Jennings' example when he got beat by Watson. The answer he wrote down when he couldn't answer the Final Jeopardy question was:

    "We all bow down to our new overlords and masters!"

    I'll see you guys later. Alexa just told me it was time to take out the trash.

    Elmo
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  • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
    The area I see Artificial Intelligence (AI) having the most problem with is hooks (in the case of written sales letters) and pattern interrupts (in the case of VSLs).

    They are too individualized to be effectively pre-programmed or pre-loaded into a database.

    And let's face it... the hook can make or break a sales letter's ability to convert.

    Alex
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    • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
      Originally Posted by Alex Cohen View Post

      The area I see Artificial Intelligence (AI) having the most problem with is hooks (in the case of written sales letters) and pattern interrupts (in the case of VSLs).

      They are too individualized to be effectively pre-programmed or pre-loaded into a database.

      And let's face it... the hook can make or break a sales letter's ability to convert.

      Alex
      My thoughts too, Alex.

      Take carpet cleaning for instance.

      The machine scans all known carpet cleaning ads.

      A common word in all of them is clean.

      So in search for commonalities
      it creates a mish-mash of the known.

      But what if the lady of the home is turned off as soon as she sees the word clean?

      She bases her whole decision on whether she thinks her carpets are clean or not.

      So that's as far as the machine can go.

      Enter a human brain who understands market message saturation
      and knows how to change the message so it's new and interesting
      to her.

      The end result is there are NO similarities to existing messages the machine can pick up,
      yet it sells the crap out of carpet cleaning!

      But how!

      The hidden terror of the dust mite does the trick!

      How could the machine think up the new category,
      Carpet Pest Eradication?

      And how can it discern when a message is saturated in a market
      even?

      I think we live in a golden age of technology,
      however there's still a place for brain power to beat the machine at times,
      but not all, as witnessed by IBM Watson beating quiz show entrants.

      Best,
      Ewen
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      • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
        Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

        My thoughts too, Alex.

        Take carpet cleaning for instance.

        The machine scans all known carpet cleaning ads.

        A common word in all of them is clean.

        So in search for commonalities
        it creates a mish-mash of the known.

        But what if the lady of the home is turned off as soon as she sees the word clean?

        She bases her whole decision on whether she thinks her carpets are clean or not.

        So that's as far as the machine can go.

        Enter a human brain who understands market message saturation
        and knows how to change the message so it's new and interesting
        to her.

        The end result is there are NO similarities to existing messages the machine can pick up,
        yet it sells the crap out of carpet cleaning!

        But how!

        The hidden terror of the dust mite does the trick!

        How could the machine think up the new category,
        Carpet Pest Eradication?

        And how can it discern when a message is saturated in a market
        even?

        I think we live in a golden age of technology,
        however there's still a place for brain power to beat the machine at times,
        but not all, as witnessed by IBM Watson beating quiz show entrants.

        Best,
        Ewen
        I've got to say Ewen, I've admired that dust mite hook of yours since I first saw it.

        To me it ranks right up there with Bud Weckesser's great hook, "Atlanta Housewife Investigated And Almost Arrested For Losing 73 Pounds".

        Alex
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        • Profile picture of the author yukon
          Originally Posted by Alex Cohen View Post

          I've got to say Ewen, I've admired that dust mite hook of yours since I first saw it.

          To me it ranks right up there with Bud Weckesser's great hook, "Atlanta Housewife Investigated And Almost Arrested For Losing 73 Pounds".

          Alex


          An algo can split test that one headline in the blink of an eye to cover the entire US based on traffic IPs and multiple demographics.
          • Atlanta Housewife Investigated And Almost Arrested For Losing 73 Pounds
          • Dallas Man Threatened And Almost Incarcerated For Losing 87 Pounds
          • Chicago Teacher Questioned And Almost Detained For Gaining 45 Pounds
          • New York College Dropout Scrutinized And Almost Apprehended For Losing 121 Pounds
          • etc...

          All you need is the seed ad copy and some data to spin.
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          • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
            Originally Posted by yukon View Post

            An algo can split test that one headline in the blink of an eye to cover the entire US based on traffic IPs and multiple demographics.
            • Atlanta Housewife Investigated And Almost Arrested For Losing 73 Pounds
            • Dallas Man Threatened And Almost Incarcerated For Losing 87 Pounds
            • Chicago Teacher Questioned And Almost Detained For Gaining 45 Pounds
            • New York College Dropout Scrutinized And Almost Apprehended For Losing 121 Pounds
            • etc...

