Is the Age of Copywriters Over?

by 69 replies
Looks like Goldman Sachs is investing $30 Million into software that's already churning out copy that's better than human copywriters can.

Weve run 4,000 campaigns and our average uplift on conversion rates is 49.5%, Baciu boasted. That includes all types of messaging, from up-selling, to cross-selling, to (Im assuming) just selling."

Even though the developers are saying that they're 20 years away from blogs and longer articles, GS would not be investing 30 Million into the technology to just make short ads.

Anyway, you can read the good news here: Copywriter Software

Elmo
#copywriting #age #copywriters
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  • Profile picture of the author Princess Balestra
    Gotta figure the mercurial always got the edge over the mechanical.

    Prolly whatcha got here is a super-sophisticated closed loop.

    Remember: Indy's whip only resembles a lasso when it is coiled at his side.

    (I do not know what that means, btw, but I am leavin' it here as a marker for 2037 jus' in case the super bloggo computer randomly quotes me.)
  • Profile picture of the author Geraldobaldoo5
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  • Profile picture of the author GordonJ
    Originally Posted by elmo033057 View Post

    Looks like Goldman Sachs is investing $30 Million into software that's already churning out copy that's better than human copywriters can.

    Weve run 4,000 campaigns and our average uplift on conversion rates is 49.5%, Baciu boasted. That includes all types of messaging, from up-selling, to cross-selling, to (Im assuming) just selling."

    Even though the developers are saying that they're 20 years away from blogs and longer articles, GS would not be investing 30 Million into the technology to just make short ads.

    Anyway, you can read the good news here: Copywriter Software

    Elmo
    GS would not be investing 30 Million into the technology to just make short ads.

    HA, ha and ha. The biggest losers in history are the guys who look at what some stupid company like GS does with it's money and think:

    they must know what they are doing, right?

    HA (Enron)
    HA Tuzman, formerly of GS HA HA
    HA eXcite turned down google for 750k BIG HA
    HA TerrAlliance GS big loss
    HA Cerveva Networks GS bankrolled
    HA Goldman Sachs, the largest Welfare Recipient in US History

    yea, these guys know what the future holds...

    HA!

    GordonJ
  • Profile picture of the author outscrape
    Decent content isn't hard to replicate at a very niche level. Try out the new age BS generator: http://sebpearce.com/bullshit/

    This is just a spinning program with nested synonyms and sentences.

    Replicating human-written text is one thing.

    http://www.npr.org/sections/money/20...-story-who-won

    Making it good, unique, or original is another.

    Copywriters might have to make a better case for themselves down the road, but in terms of taking in new information and spitting out content, the human brain will probably be the best machine for the job for our lifetimes.
  • Profile picture of the author RichBeck
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  • Profile picture of the author Theomars
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  • Profile picture of the author Acopywriter
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  • Profile picture of the author Andy The Copywriter
    The most basic copywriting tasks--renew subscription emails, really short PPC ads, taglines--can probably be automated with AI based on current technology.

    Long form stuff, or anything advanced/cutting edge?

    I really doubt it. The article says that the app is based on the 'most commonly used phrases in digital marketing,' but high level copywriting is about writing something new that nobody has done before. I can't see AI doing that any time this decade.
  • Profile picture of the author NewParadigm
    long term capital management and bernie madoff had magic unknown black box systems that guaranteed profits too
  • Profile picture of the author RogozRazvan
    The threat to copywriters ... and copywriting as a profession doesn't come from this piece of software.

    Instead, it comes from three other directions:

    #1 - The change in delivery mediums. Direct mail evolved into web sales pages. These in turn evolved in video sales page. Up to this point, they were reliant on the power of the written word. However, with the advent of VR, there is a shift from copy to experience. Once technology allows us to touch, manipulate, experience the product, once dimensionalized benefits become 3D life like experiences, then some aspects of copywriting will become obsolete.

    #2 - The extremely low barrier to entry. Everyone is a copywriter now because copywriting is not regulated. If you claim that you know Java Script, there are ways to prove it. If you claim you are a designer, there are ways to prove it. However, most potential clients do not know the difference between good copy and bad copy and sophisticated buyers are a small crowd.

