How Many Emails are Too Many Emails?

by 33 replies
I'll start by saying that, long before I incorporated email marketing into my own online marketing strategy, I was a subscriber to a few other people's lists on various topics. I remain a loyal subscriber to one of those lists, to this day, because it provides me with what I consider to be a reasonable amount of emails that always contain quality content. That reasonable amount of emails is, on average, three per week. Never more than that.

By contrast, I once subscribed to another list that I assume must have been created by an inexperienced affiliate marketer who was clearly more interested in building lists than in providing quality content. I say this because that individual started blasting me with emails--up to THREE PER DAY!--and automatically added me to other lists I hadn't subscribed to without my permission. I immediately unsubscribed from all the lists and marked the emails as spam, and I'll never join another list for that company's products/services again ... which is a real shame for that company because, up to then, I had viewed them as a reputable source of information on the topic. Not anymore.

When I started creating my own lists, I received advice that I should send one email per day that contains valuable content free of charge, interspersed with items for purchase only occasionally (like maybe once every three or four emails). I've been doing this and it seems to be working. No one has marked any of my emails as spam, and I've had only a 2% unsubscribe rate.

What are your thoughts? How much is too much? Or does that vary depending on the industry and topic matter?
#email marketing #affiliate marketing #email marketing #emails #subscribers
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  • Profile picture of the author DIABL0
    You need to test and figure out what frequency produces the most income for your specific list(s).

    Just keep an eye on your stats and they will tell you what is the correct frequency for your level of comfort of unsubscribes / complaints.

    If you are making more money, even if your opens / clickers start to drop off (due to higher sending frequency) only matters if your income also at some point starts to drop off.

    Typically you will find a point with increased frequency where you start to get diminished returns.

    Back off if anything starts to become excessive or you become uncomfortable.
  • Profile picture of the author Gary Chapple
    Yes, you should divide your lists, a simple question how often do you want to be emailed will tell you!!!!

    There are some that once a week is more than enough, in fact, that is my standard and I fill it full of information like a newsletter, that I often get complimented for my content. then perhaps once a month I will recommend/pitch an offer that I feel will be of great value to my list (and it needs to be bloody good for me to promote).

    I do not abuse my list I will pitch what I feel with several backup emails, but only to those I know will accept that. I know my list so well by questions and competitions, that I can practically guarantee a certain ROI.
  • Profile picture of the author Steve B
    The number of emails is not important because marketers have been very successful sending 1 email per month, in some cases, and 10 emails or more a day in other cases.

    It has nothing to do with you, the sender, and what you want . . . and everything to do with the receiver. What does he want? What will give him value? How often does he want to hear from you?

    I was once a member of a stock day trading service. They used to send me dozens of emails every trading day. Did I mind? Heck no . . . that's what I joined for - to get up-to-the-minute professional trading advice right now - not on the next scheduled emailing day.

    Email is not One-Size-Fits-All.
    • Give the customer value in every email.
    • Make sure his frequency expectations are understood.
    • Segment you lists to better cater to varying needs.
    • Build a relationship with your customers and be open to feedback.
    • Be respectful - don't waste the customer's time.
    • If you open rates are pathetic or declining, you're doing something wrong.
    Steve
    • Profile picture of the author wifiboos
      Steve has the right answer here. I couln't put it better so I'll just echo his bullet points here to emphasize his post summary...

      Email is not One-Size-Fits-All.
      Give the customer value in every email.
      Make sure his frequency expectations are understood.
      Segment you lists to better cater to varying needs.
      Build a relationship with your customers and be open to feedback.
      Be respectful - don't waste the customer's time.
      If you open rates are pathetic or declining, you're doing something wrong.
  • Profile picture of the author Happerz
    Nothing to do with the number. Focused on the wrong goal.

    Depends if you write crappy ones.

    If you write content people want they won't be able to get enough.