            All you need is the seed ad copy and some data to spin.
            You miss the point. We're not talking about split testing.

            We're talking about artificial intelligence (AI). AI is way past IF THEN ELSE statements.
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            • Profile picture of the author yukon
              Originally Posted by Alex Cohen View Post

              You miss the point. We're not talking about split testing.

              We're talking about artificial intelligence (AI). AI is way past IF THEN ELSE statements.


              No, I didn't miss the point. There's no AI.

              There's IF Else, that's all.

              Nobody has a computer that can think. They have datasets and conditional code.

              This isn't The War of the Worlds.
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              • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
                Originally Posted by yukon View Post

                No, I didn't miss the point. There's no AI.

                There's IF Else, that's all.

                Nobody has a computer that can think. They have datasets and conditional code.

                This isn't The War of the Worlds.
                AI is not about a set of computer instructions. AI has the ability to "learn".

                A computer system that facilitates this learning is known as a Neural Network.

                Alex
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                • Profile picture of the author yukon
                  Originally Posted by Alex Cohen View Post

                  AI is not about a set of computer instructions. AI has the ability to "learn".

                  A computer system that facilitates this learning is known as a Neural Network.

                  Alex


                  No, it doesn't learn because real AI doesn't exist.

                  Everything is conditional code with parameters.

                  No computer woke up one morning and decided to learn how to drive a car or write ad copy.
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                  • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
                    Originally Posted by yukon View Post

                    No, it doesn't learn because real AI doesn't exist.

                    Everything is conditional code with parameters.

                    No computer woke up one morning and decided to learn how to drive a car or write ad copy.
                    Sounds like we're having a vocabulary disagreement... which is fine.

                    I agree with those who say that computers can be programmed to learn and evolve. And I'm comfortable calling that ability Artificial Intelligence.

                    But AI has its limits.

                    Human creativity (which has a direct link to Divine inspiration) cannot be duplicated by a computer.

                    Nor will computers take over the world as some claim. That's science fiction.

                    As to the point at hand, many of the functions performed by copywriters can and will be taken over by computers. But certainly not all.

                    Over and out...

                    Alex
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    • Profile picture of the author RefuseToLose
      Originally Posted by Alex Cohen View Post

      The area I see Artificial Intelligence (AI) having the most problem with is hooks (in the case of written sales letters) and pattern interrupts (in the case of VSLs).

      They are too individualized to be effectively pre-programmed or pre-loaded into a database.

      And let's face it... the hook can make or break a sales letter's ability to convert.

      Alex
      If thats the problem you see AI getting stuck on... well A.I. might be replacing copywriters sooner than I thought.

      I understand guys like you and ewen might be a little scared at the thought of an A.I. making your years of education and work almost pointless in the future... and it is pretty frightening.

      But let's be real...

      What you do is no different than what an A.I. can do...

      What do you do when you create a hook? You think of some unique way your product solves your customers problem. Most likely you're using some template you learned from some old copywriter and you just threw in some power words with your hook.

      Maybe because of your skill and experience you can put out a good hook using the research you did so that it connects with your customer "emotionally" because you're such an amazing copywriter that everything you write just brings everyone to their knees (tell me again why you aren't a billionaire or even a millionaire yet again?)

      The reality is even the greatest copywriters in the world write duds. The only way good copywriters are successful is they split test. Just because you 'think' you understand your customer doesn't mean they will react to what you write. Only split testing can tell you how good your copy is. And A.I. can do it faster and analyze the results better than you can.

      You can believe all you want that because you're human you will have some "deeper" connection to someone with your words... but words are words. And the only thing that matters is how the person on the other side is affected by them. And right now the technology to track and analyze that in real time is easier than ever to do...

      A copywriter might be able to produce a better out of the gate sales pitch, but an A.I. would be able to split test and give you better results faster than the copywriter can and eventually the AI will create something more engaging and profitable than any copywriter can over time.

      That's just the truth. Stick your head in the sand if you want, but there is nothing magical or amazing about what you do. You write words in a sequence that you think someone will read and be moved enough to take action. An AI can do the same thing, just a lot faster.
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      • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
        Originally Posted by RefuseToLose View Post

        I understand guys like you and ewen might be a little scared at the thought of an A.I. making your years of education and work almost pointless in the future... and it is pretty frightening.
        No, you don't understand. You assume.

        Fact is, I'm not the least bit scared. For a person with my mind, there's a lot of other ways to make money in this world.

