What is a "true" benefit?

by 20 replies
I'm having trouble fully explaining the benefits of some features from my product. For instance, one of the most important features will save the user money. But from reading stuff here, saving money is referred to as a "fake" benefit. Can someone help me distinguish between the two? Isn't saving money itself an emotional thing that everybody will like?


Another example that might help: say I made a device that would eliminate traffic entirely. The benefit would not necessarily be "eliminate traffic" but rather it would be "make businesses more accessible to people which helps increase their revenue, make driving a less frustrating experience.." etc, right?
#copywriting #benefit #true
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  • Profile picture of the author Andrew Gould
    Originally Posted by rennsport View Post

    But from reading stuff here, saving money is referred to as a "fake" benefit.
    Saving money is fine as a benefit.
  • Profile picture of the author DKCopywriter
    Saving money is a great benefit.

    The feature is a low price, the benefit is saving money.
  • Profile picture of the author outscrape
    In my mind it's more like -

    Feature - Lower cost

    Benefit - You have more money

    Better benefit - You have more money to buy the things in life that you need

    even better benefit - You have more money to pay for your kids to go to college, so they don't have to end up like you, scraping and saving for the rest of their lives just to afford to pay their rent.
  • Profile picture of the author DABK
    I'd say it's not 'fake' but overused. Or, maybe, used instead of other, more appropriate.

    I've seen copy that assumed that all I, the prospect, cared about was saving money. Yes, I wanted to save money, so did everyone else. But that was not the only thing. And, if everyone says their gadget/service will save me $37 dollars, saving $37 dollars is no longer a benefit.

    So, if I transfer my phone and internet to your company and you're going to save me $37 and give me faster internet, so I save time, while your competitors only save me $37, you win.

    You win even if they save me $37 and you only save me $12, if my videos download 10 seconds faster if I'm with your company.

    I speak to a lot of reps in a particular industry. I always ask them why I should use their company. 9 out of 10 tell me they've got better customer service, their company is fast. 5 out of 10 also tell me their company is easy to deal with.

    1 in 10 says the above plus something that gets attention. Not something spectacular, usually, just different. And that's all it takes, a benefit that others are not claiming to do, often a benefit/feature others offer but don't know they should mention.

    Originally Posted by rennsport View Post

    I'm having trouble fully explaining the benefits of some features from my product. For instance, one of the most important features will save the user money. But from reading stuff here, saving money is referred to as a "fake" benefit. Can someone help me distinguish between the two? Isn't saving money itself an emotional thing that everybody will like?


    Another example that might help: say I made a device that would eliminate traffic entirely. The benefit would not necessarily be "eliminate traffic" but rather it would be "make businesses more accessible to people which helps increase their revenue, make driving a less frustrating experience.." etc, right?
  • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
    Originally Posted by rennsport View Post

    I'm having trouble fully explaining the benefits of some features from my product. For instance, one of the most important features will save the user money. But from reading stuff here, saving money is referred to as a "fake" benefit. Can someone help me distinguish between the two? Isn't saving money itself an emotional thing that everybody will like?


    Another example that might help: say I made a device that would eliminate traffic entirely. The benefit would not necessarily be "eliminate traffic" but rather it would be "make businesses more accessible to people which helps increase their revenue, make driving a less frustrating experience.." etc, right?
    Here's a good way to look at it...

    Feature - What the product HAS
    Weak benefit - What the product DOES for the customer
    Strong benefit - What the product MEANS to the customer

    As an example, take a fictional weight loss product.

    The product has all natural ingredients - that's a feature
    The product helps the customer lose weight - that's a weak benefit
    The customer feels good about himself when he looks in the mirror - that's a strong benefit.

    The strong benefits are, of course, the most emotionally powerful.

    Alex
    • Profile picture of the author rennsport
      Originally Posted by Alex Cohen View Post

      Here's a good way to look at it...

      Feature - What the product HAS
      Weak benefit - What the product DOES for the customer
      Strong benefit - What the product MEANS to the customer

      As an example, take a fictional weight loss product.

      The product has all natural ingredients - that's a feature
      The product helps the customer lose weight - that's a weak benefit
      The customer feels good about himself when he looks in the mirror - that's a strong benefit.

      The strong benefits are, of course, the most emotionally powerful.

      Alex
      That's an interesting way of looking at it. Just to make sure I understand it correctly, can you review the example I am about to list? I'll use the hypothetical traffic issue again.