    Write great emails ppl will ask for more if you're not writing enough.
  • Profile picture of the author AlmaBelinda
    Like earlier said, it has nothing to do with the number.

    Make them active and verified mails, it's better if manually collected.

    Then you are good to go.
  • Profile picture of the author DABK
    Steve's right. If you gave me $100 with every email message I opened, I think I'd be up with more than one a day every day of the year, for years on end.

    If you offered me garbage once a month, you'd be sending me one message a month too many.
    • Profile picture of the author Best Seller
      Originally Posted by DABK View Post

      Steve's right. If you gave me $100 with every email message I opened, I think I'd be up with more than one a day every day of the year, for years on end.

      If you offered me garbage once a month, you'd be sending me one message a month too many.
      Very true!
  • Profile picture of the author oppyeaunome
    The only way to find out if anything works online is to try it and see what happens. The thing that happens to most people and what stops them from taking action online is they think too much about what they want to do instead of just doing. Less thinking more action.

    I say the best way for you to know what will happen is to try it with your email list. I'm a subscriber of a few lists and for me, I think if you're giving lots of value then your subscribers are more likely to open your emails.

    On the other hand, if you're just sending them emails with no value and you're just sending offer after offer then there is not reason for them to stay there. Any business you run whether online or off is about the value you give to your customers. Give them enormous amounts of value and they will continue to give you their money.

    Hope that helps.
  • Profile picture of the author OptedIn
    Whether you are sending me drek or prose, if you email me more than twice per week, I unsubscribe - especially if everything you send is a sales pitch.

    Thank you.
  • Profile picture of the author deepockets
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    • Profile picture of the author nicheblogger75
      Originally Posted by deepockets View Post

      Once a week max.
      Unless you have an ENORMOUS list that is INCREDIBLY responsive, you aren't going to get too far sending one email a week in today's climate.

      I'm subscribed to many major company lists like Safeway, Home Depot, Redbox, etc, and they often send at least one email per day, sometimes two.
  • Profile picture of the author Steve L
    Originally Posted by Best Seller View Post

    I'll start by saying that, long before I incorporated email marketing into my own online marketing strategy, I was a subscriber to a few other people's lists on various topics. I remain a loyal subscriber to one of those lists, to this day, because it provides me with what I consider to be a reasonable amount of emails that always contain quality content. That reasonable amount of emails is, on average, three per week. Never more than that.

    By contrast, I once subscribed to another list that I assume must have been created by an inexperienced affiliate marketer who was clearly more interested in building lists than in providing quality content. I say this because that individual started blasting me with emails--up to THREE PER DAY!--and automatically added me to other lists I hadn't subscribed to without my permission. I immediately unsubscribed from all the lists and marked the emails as spam, and I'll never join another list for that company's products/services again ... which is a real shame for that company because, up to then, I had viewed them as a reputable source of information on the topic. Not anymore.

    When I started creating my own lists, I received advice that I should send one email per day that contains valuable content free of charge, interspersed with items for purchase only occasionally (like maybe once every three or four emails). I've been doing this and it seems to be working. No one has marked any of my emails as spam, and I've had only a 2% unsubscribe rate.

    What are your thoughts? How much is too much? Or does that vary depending on the industry and topic matter?
    I think regardless if it's free content you're sending or an offer, your aim should be to deliver value to the customer. So long as that's the case, I don't think you can go wrong. One email a day I think is a little excessive but if it works for you then keep doing it!!
  • Profile picture of the author nicheblogger75
    It all depends on what you want to do. The two basic camps are "relationship building" and "churn & burn." Both work well.

    Personally, I think the whole "relationship building" thing is a thing of the past. I send 2-3 emails per day sometimes and it works great for me.

    Instead of including links directly to a sales page all the time, I switch it up and send some links to my blog reviews and pre-sell/bonus pages that I set up.

    I'm not going to mention any names, but I know a really well-known marketer who is making 7 figures a year, and he told me outright that it's a waste of time to try and build relationships with people.