        Originally Posted by RefuseToLose View Post

        Stick your head in the sand if you want, but there is nothing magical or amazing about what you do.
        And exactly what did I say in this thread that led you to believe I've stuck my head in the sand?

        I was a software developer for 30 years... and happen to agree with most of what you say.

        If you want to engage me in a meaningful conversation, make your points without making personal assumptions. It's scummy.

        Alex
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      • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
        Originally Posted by RefuseToLose View Post

        If thats the problem you see AI getting stuck on... well A.I. might be replacing copywriters sooner than I thought.

        I understand guys like you and ewen might be a little scared at the thought of an A.I. making your years of education and work almost pointless in the future... and it is pretty frightening.

        But let's be real...

        What you do is no different than what an A.I. can do...

        What do you do when you create a hook? You think of some unique way your product solves your customers problem. Most likely you're using some template you learned from some old copywriter and you just threw in some power words with your hook.

        Maybe because of your skill and experience you can put out a good hook using the research you did so that it connects with your customer "emotionally" because you're such an amazing copywriter that everything you write just brings everyone to their knees (tell me again why you aren't a billionaire or even a millionaire yet again?)

        The reality is even the greatest copywriters in the world write duds. The only way good copywriters are successful is they split test. Just because you 'think' you understand your customer doesn't mean they will react to what you write. Only split testing can tell you how good your copy is. And A.I. can do it faster and analyze the results better than you can.

        You can believe all you want that because you're human you will have some "deeper" connection to someone with your words... but words are words. And the only thing that matters is how the person on the other side is affected by them. And right now the technology to track and analyze that in real time is easier than ever to do...

        A copywriter might be able to produce a better out of the gate sales pitch, but an A.I. would be able to split test and give you better results faster than the copywriter can and eventually the AI will create something more engaging and profitable than any copywriter can over time.

        That's just the truth. Stick your head in the sand if you want, but there is nothing magical or amazing about what you do. You write words in a sequence that you think someone will read and be moved enough to take action. An AI can do the same thing, just a lot faster.
        The above narrative demonstrates a misunderstanding of how a hook is created.

        Yes, sometimes a hook is simply the unique benefit of a product. No problem for
        AI there.

        Other times, it's an idea that comes from the creative process within a copywriter's mind. And that's the rub for AI.

        The creative process is wonderfully unique to humans. Words are not just words... they express thoughts. So words can be put together in a gazillion different combinations without even coming close to duplicating the creative process.

        Alex
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  • Profile picture of the author RefuseToLose
    If you want to engage me in a meaningful conversation, come up with a real counter argument other than I hurt your feelings.

    It's a weak argument.
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    • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
      Originally Posted by RefuseToLose View Post

      If you want to engage me in a meaningful conversation, come up with a real counter argument other than I hurt your feelings.

      It's a weak argument.
      Address the issue.

      Are you capable of debating a topic without impugning the character of your opponent?
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  • Profile picture of the author RefuseToLose
    Originally Posted by Alex Cohen View Post

    The above narrative demonstrates a misunderstanding of how a hook is created.

    Yes, sometimes a hook is simply the unique benefit of a product. No problem for
    AI there.

    Other times, it's an idea that comes from the creative process within a copywriter's mind. And that's the rub for AI.

    The creative process is wonderfully unique to humans. Words are not just words... they express thoughts. So words can be put together in a gazillion different combinations without even coming close to duplicating the creative process.

    Alex


    The creative process?

    Didn't think I would hear a copywriter talk so highly of the 'creative process' considering almost every major copywriter doesn't believe in being 'creative'...

    Let's take a David Ogilvy quote for example:

    In the modern world of business, it is useless to be a creative, original thinker unless you can also sell what you create.
    So are you saying creativity is going to save copywriters now? The enemy of copywriters will be their savior?
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    • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
      Originally Posted by RefuseToLose View Post

      The creative process?

      Didn't think I would hear a copywriter talk so highly of the 'creative process' considering almost every major copywriter doesn't believe in being 'creative'...

      Let's take a David Ogilvy quote for example:



      So are you saying creativity is going to save copywriters now? The enemy of copywriters will be their savior?
      There's that assumption thing again. I've never said creativity is the enemy of copywriters. Nor do I believe it. Copywriting is both science and art.

      I stand by my statement: AI can't come close to duplicating the human creative process.
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  • Profile picture of the author RefuseToLose
    Alright we can meet in the middle. When these A.I. get here, you can be a professional hook creator for these A.I.