    For most clients, there is no objective standard to test someone's copywriting skill. Instead, they rely on how they subjectively like the copy and the writing style. However, I don't think many clients judge the copy using questions like "How effective it was the theme?" or "How many proof elements are used?".

    #3 - The shift in how sales are made. For almost a century, the system was simple. The lead received a sales letter. He read it. If he liked it, he bought. Now things are getting a bit more complicated. Most sales are done within a funnel. The offer matters more than it ever did before. In software application (ex: games), there are employed rather sophisticated cross-selling devices (like receiving 10.000 "gold" if you install a piece of software and you play up to a certain level).

    This means that while copywriting is important, technology is used more and more to make the sale.

    I don't think copywriting as a field will go extinct. However, I don't believe that the field of pure copywriting will remain alive either. I think it will get merged with marketing and CRO and a copywriter, instead of focusing on writing copy, he'll focus on generating conversion. He'll employ tools from writing to video to analytics to behavioral tracking to big data to help businesses sell.

    So not so far in the future, a copywriter will be a conversion specialist, combining several fields as opposed to a wordsmith.

    Best regards,
    Razvan
    • Profile picture of the author elmo033057
      Rogoz,

      Man, you have really thought this through. I think you're right, things are going to change and probably become more complex. If you look at writing since the advent of the home computer, you'll see that there are many aspects of writing that have totally changed. We have all of those different mediums you spoke of and then some.

      Anyway, I couldn't say any better than you just did.

      Thanks for a great reply!

      Elmo
    • Profile picture of the author cynthiaSEL
      Originally Posted by RogozRazvan View Post

      I don't think copywriting as a field will go extinct. However, I don't believe that the field of pure copywriting will remain alive either. I think it will get merged with marketing and CRO and a copywriter, instead of focusing on writing copy, he'll focus on generating conversion. He'll employ tools from writing to video to analytics to behavioral tracking to big data to help businesses sell.

      So not so far in the future, a copywriter will be a conversion specialist, combining several fields as opposed to a wordsmith.
      That is a good insight for what to do next as I learn! I need to pay special attention to noticing what converts in all aspects of business. Copywriters seem to be masters of taking attention and turning it into action.
  • Profile picture of the author Courage
    You have to wonder if human
    beings would actually want to
    read blogs posts / articles or
    books which are written by computers?

    There is something extremely creepy
    and weird about the whole thing...

    One reason why people write and other
    people read what they write is the
    sense of human connection (If catch
    my drift)

    I mean Elmo let's not shit ourselves here,
    you've posted an article written from a press
    release which was put out by a company seeking
    investors...said company claims to have invented
    a miracle software which will allows you to shaft
    writers and increase your bottom line...

    If it happens it will happen but until then I'm
    not worried.
    • Profile picture of the author RogozRazvan
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    • Profile picture of the author manego90
      Originally Posted by Courage View Post

      You have to wonder if human
      beings would actually want to
      read blogs posts / articles or
      books which are written by computers?

      There is something extremely creepy
      and weird about the whole thing...

      One reason why people write and other
      people read what they write is the
      sense of human connection (If catch
      my drift)

      I mean Elmo let's not shit ourselves here,
      you've posted an article written from a press
      release which was put out by a company seeking
      investors...said company claims to have invented
      a miracle software which will allows you to shaft
      writers and increase your bottom line...

      If it happens it will happen but until then I'm
      not worried.
      If the market become saturated with copywriting from AI do you think the majority of people will move to blog post? As in the market for blog post would expand?
  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    So not so far in the future, a copywriter will be a conversion specialist, combining several fields as opposed to a wordsmith.
    I'd say that happened some time ago. When I read "sales pages" I can usually identify what "point" is coming next because of the overused script outlines so many "copywriters" adhere to.

    Will be interesting, maybe, to see how far software produced copy can go....and whether only AI bots will be reading it in the future.
  • Profile picture of the author marciayudkin
    Once technology allows us to touch, manipulate, experience the product, once dimensionalized benefits become 3D life like experiences, then some aspects of copywriting will become obsolete.
    This change will have very little impact on the need for copywriters.

    Most benefits are not experienceable.

    You can test drive a car, either really or virtually, and yet that tells you nothing about the safety ratings of the car, its guarantee, its customer satisfaction record and so many other essential points about the car. Words are needed for that. And who writes the words? Copywriters.