    He also said never be afraid to sell because the whole point is to make money, and anyone who says they are in it solely to "help other people" is "full of shit."

    Do I agree with his outlook? Well, not 100%, but I damn sure listen to him when he gives me advice.

    I'll tell what is working like gangbusters these days, and that is advertising disguised as content. Have you ever clicked on a native ad?

    You usually end up on a decent piece of content that is super effective at selling a product. I think that's the future of email marketing.

    Native ads are absolutely HUGE, and only getting bigger. Some marketers are claiming a 20% -30% increase in CTR through native advertising.

    If you can effectively apply the whole "content as advertising" method to your email marketing, you'll definitely make bank.

    To answer the OP's question, though, I don't think there is a correct answer. It's different for every marketer and every niche.
    • Profile picture of the author David Johnson0
      Thank you for telling me this, I have a very large list of emails that I acquired. And it seems that on STM (Stack that Money) that I'm a member of, only a few individuals seem to know about email marketing and buying lists and using large lists. Most seem to want you to grow your list organically aka opt-in and take the slow and steady route. Don't get me wrong on the site they have had a lot and still do stuff that helped in affiliate marketing, but it seems that many of the big guys seem to be sand bagging email marketing.

      I think as a few said on STM and even said on warrior forum, the money is in the list and email marketing works. If you don't believe those people look at this article I will post. Meredith Corp sends out 450 million emails a month. If email doesn't work why waste the time? Or they know it works and don't want others to get into the business. You see it must be something to it when they are always asking for your email for any affiliate whatever.

      http://marketingland.com/kraft-mered...s-email-118166
  • Profile picture of the author Perch david
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  • Profile picture of the author Jonathan 2.0
    Re: How Many Emails are Too Many Emails?
    Stop at the point where you're annoying/irritating your Subscribers. Something else to consider is the "value" of your eMails. If you're providing great advice/value they will be more likely to be a trusted Subscriber.

    Treat your Subscribers with respect and you will be more likely to build a good "asset."

    (JMO)
    Jonathan
  • Profile picture of the author Reed Floren
    I've done the mailing every other hours (12 times a day before) you can make a ton of money but burn through a list fast.

    2-4 emails a day seems to work best for me.

    If I don't mail I don't make money

    If someone unsubscribes or complains there's always 10 more who can take their place.

    Churn and Burn + Relationship Building as a hybrid works well.

    Churn and burn by adding leads rapidly and mailing aggressively. Building a relationship by providing value such as a review or bonus, something special that makes them follow you.

    Don't be afraid to interject some personality into your emails too and share your story.
    • Profile picture of the author Best Seller
      Originally Posted by Reed Floren View Post

      Churn and Burn + Relationship Building as a hybrid works well.
      Isn't this a bit of a contradiction? You're either having a relationship or you're having a one night stand. You can't have both.
    • Profile picture of the author nicheblogger75
      Originally Posted by Reed Floren View Post

      I've done the mailing every other hours (12 times a day before) you can make a ton of money but burn through a list fast.

      2-4 emails a day seems to work best for me.

      If I don't mail I don't make money

      If someone unsubscribes or complains there's always 10 more who can take their place.

      Churn and Burn + Relationship Building as a hybrid works well.

      Churn and burn by adding leads rapidly and mailing aggressively. Building a relationship by providing value such as a review or bonus, something special that makes them follow you.

      Don't be afraid to interject some personality into your emails too and share your story.
      I'm with you 100%.

      A lot of people who are not in the "make money online" niche will think this is crazy, but those of us who are in it and are successful affiliates know this is pretty much the norm.

      A lot of people won't admit it because they are afraid of getting bashed in forums and they think somehow their reputation will be ruined.

      I have been building my list since 2008 and have managed to develop a mixture of churn & burn and relationship building that is working great for me.

      Yes, it is definitely possible to do both.

      You can send out frequently, but as long as your emails have some substance and are not just one or two sentences then you'll be fine.