      Feature: Eliminate traffic.
      Weak Benefit: Improve mobility in the city/make businesses more accessible
      Strong benefit: Make driving to the city easier and less frustrating for residents so they can get to the city quicker, safer, and thus enjoy their activities sooner.

      Grammar probably isn't the best, but is it the right idea?


      Thanks to all for the replies. This has helped quite a bit.
    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by Alex Cohen View Post

      Here's a good way to look at it...

      Feature - What the product HAS
      Weak benefit - What the product DOES for the customer
      Strong benefit - What the product MEANS to the customer

      As an example, take a fictional weight loss product.

      The product has all natural ingredients - that's a feature
      The product helps the customer lose weight - that's a weak benefit
      The customer feels good about himself when he looks in the mirror - that's a strong benefit.

      The strong benefits are, of course, the most emotionally powerful.

      Alex
      Excellent.

      When I was taking a Sales training program 40 years ago, I heard this sequence, which I think applies well here.

      "You get..."
      "Which means that....."
      "And the real benefit to you is...."

      In other words,

      Here is what you get.
      Here is how that is to your advantage.
      Here is how that ultimately impacts your life.

      Strangely, this works much better when writing and reading copy, that it does with the spoken word. Much the same way as using Tom Hopkin's "tag ons" gets repetitive and loses its punch.

      Feature; New sports car.
      Advantage; You'll stand out from the crowd of other middle aged flabby guys with low self esteem.
      Benefit; Girls will start looking at you again, and you'll be fooled into thinking they are looking at you, and not just your car.
      True benefit; (that feeds the need) you increase your chances of getting sex.

      Sooooo the true benefit of a new sports car is...it's more likely that you'll get laid.
  • Profile picture of the author Andy The Copywriter
    As Alex said, what you're talking about here are more accurately described as "strong" and "weak" benefits. Calling weak benefits "fake" is a bit overboard; they aren't of ZERO value, they just don't have a massive emotional impact.

    You can think of a good benefit as a three-layered structure, with the bottom two layers supporting the one above it. At the bottom you have a feature, which is essentially a fact about the product; you need features because without them, benefits lack credibility. In the middle you have a weak benefit, which is a concrete result of using a product or service; weak benefits serve as a 'bridge' between a feature and a strong benefit. At the top you have a strong benefit, which is the positive emotion or experience the person will get from using the product.

    All of these should ideally be there.

    No feature, no credibility.

    No strong benefit, and you can only sell to people who already understand how the weak benefit will help them.

    No weak benefit, and the connection between the feature and the strong benefit won't be apparent.
  • Profile picture of the author colmodwyer
    This has stuck in my memory for years, as a great example of a "deeper benefit" -- "Makes your skin more kissable."

    From some skin cream ad.

    Colm
    • Profile picture of the author Princess Balestra
      Originally Posted by colmodwyer View Post

      This has stuck in my memory for years, as a great example of a "deeper benefit" -- "Makes your skin more kissable."

      From some skin cream ad.

      Colm
      Ha!

      Only problem is, you gotta rub it all over for 100% action.

      Gotta figure the "ooooh...he started on my toes, and moved up slowly to my [getchya thesaurus out while thinkin' dirty thoughts]" don't play so good if'n you fail to slap the MAKES YOUR SKIN MORE KISSABLE squirto creem on mebbe your kneecaps.

      An' I am thinkin' ants here, onya floor, kinda beelinea flightless communication suddenly snapped all busted by ragea sum bipolar tomcat breakin' the line.

      Gotta want this stuff available as an all-body spray.

      "Not a single square inch of your undeniable beauty
      will be denied the sweetest of Smoochie's lushest bounties."


      Thing is, I gotta visit Wal-Mart tamara.

      Not sure I wanna be universally kissable.

      Las' thing I crave when stockin' up on crap like frozen veg an' toilet de-viruser liquid is an onslaughta invasive tongues bustin' from outta the scenery tryin' to fill up my personal creviture with droola the frickin' lustoloonpants.
  • Profile picture of the author Ryany018
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  • Profile picture of the author uitechsol
    Save Money or time is the most over used and useless space covering sentence in any copy or Ad.I mean this sentence is enough to get on nerves because its too common and almost every business claims that.
    So its of No benefit at first place.
    The Selling line should be unique and Bold.Game of words is the perfect phrase i can use here.You should play with words and try to make the best possible selling line.
  • Profile picture of the author Mdshohidulislamrobin
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