    It might be fun. Like writing headlines for buzzfeed.
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    • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
      Originally Posted by RefuseToLose View Post

      Alright we can meet in the middle. When these A.I. get here, you can be a professional hook creator for these A.I.

      It might be fun. Like writing headlines for buzzfeed.
      That's not so far-fetched. Headline writers for the National Enquirer are among the highest paid copywriters in the business.

      Alex
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      • Profile picture of the author RefuseToLose
        Originally Posted by Alex Cohen View Post

        That's not so far-fetched. Headline writers for the National Enquirer are among the highest paid copywriters in the business.

        Alex
        Looks like all the copywriting jobs of the future will be taken by these fat cats then huh. Can't imagine they need a lot of intermediate copywriters working with these A.I. machines.
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        • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
          Originally Posted by RefuseToLose View Post

          Looks like all the copywriting jobs of the future will be taken by these fat cats then huh. Can't imagine they need a lot of intermediate copywriters working with these A.I. machines.
          Nothing new.

          Even today if you want to make the big bucks in copywriting, you gotta raise your game. Either get real good a copywriting OR learn how to position yourself. LOL
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          • Profile picture of the author RefuseToLose
            Originally Posted by Alex Cohen View Post

            Nothing new.

            Even today if you want to make the big bucks in copywriting, you gotta raise your game. Either get real good a copywriting OR learn how to position yourself. LOL
            Interesting. Have you made the big bucks yet?
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  • Profile picture of the author yukon
    If you forget about the folks that write long enough to really look at what's going on, it gets interesting and it's not all the complicated how it works.

    Everything we do has rules... the same goes for algorithms.

    When you brush your teeth each morning you go through the same process day after day, it's repetitive. Copywriting also has repetitions. A copywriter will use buy words for instance, so you start with a single buy word and fill in the blanks depending on the demographic data. Once you have the results from Test-A the algo repeats with a mild change to the copy based on feedback and writes Test-B, and so on...

    This might seem like a long drawn out process but it's not when you run the algo. against a large batch of traffic. You can split test thousands of ad copy very fast while fine tuning along the way.

    Writers will eventually be replaced. It might not happen in our lifetimes but it will happen. Right now there's no real AI in the sense that a computer can think on it's own. There are however datasets that an algo. can use to create content.

    Here's a real world example of how Google trained it's Google Images algo., some of you might remember this... Google used humans (search traffic) to select plain text based on the image presented to them. Google ran this algo training for a few years back in the early 2000s. Now, in 2017 Google is using data to test humans with captcha solving (image below).

    This is how copywriters will put the last nail in their own coffins by generating data whether they know they're contributing or not.

    This happens all the time. When a large manufacturing business moves out of the US they'll usually send a group of employees who will eventually go through a layoff to train foreign workers how to do their job. Nail in the coffin.






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  • Profile picture of the author max5ty
    Been getting their newsletters for quite a while now.

    They say their content outperforms human-crafted messages 100% of the time.

    Something else I find interesting is their marketing. They're doing a great job of it. In 4 years they've gotten some of the best companies in the world.

    Here's a report I got last year from them where they talk about automated content...if anyone's interested in reading:

    http://lp.persado.com/rs/880-EHZ-626...rresterTLP.pdf

    They've got some other good reports on their website too.
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  • Profile picture of the author elmo033057
    One of the problems with AI taking over the jobs of writers in general is that the computers are getting smarter and the software more sophisticated. Within the next decade you will see more and more computers writing software programs themselves.

    It is kind of like a robot downloading several enginering degrees in a nano second and then building bettet robots. In the realm of computing, this is already possible and since computers never get tired, they can wtite more progrsms faster and better.

    When this phase is in full bloom the growth and availability will be explosive and anything digital will be fair game for nonhuman work.

    This will happen in the next decade or two.

    Elmo
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  • Profile picture of the author elmo033057
    Ray Kurzweil, big-time inventor and director of engineering at Google says human intelligence in computers is a mere 15 years away. By 2029 they will be able to easily write and read at human levels.

    He said that technologies expand exponentially. The Genome project was a perfect example of technology stating of slow and growing very quickly after the halfway point allowing them to finish in 15 years.
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  • Profile picture of the author johnbrent606
    No, copywriting never goes. Copywriting is very important, Nowadays, the internet has become a main target of copywriting, and a lot of effort is being devoted into online copywriting. Hence, it is necessary to understand the changing nature of copywriting.
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    • Profile picture of the author elmo033057
      Originally Posted by johnbrent606 View Post

      No, copywriting never goes. Copywriting is very important, Nowadays, the internet has become a main target of copywriting, and a lot of effort is being devoted into online copywriting. Hence, it is necessary to understand the changing nature of copywriting.
      I don't think the debate is whether copywriting will go away, but whether or not the copywriters themselves will become obsolete considering that Watson, Chappie and R2D2 can do it better, cheaper and faster than any human ever could.