      I also don't send my subscribers to sales pages in every email. It's about 50/50. I will send subscribers directly to a sales page if I see that the product I'm promoting has a high conversion rate and CPC. That means the sales page is converting really well, so there's no need for a review/pre-sell/bonus page.

      With other products, I will send them to a review on my blog or maybe even another piece of related content.

      I hardly ever use the whole "bonus" strategy, because I tried it in the past and noticed that it only improved my sales by about 1%. In my opinion, it's just not worth it to take the time to offer all kinds of bonus products in an attempt to entice the subscriber to buy the product.

      IMO, if the product isn't good enough to sell on it's own merit, then it's not something that I'm going to promote in the first place.

      I will use bonus pages sometimes if the product vendor provides one for their affiliates. Since it's simply a matter of adding in my affiliate link and uploading the files via FTP, then it's worth my time.

      Reed is 100% on point when he says there's no point in having a list unless you are going to market to them.

      As I said earlier, I got friendly with a well known 7-figure marketer on Facebook a while back, and I was fortunate enough to benefit from a lot of tips and advice from him, and he actually said the same thing Reed is saying. An email list is to email, period. If you are not going to market to them on a regular basis, then there is no point in building a list, especially if you are paying for traffic.

      At the risk of sounding like a jerk, the point is to sell products and make money. Yes, helping people is great, and it's important, and it's what ethical marketers should be doing. In the back of your mind, though, you should always be making sure that whatever time and effort you put into your business is to achieve one purpose and one purpose only-to increase your bottom line.
  • Profile picture of the author unlimitedoptions
    Sending one email each day with perhaps one day off over the weekend should be good. Anything more than one email per day will probably be overkill.
    As long as you are providing value or helping people then they shouldn't mind.
    When you start to send emails that are only about selling products then you may get into trouble and start to burn out your list.

    Dan
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    • Profile picture of the author Exynos
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      I am looking for online job if anyone need my help please let me know xfotech1 gmail
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  • Profile picture of the author Rod Delapaz
    Hey, what's up? I like your post here, very thoughtful question about frequency.

    Here's the thing. I set expectations from the very first email.

    I tell them who I am, what kind of emails I will be sending (free content, motivational stories, and offers), and how often to expect them. I send every day, with the occasional broadcast message announcing a webinar or limited time offer product.

    See, the reality is, I'm not emailing them to become a friend. I am there to establish a "business relationship" with them, and as a "professional resource".

    Based on that premise, I will typically not break that "trust".

    Hope that gets some thoughts going for you!

    Rod
    • Profile picture of the author Best Seller
      Originally Posted by Rod Delapaz View Post

      I tell them who I am, what kind of emails I will be sending (free content, motivational stories, and offers), and how often to expect them. I send every day, with the occasional broadcast message announcing a webinar or limited time offer product.
      I do the same. I think that's a good idea. Set up the expectations right from the start.
  • Profile picture of the author ZachMiller
    It's all about setting EXPECTATIONS up front..

    I actually do what you talked about "3 emails a day".. but here's the catch..

    I tell you I'm gonna contact you that many times a day for 10 days..

    And I don't pitch you on my product till Day 5 [and 1x every 2 days after that]..

    Those 3 emails are all in regards to ONE IDEA you are to do.. they are usually 5-10 minute tasks..

    I've found people will do ONE TASK per EMAIL more than multiple in 1 email..

    I guess the idea is.. FOCUS..

    In either case, if expectations are not set, up front, it can cause A LOT of issues for subscribers..

    Each email needs to offer value OR a "next micro step" forward..

    If we as marketers keep thinking from the "dream subscriber's POV".. we'll make emails that talk to the individual.. rather than the list..

    And THAT IS OK!

    We aren't here to please everyone! We want polarity.. because that makes you attractive (more money) to some and disgusting (unsubscriber) to others..

    In the end.. honesty and being your true self works best.. people feel it over time..

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