    In addition, the five senses have very little to do with the reasons we buy important things like insurance, coaching programs, even houses ("How good is the school system?" "What's the crime rate?" "What are the neighbors like?")

    So while your point has some validity, I don't believe it's cause for worry.

    Marcia Yudkin.
  • Profile picture of the author SeanSharpe
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  • Profile picture of the author yukon
    This is the direction I'm heading, been working on it for a while.

    My ultimate goal is to automate 100% of my content and make it as high quality as possible.

    I've ran several test and can completely automate building content at a rate of 4,320 units in a 24 hour time span from a single offline PC and then automatically upload to a site/host via the same Windows app with built in FTP.

    Still a work in progress as far as quality control of the product but I'm there, I'm doing it.
  • Profile picture of the author RefuseToLose
    You want the good news or the bad news? Let's start with the bad news...

    This is a very real possibility.

    Copywriters think they are irreplaceable and are the be all end all of marketing.

    This A.I. stuff is most likely going to make copywriting obsolete for one very simple reason...

    The computer can test and learn from the results faster than any copywriter can.


    Think about it. If you gave this A.I. a niche like car insurance, had it take in all the top 100 well performing ads about car insurance and it spit out something to test in 5 minutes...

    They could monitor and analyze the test results directly through tracking software that learns and sees where people get 'hung up' or stop reading entirely.

    The A.I. then learns from this and adjust the copy accordingly and spits out something new.

    This process repeats until it creates something that has a really high engagement rate / conversion rate and it can do this non stop everyday.

    How many copywriters do you know can write new content everyday, analyze the data, LEARN from that data within a day, and create something new based on what they learned.

    I don't know of any copywriters that can do that.

    Although I think the next best people who can do that are the affiliate marketers who are running $100,000 a day campaigns everyday and track every aspect of their websites they can and alter words, phrases, and sections based on the data they get back.

    These are the human versions of this A.I. and these guys aren't even close to being 'pro' copywriters.

    That's what this A.I. software is doing.

    People here think copywriting is some kind of "magical" art that only we can write, because we are human and we understand humans...

    Yet in another sentence people talk about how dumb people are and you need to write like a 5th grader to get your content understood.

    A.I. replacement for copywriters is a real thing and I think it will happen sooner than you think, but I wouldn't say the success of it would be 100% because of how good this A.I. will write. It will be more of how effective an A.I. like this could alter, adjust, and analyze data at an extremely fast rate to perfect a sales message through trial and error.

    Copywriting has never been the key. Finding a way to analyze the results of what you write is the answer. Then you don't have to "guess" how your customers react to your content. You can measure results within days or even hours and plug in words or phrases until you hit a cord.

    Now the good news...

    This A.I. if it ever becomes good enough, it most likely won't be ever released to the public. It would be used by top companies to create their sales messages.

    So copywriters will still be a thing, but they won't be the masters of the sales world anymore. Just like the switch board operator. Copywriters will slowly be phased out by technology.
    • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
      Originally Posted by RefuseToLose View Post


      Copywriters think they are irreplaceable and are the be all end all of marketing.
      This statement reeks of prejudice and envy.

      So copywriters will still be a thing, but they won't be the masters of the sales world anymore.
      And that will be a happy day for you, eh? LOL

      Alex
    • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
      Originally Posted by RefuseToLose View Post

      Copywriters will slowly be phased out by technology.
      Did you use ai to write this?

      If so, it's not working because I don't buy its statement
      nor does Alex nor does others here.

      Back to the drawing board.

      Best,
      Ewen
    • Profile picture of the author SARubin
      Originally Posted by RefuseToLose View Post


      The computer can test and learn from the results faster than any copywriter can.


      Think about it. If you gave this A.I. a niche like car insurance, had it take in all the top 100 well performing ads about car insurance and it spit out something to test in 5 minutes...

      They could monitor and analyze the test results directly through tracking software that learns and sees where people get 'hung up' or stop reading entirely.

      The A.I. then learns from this and adjust the copy accordingly and spits out something new.

      This process repeats until it creates something that has a really high engagement rate / conversion rate and it can do this non stop everyday.

      How many copywriters do you know can write new content everyday, analyze the data, LEARN from that data within a day, and create something new based on what they learned.

      I don't know of any copywriters that can do that.



