What Types of Businesses/Industries Need the Most Copywriting?

by TeeJay19 15 replies
Hi Everyone,

I've recently taken the plunge and started a freelance copywriting business. I've started reaching out to various businesses, offering free copywriting advice in the hopes that it will lead to future work.

I'm just wondering, what are the best businesses to target? Should I be looking at small, medium or large businesses? What about industries? Are there particular industries that generally need more copywriting than other?

Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks!
#copywriting #businesses or industries #copywriting #types
Avatar of Unregistered
  • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
    A lot of it has to do with how good you are.

    If your copy skills are basic, your best bet is to target online solopreneurs. As your skills improve over time, you can then begin targeting more traditional clients... agencies and bigger companies.

    Three tips...

    1. Only target businesses that already know the value of direct response copy.
    2. Adopt a single lead generation strategy and stick with it.
    3. Consider creating and selling your own product. It will (1) give you visibility and (2) hopefully be successful so you can use the actual results in your marketing.

    Alex
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11008549].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author TeeJay19
      Originally Posted by Alex Cohen View Post

      A lot of it has to do with how good you are.

      If your copy skills are basic, your best bet is to target online solopreneurs. As your skills improve over time, you can then begin targeting more traditional clients... agencies and bigger companies.

      Three tips...

      1. Only target businesses that already know the value of direct response copy.
      2. Adopt a single lead generation strategy and stick with it.
      3. Consider creating and selling your own product. It will (1) give you visibility and (2) hopefully be successful so you can use the actual results in your marketing.

      Alex
      Hi Alex,

      Thanks you so much for your reply.

      Although I don't have any freelancing experience I've worked in the marketing industry for 5 years now. I've written copy for websites, brochures, catalogs, instruction manuals and more, so I'm fairly confident in my skills.

      I agree, I definitely want to focus on businesses that know the value of direct response copy. That's partly why I started this thread. I'm trying to figure out what businesses would best understand the value of a copywriter.

      My current lead generation tactic seems to be working alright so far. I already have one lead thus far. Nothing much, but it's a start.

      And I am in the process of working on my own product. I'm about halfway done at this point. Hopefully I'll be able to release it in a few months.

      Thanks for the advice!
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11008641].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
        Originally Posted by TeeJay19 View Post

        Hi Alex,

        Thanks you so much for your reply.

        Although I don't have any freelancing experience I've worked in the marketing industry for 5 years now. I've written copy for websites, brochures, catalogs, instruction manuals and more, so I'm fairly confident in my skills.

        I agree, I definitely want to focus on businesses that know the value of direct response copy. That's partly why I started this thread. I'm trying to figure out what businesses would best understand the value of a copywriter.

        My current lead generation tactic seems to be working alright so far. I already have one lead thus far. Nothing much, but it's a start.

        And I am in the process of working on my own product. I'm about halfway done at this point. Hopefully I'll be able to release it in a few months.

        Thanks for the advice!
        Sounds like you're on the right track.

        To answer your original question, the "big two" niches are health and financial. That said, there are plenty of other niches where billions of dollars are being spent.

        Specifically, products that are not commoditized. Relationships, Golf and Prepper come immediately to mind.

        Alex
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11009402].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author TeeJay19
          Originally Posted by Alex Cohen View Post

          Sounds like you're on the right track.

          To answer your original question, the "big two" niches are health and financial. That said, there are plenty of other niches where billions of dollars are being spent.

          Specifically, products that are not commoditized. Relationships, Golf and Prepper come immediately to mind.

          Alex
          Thanks again for the advice Alex. I've been targeting a lot of financial services, but hadn't thought about health. Great suggestion.
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11009405].message }}
          • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
            Originally Posted by TeeJay19 View Post

            Thanks again for the advice Alex. I've been targeting a lot of financial services, but hadn't thought about health. Great suggestion.
            Financial and health copy must meet certain regulatory guidelines, so be aware of them.

            I believe AWAI has courses that deal specifically with each, so you might want to look into them.

            One tip I didn't mention in my prior post was specialization...

            4. If possible, specialize in a niche that you're knowledgeable and passionate about. You'll reach the high-fee level much quicker than being a generalist.

            Alex
            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11009521].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author GordonJ
        Originally Posted by TeeJay19 View Post

        Hi Alex,

        Although I don't have any freelancing experience
        I've worked in the marketing industry for 5 years now.

        I've written copy for websites, brochures, catalogs, instruction manuals and more, FOR WHOM?

        I agree, I definitely want to focus on businesses that know the value of direct response copy. That's partly why I started this thread. I'm trying to figure out what businesses would best understand the value of a copywriter.

        My current lead generation tactic seems to be working alright so far. I already have one lead thus far. Nothing much, but it's a start.