      Can Software Write Better than Humans?

      Enjoy the future!

      Elmo
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  • Profile picture of the author ThePromotionalGuy
    Hellor elmo033057,

    Step back from the question.

    Look at the bigger control.

    There is no age of copy writers. There is only the marketplace.

    It is not whether copy writers stay or face replacement.

    History teaches, the marketplace is fluid. Change is constant.

    What's in today, is gone tomorrow.

    Old was new. New becomes old.

    Some will stay. Some will fall.

    Invention creates extinction.

    Chinchilla
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    • Profile picture of the author GordonJ
      Originally Posted by ThePromotionalGuy View Post

      Hellor elmo033057,

      Invention creates extinction.

      Chinchilla
      The machine has beaten man at poker. Today it has a list of everyone who calls themselves a copywriter. It has a pin on a virtual map,

      Today it writes copy. Tomorrow it sends the drone to eliminate competition. So will the copywriter become extinct? Bet on it. More to fear from AI than job replacement.

      GordonJ
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  • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
    In 1997, a computer beat the reigning world chess champion Gary Kasparov.

    If we call 1968 the start of the computer chess era, that means it took nearly 30 years for a computer to reach that point.

    (1968 was the year David Levy famously made his 1,250-pound bet that a computer couldn't beat him within 10 years.)

    A chess board has 32 pieces in play on a 64-square board. That represents an astronomical number of possibilities.

    Now think of how many words are in the English language that can be written on an unlimited sized page.

    Will it take computerized copywriting 29 years like it took computerized chess? Honestly, I expect it to take a lot longer.

    And as I wrote earlier in this thread, the areas of copywriting that require human creativity will never be surpassed by a computer.

    Alex
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    • Profile picture of the author RefuseToLose
      Originally Posted by Alex Cohen View Post

      In 1997, a computer beat the reigning world chess champion Gary Kasparov.

      If we call 1968 the start of the computer chess era, that means it took nearly 30 years for a computer to reach that point.

      (1968 was the year David Levy famously made his 1,250-pound bet that a computer couldn't beat him within 10 years.)

      A chess board has 32 pieces in play on a 64-square board. That represents an astronomical number of possibilities.

      Now think of how many words are in the English language that can be written on an unlimited sized page.

      Will it take computerized copywriting 29 years like it took computerized chess? Honestly, I expect it to take a lot longer.

      And as I wrote earlier in this thread, the areas of copywriting that require human creativity will never be surpassed by a computer.

      Alex
      We also have something called Moore's Law. Technology doubling every 18 months or so.

      Also comparing A.I. vs how long computers has been around is a flawed argument.

      For the past 30 years there was never really an A.I. limit. It was a hardware limit. You could only do so much on a machine that had limited hardware.

      Now that the hardware is getting more advanced, A.I. is becoming more of a reality.

      The idea behind A.I. is perfectly do-able. They just never really had the technology needed to pull it off.

      So it's not a matter of if, but when. And if Moore's law and current news is any indication... that 'when' is pretty soon.
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      • Profile picture of the author max5ty
        Originally Posted by RefuseToLose View Post

        We also have something called Moore's Law. Technology doubling every 18 months or so.

        Also comparing A.I. vs how long computers has been around is a flawed argument.

        For the past 30 years there was never really an A.I. limit. It was a hardware limit. You could only do so much on a machine that had limited hardware.

        Now that the hardware is getting more advanced, A.I. is becoming more of a reality.

        The idea behind A.I. is perfectly do-able. They just never really had the technology needed to pull it off.

        So it's not a matter of if, but when. And if Moore's law and current news is any indication... that 'when' is pretty soon.
        I enjoy your posts.

        I actually think you know what you're talking about.

        You make some good arguments.

        I also enjoy your blog.

        Thanks for commenting.
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      • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
        Originally Posted by RefuseToLose View Post

        We also have something called Moore's Law. Technology doubling every 18 months or so.

        Also comparing A.I. vs how long computers has been around is a flawed argument.

        For the past 30 years there was never really an A.I. limit. It was a hardware limit. You could only do so much on a machine that had limited hardware.