      A.I. replacement for copywriters is a real thing and I think it will happen sooner than you think, but I wouldn't say the success of it would be 100% because of how good this A.I. will write. It will be more of how effective an A.I. like this could alter, adjust, and analyze data at an extremely fast rate to perfect a sales message through trial and error.

      Copywriting has never been the key. Finding a way to analyze the results of what you write is the answer. Then you don't have to "guess" how your customers react to your content. You can measure results within days or even hours and plug in words or phrases until you hit a cord.

      Now the good news...

      This A.I. if it ever becomes good enough, it most likely won't be ever released to the public. It would be used by top companies to create their sales messages.

      So copywriters will still be a thing, but they won't be the masters of the sales world anymore. Just like the switch board operator. Copywriters will slowly be phased out by technology.
      Alright, I was going to try and stay out of this, because the debate was turning a bit personal (and juvenile) but I just had to pipe up...

      A.I. might be able to analyze the results of copy extremely fast, but I still write a lot of magazine ads, and direct mail campaigns for clients. So even if the A.I. could analyze the results in two minutes, it still needs to wait until next month (for the magazine ad) before it can try again. And still needs to wait until some results come in (for direct mail) before trying again.

      So... Online I might have some A.I. competition; but offline, A.I. is just an expensive toy.

      And let's not forget about email marketing. If you start analyzing and re-sending me multiple emails, one after the other, you will get a response; but probably not the one you're hoping for. Instead, my response will be to unsubscribe from your list, and report you as a spammer.

      All that being said... I do think A.I. is a super cool technology that I would love to play with. But, it is expensive, so I better get back to writing some copy for my clients. (so I can afford to pay for some of this A.I. when it hits the market.)
  • Profile picture of the author Nathan L
    I believe that the real threat to copywriters does not and will never come from an automated software or alogorithm, the real threat will always come from copywriters themselves. Yes! You heard that right. Copywriters become lazy and start to copy others. Now copying isn't all that bad. Many artists have done this over the ages. They were copying masters and then they created something brand new out of those. Great copywriters will always see something in a new way. Using the basics of great copy and then infusing it with tips from the great copywriters of our time. But when they go out and use sales letters of others and don't put their spin on it, then yes, copywriters are in trouble.
  • Profile picture of the author elmo033057
    Now the good news...

    This A.I. if it ever becomes good enough, it most likely won't be ever released to the public. It would be used by top companies to create their sales messages.

    So copywriters will still be a thing, but they won't be the masters of the sales world anymore. Just like the switch board operator. Copywriters will slowly be phased out by technology.
    Unfortunately, the same thing was said about mathematicians that worked for NASA.

    Everyone can become obsolete in this new world. Sooner or later, the software will become cheaper, and everyone will be able to afford it.

    Back in the 60's and 70's when I was a kid, there were sign painters that made good money with their trade. You could make a lot of money painting signage and doing pin striping . Try to find a sign painter today that does it by hand. Anyone that could afford a vinyl plotter and a home computer can do signs and the market became saturated with vinyl plotter signage companies.

    One of my best friends was an awesome graphic artist that made excellent money designing characters and logos for companies. Today, he works for peanuts when he can get the work. Anyone can learn Photoshop pretty quickly.

    That's just the way it is and will be..unfortunately. Just about the only people that will be in demand are the high-end programmers and engineers. That is until Chappy can build a better Chappie unassisted.

    Elmo
  • Profile picture of the author Raymond Rowe
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  • Profile picture of the author elmo033057
    Here are a few other articles of interest.

    The Watson computer that beat Ken Jennings on Jeopardy was tasked to write a movie trailer. Here are the results: Watson Writes Movie Trailer

    Also, computers are now writing articles for magazines and online news sites. Considering all of the writers that are graduating from higher institutions, as well as people that have studied that trade on their own, the field could get quite competitive and crowded.

    Here's the article on how computers are already writing articles for magazines. This technology is already affordable to most institutions and agencies. Magazine Article Written by Computer

    I guess we should all follow Ken Jennings' example when he got beat by Watson. The answer he wrote down when he couldn't answer the Final Jeopardy question was:

    "We all bow down to our new overlords and masters!"

    I'll see you guys later. Alexa just told me it was time to take out the trash.

    Elmo

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