        And I am in the process of working on my own product. I'm about halfway done at this point. Hopefully I'll be able to release it in a few months.

        Thanks for the advice!
        Well, if you have written brochures and catalogs, there was a product involved right? Five years of this kind of writing has put you in a lake where copy is needed, it seems to me (unless I'm missing something), you can launch your Freelance work via some of those companies you wrote for?? They surely understand the value of your work, just seems like a logical jump point, no?

        GordonJ
        Signature

        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11009517].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author TeeJay19
          Originally Posted by GordonJ View Post

          Well, if you have written brochures and catalogs, there was a product involved right? Five years of this kind of writing has put you in a lake where copy is needed, it seems to me (unless I'm missing something), you can launch your Freelance work via some of those companies you wrote for?? They surely understand the value of your work, just seems like a logical jump point, no?

          GordonJ
          Thanks for the reply Gordon. I worked on those projects while I was working for my former employers. One was a hydroponics wholesaler that sold a variety of indoor gardening products. The other was a company that owned a number of resorts and marinas.

          I suppose I could contact the indoor gardening company to see if they need any work done (I did some freelance work for them for a little while before I started working for my next employer) but quite frankly I don't like the people that run that company. It's why I left.

          My more recent employer laid me off because they're selling off a lot of their properties and are downsizing the company. Their need for copywriting has greatly decreased recently, which is one of the main reasons I was let go. So I doubt they would be interested in my services.

          I've made some connections locally though during my marketing career and will definitely try and take advantage of those as I attempt to launch my freelance business.
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11009659].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author michaelandy
    Well, it's a good idea to start copywriting business. Nowadays, it is on demand. So if your copy skills are good then you will surely get leads for your business. If you feel your copywriting skills are excellent then you should go for what you looking for.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11011532].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Diana S
    In terms of the businesses that need the most copywriting, I would suggest ones that go to the customer instead of having the customer come to them. Plumbers, locksmiths, mobile auto glass repair, etc. are,

    a. Particularly spammy, which means that legitimate professionals need good websites to help them stand out above the websites of unlicensed "pretenders."

    b. Very limited/boring occupations, and hence need a good copywriter to create copy that tells a story and (once again) helps them stand out.

    I hope this helps!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11014048].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author DABK
    Do you get junk mail?

    Keep it for a month or so. Then sort it by industry/niche.

    Do you read any newspapers? Sort their ads by industry/niche.

    The ones with the most ads would be a good bet.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11015126].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Mdshohidulislamrobin
    Banned
    As far as Ik they hire copywriters especially -
    Promotion and Promotion Agencies
    If there's any business that greets copy writers, both full-time and separate, it's ad organizations, because they create a wide range of selling advertising and ads. In-house copy writers usually manage high-profile tasks, such as journal ads, TV advertisements, and online shopping sites, while freelance workers manage low-profile tasks, such as mail, radio ads, and manual

    Public Interaction Firms
    Advertising and advertising companies closely related, often managed by the same company. Others are separate, sometimes expert in a particular industry, such as computers or medical care.

    Technical Composing Firms
    Not too many copy writers can dig through a load of blue printing or technological specifications and write clearly about such high-tech products as furnace pressure valves or data source store. That's why technological copy writers are always in demand. And that's why there are specific technological writing companies work with computer, application, and commercial companies to manage all the details of writing, modifying, generating, and printing guides and various technological journals.

    Graphic Style Firms
    Smaller graphics companies often seek separate copy writers. Larger companies hire full-time. Any sort of promotions that need design will also need copy.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11048073].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author salauddinbappi
    I think it's a good idea to start copywriting business but you will be skill about the copywriting business. At first you should be achieved how to increase a copywriting business than you can start your copywriting business. I hope you will be developed in this business.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11098526].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Stawrew
    Go to Clickbank.com; there you´ll find them.

    Basically, the big niches: relationships, weight loss, making money.

    Cheers,
    Kiril
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11106768].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Marketing4life
    Almost any type of business would need several good copywriters. If you are just starting out, try selling your services on Freelance websites. You will surely make a few good connections there. And later you can start promoting your services through your own websites that you can drive traffic to.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11133899].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
    Originally Posted by TeeJay19 View Post

    My more recent employer laid me off because they're selling off a lot of their properties and are downsizing the company. Their need for copywriting has greatly decreased recently, which is one of the main reasons I was let go. So I doubt they would be interested in my services.
    A company that laid off full-time employees like you may be very interested in hiring a freelancer like you. There's a big difference between keeping an employee (complete with benefits, insurance, etc.) and hiring someone to do a project as an independent contractor.

    Also, you said that company was selling off their properties. Think the new owners might need copy? Is it worth a phone call or email to find out?
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11141126].message }}
Avatar of Unregistered

Trending Topics