        Now that the hardware is getting more advanced, A.I. is becoming more of a reality.

        The idea behind A.I. is perfectly do-able. They just never really had the technology needed to pull it off.

        So it's not a matter of if, but when. And if Moore's law and current news is any indication... that 'when' is pretty soon.
        Not perfectly doable. But we've already been down that road.

        ♪ ♫ ♪
        You say potato and I say potahto
        You say sooner and I say later
        Potato, potahto, Sooner, later
        Let's call the whole thing off
        ♪ ♫ ♪

        Alex
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      • Profile picture of the author elmo033057
        Seth,

        Since you're not going to reply further, I guess it would be beyond asking exactly who the individuals are in the statement you made:

        "Everyone reading this can recognize passive aggression when they see it."

        Really???

        I laughed out loud when I read this. Honestly, nobody has told me this yet.

        But to be totally transparent and honest with you, my opinions are mere speculation. My son works in IT and he always reminds me that all of this "great technology" could stop in a blink of an eye.

        All that needs to happen is the electricity to shut down for a long enough period of time.

        Then we would have to rely on talent, not technology.

        But you have to admit, we are entering a very weird age. I've been a professional jazz trombonist since I was 18. I can tell you that the music industry has been impacted by software.

        However, I have loads of friends that are making good money still playing gigs. People enjoy a live performance and I don't think robots will be able to replace us THAT soon.

        As for copywriters, let's look at what we can do that software can't.

        Software can't advise clients on how to market their products or make important decisions.

        Software can't fix problems when things go wrong or assure a client that the path they are on is right or followed through.

        Software of this nature will still need to know what the parameters are of the assignment and what the products and services are for each client.

        So, hey you're right! There's a lot that human copywriters can do that software or AI can't.

        However, the days of being average may be over too. If a writer (and it really doesn't matter what the industry is) just bangs something out and turns it in while not offering some value to their clients or employers, then I think things are going to be tougher for them to get work.

        Hey, but if you're worried that AI might impact your copywriting business, don't worry. Elon Musk is working on creating a computer interface for you to plug your brain into.

        They are spending BILLIONS on this technology. The reason? To help humans to compete with Artificial Intelligence !!!! No kidding!!!

        Like I said in a previous post, the world has taken a turn for the surreal. Welcome to the 21st Century.



        God Bless, my friend!!!

        Elmo
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  • Profile picture of the author manego90
    I think it'll be really expensive for the majority of companies to use them. AI has the potential to profit the most of all products, in my opinion, because of how we live in a subscription base economy. The creators could charge at an enormously high rate per month for the use of their AI.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mariaparkar
    Banned
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    • Profile picture of the author elmo033057
      Originally Posted by Mariaparkar View Post

      The age of copywriters is not over. Originally, it is modified version of content writing with great success in the future.
      Actually, nobody will be safe when the computers and software gets more sophisticated.

      Even the programmers themselves will be replaced eventually. Computer scientists and programmers are trying to put themselves out of work.(Doesn't make any sense, does it?)

      Check it out here: AI Software Learns to Make AI Software

      "I have seen the enemy...And he is us!"
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  • Profile picture of the author DavePipitone
    Thanks for sharing this article - pretty amazing stuff.
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  • Profile picture of the author NewEnglandah
    A computer will never replace a person. You will always need the artistic creation.
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  • Profile picture of the author jessegilbert
    Interesting. I think you can accurately gauge the trends in AI for copywriting if you look at advanced artificial intelligence weaponry (for example: Autonomous nuclear drones) that some countries are producing.

    I think all of these will require human input and will never be automated, but surely you can get advantages with computational speed.

    Here is a relevant sample study:

    Average is Over!

    In a recent new your Times article The Pentagons Terminator Conundrum: Robots That Could Kill on Their Own the concept of computer assisted work shows how software can give unprecedented advantages


    In his 2013 book, Average Is Over, Tyler Cowen briefly mentioned how two average human chess players, working with three regular computers, were able to beat both human chess champions and chess-playing supercomputers.
    It was a revelation for Mr. Work. You could use the tactical ingenuity of the computer to improve the strategic ingenuity of the human, he said.

    Mr. Work believes a lesson learned in chess can be applied to the battlefield, and he envisions a military supercharged by artificial intelligence. Brilliant computers would transform ordinary commanders into master tacticians. American soldiers would effectively become superhuman, fighting alongside or even inside robots.

    (can similar technology turn mediocre copywriters into genuises?)

    NYTimes 10-26-2016
    Of the $18 billion the Pentagon is spending on new technologies, $3 billion has been set aside specifically for human-machine combat teaming over the next five years. It is a relatively small sum by Pentagon standards its annual budget is more than $500 billion but still a significant bet on technologies and a strategic concept that have yet to be proved in battle. NY Times
    Why is the Pentagon spending billions on AI technology?
    Because teams of human paired with computers can beat the competition on the battlefield.
    Do you think this technology might be applicable to writing and advertising?

    You betcha!
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    • Profile picture of the author elmo033057
      Jesse,

      That was killer insight, my friend. Yep, the world is quickly taking a turn for the surreal. Think of this. If you can upload a Phd. in engineering in seconds as well as several philosophy degrees, how long before these machines construct something far more sophisticated than even we could build? And at what point do these new forms of life realize they are beyond us?

      See Humans Need Not Apply
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  • Profile picture of the author Chetr
    Copywriting is over like oral sex is over.

    Someone had to write the stuff they put in the software.
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    • Profile picture of the author yukon
      Lol, at the butt hurt copywriter comments on this thread.





      Originally Posted by Chetr View Post

      Someone had to write the stuff they put in the software.
      Sure, that's exactly how it works and an algorithm eventually takes over from there analyzing CTRs, conversions, etc... to modify the sales copy thousands of times faster than any human. You end up with a database of proven sales copy that generates big money.

      See, the thing is, no human is taking into account for the little details in their sales copy. Think of how detailed the US Census is and the data they keep on file, now throw that type of data (public domain) into an algo. while it's split testing sales copy.

      Here's an example...

      A tornado hits a town in Arkansas, instantly feed that weather data into an algo. and it churns out thousands of PPC ads with Copy targeting a GEO location (ex: town in Arkansas) selling generators with same day shipping. Meanwhile the PPC ads/Copy are constantly making minor changes based on sales. That is extremely powerful.
      Signature
      Hi
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  • Profile picture of the author NCMediaInc
    Technology is great, but there will always be individuals and businesses who can't afford the technology, so original and custom copy will be a need.
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  • Profile picture of the author elmo033057
    News Writers,

    Here's a list of your potential competitors:

    Buzzbot
    Wibbitz
    News Tracerhttps://blogs.thomsonreuters.com/ans...s-news-tracer/
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  • Profile picture of the author sunnybunny
    Sooner or later we will come to the age, where all the copies will be written by machines. I am sure there still will be some place for human mind, while machines can not fully interpret all the feelings, so I am sure people will still have creative writers of different books, etc
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  • Profile picture of the author sethczerepak
    This topic floats back up on this forum from time to time. Like a turd floating swirling back to the surface after a good flush. It's garbage. As long as people are buying things, you'll be able to use words to persuade. Someone has to write those words. More important, a MIND has to be behind those words.

    You goons who think computers will replace copywriters don't get it You think copywriting is only about writing. It's not. Great copywriters aren't paid for their "pen." They're paid for their mind. Copywriting is only 10% writing. The other 90% is knowing WHY people buy.

    "One machine can do the work of 50 ordinary men. NO machine can do the work of one EXTRAORDINARY man." - Thomas Friggin' Edison

    PS: In case anyone is thinking about pulling the AI Argument, you might want to research Roger Penrose and Stuart Hammeroff's challenges to that stupid pseudoscientific "The Singularity will lead to consciousness computers," claim. I'd go there, but, since this isn't a physics forum...
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    • Profile picture of the author elmo033057
      There's been a lot of research done on this subject. Robots and AI are already impacting jobs. Here is a good example of data research that has been done on this subject: Yes, the robots will steal our jobs. And that’s fine

      And while you can make the argument that humans will still be able to out-write a computer, once the software becomes cheaper to do so, more companies will then be able to use it rather than hire a writer.

      Look at these gigs that have already taken the place of humans:

      Eye and knee surgery
      Manufacturing (Apple and Samsung supplier Foxconn replaced 60,000 employees with robots, and China's Everwin Precision Technology is in the process of replacing 90% of its factory workforce with automatons.)
      Selling (Nestle is already using technology to sell its products)
      Security (Knightscope's K5 robot is replacing guards in many businesses)
      Farming tasks (Japan is using robots to replace human workers to do digging, watering, etc.)
      Pharmacy Assistants are accurate computer/machines that are replacing humans in counting and dispersing medication.

      This list is could be rather extensive.

      As for writing, the death knell may sound faster for us than you think.

      U.S. tech company Narrative Science has already developed a natural language generator called Quill that can easily take raw data and convert it into reports and articles.

      We are quickly entering an age where only very sophisticated minds will survive,,,for a time. The only secure jobs will be in engineering and programming.

      Once you build a robot that can build a better robot and download a PhD in engineering and a Doctorate in programming, that process will be very easy to duplicate over and over, better and better.

      Oh, and those jobs will not be so secure either.

      Welcome to the 21st Century.

      Elmo
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      • Profile picture of the author sethczerepak
        Originally Posted by elmo033057 View Post

        There's been a lot of research done on this subject. Robots and AI are already impacting jobs. Here is a good example of data research that has been done on this subject: Yes, the robots will steal our jobs. And that’s fine

        And while you can make the argument that humans will still be able to out-write a computer, once the software becomes cheaper to do so, more companies will then be able to use it rather than hire a writer.

        Look at these gigs that have already taken the place of humans:

        Eye and knee surgery
        Manufacturing (Apple and Samsung supplier Foxconn replaced 60,000 employees with robots, and China's Everwin Precision Technology is in the process of replacing 90% of its factory workforce with automatons.)
        Selling (Nestle is already using technology to sell its products)
        Security (Knightscope's K5 robot is replacing guards in many businesses)
        Farming tasks (Japan is using robots to replace human workers to do digging, watering, etc.)
        Pharmacy Assistants are accurate computer/machines that are replacing humans in counting and dispersing medication.

        This list is could be rather extensive.

        As for writing, the death knell may sound faster for us than you think.

        U.S. tech company Narrative Science has already developed a natural language generator called Quill that can easily take raw data and convert it into reports and articles.

        We are quickly entering an age where only very sophisticated minds will survive,,,for a time. The only secure jobs will be in engineering and programming.

        Once you build a robot that can build a better robot and download a PhD in engineering and a Doctorate in programming, that process will be very easy to duplicate over and over, better and better.

        Oh, and those jobs will not be so secure either.

        Welcome to the 21st Century.

        Elmo
        First of all, you can knock of the condescending "Welcome to the 21rst Century" attitude. Everyone reading this can recognize passive aggression when they see it, and it's embarrassing to see a grown man doing it on a public forum.

        Second, do you really think you're some genius sage prophet and that the people responding to you DON'T know what Century it is or what's happening in the A.I. World? Several people have schooled you on the topic (including: marciayudkin, Courage, ewenmack, Alex Cohen, SARubin). Yet, you've repeatedly ignored the substance of their arguments and gone right on barfing the same points you started with, as if you hadn't been rebutted at all.

        That's called confirmation bias (or, "willful ignorance") by the way.

        Case in point, you obviously didn't bother to look up the work of Roger Penrose and Stuart Hammeroff who have exposed the limitations of A.I. You just whistled past that graveyard and rattled off a list of Red Herring factoids.

        Also, the points you're making about these other professions proves that you STILL don't understand what a copywriter does. Shame people like you get paid to do this. It's giving the entire industry a bad name. Thankfully, A.I. WILL eventually replace people like you. Just make sure you get my order right when I see you in the McDonald's drive thru.

        If you're interested in getting a clue on this subject (and saving the future of your copywriting "career"), go grab a copy of Stephen King's book "The Wastelands" from His Gunslinger series. Read the part where Eddie beats the A.I. personality "Blaine," in a riddle contest. You might have an aha moment about the difference between A.I. and a real human.

        Or, you know, you could just pretend I never said any of this and go on trying to sound smart as you've been doing since you started this thread. That said, this will be my last comment. People who don't bother to engage with people's arguments before responding aren't worth the time. You might as well be in front of the bathroom mirror having this conversation.

        Enjoy yourself.
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  • Profile picture of the author Marketing4life
    I tell you one thing. Good content will not be replicated by any kind of software for a long, long time. If ever. There is no such thing as pushing a button and getting quality content in seconds.
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  • Profile picture of the author elmo033057
    "Someone had to write the stuff they put in the software."

    You are correct, Yukon.

    However, the computers are also going to be writing programs very soon as well, and they can do it much faster than their human counterparts.

    Read it here: New Scientist - Computer with human-like learning will program itself.

    Elmo
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  • Profile picture of the author MineralMinds
    Copy will always fall back to people. Companies will invest and invest in this kind of thing but it will never diminish copywriters truely. There is a big market out there and not everyone is going to get behind tech that professes to do a human job better than humans do. Tech is way too mechanical for the subtleties of well-written copy. Hopefully it will stay that way too!
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