by 28 comments


  1. Title:
  2. Reason for Editing:

Last edited by {{ post.edit_log.username }} on {{ post.edit_log.dateline | date:'MMMM dd, yyyy'}} at {{ post.edit_log.dateline | date:'hh:mm a' }}. Reason: {{ post.edit_log.reason }}
#internet marketing #builder #mac #website

  • Profile picture of the author Jared Alberghini
    Adobe Dreamweaver is the best & most powerful IMO... other than that, Notepad.

    - Jared
  • Profile picture of the author tomw
    Obviously Adobe Dreamweaver is the way to go. But other than Adobe DW, the best out of the box website builder is Rapidweaver. It has countless themes, like Wordpress and a vibrant community of third party developers that produce countless usefull plugins, scripts and snippets.

    It does one click form pages, image galleries, video galleries, flash galleries and has lightbox built in. It does the lot...even one click uploads after configuration with your hosting details. If you know your way around some simple code then its pretty easy to customise too as you can work directly with html in the program and PHP in the templates...if you need to. But few people find the need.

    It also has a pretty cool built in non database dependent blog. It's just a great program all round really if you don't want to get into the technicalities of DW.

    They also have a free trial period so you can test it out.

    Thomas
  • Profile picture of the author davemiz
    dreamweaver.
  • Profile picture of the author indexphp
    You really don't need Dreamweaver. Yea... it's got some nice bells and whistles but you could just as easily use NVU (a free WYSIWYG editor)... or code it by hand in TextEdit.

    If you want to learn a little bit about coding and website design... just PM me and I can teach you some stuff.

    I know what it's like to pound your forehead with a ball pin hammer with some of this stuff, so that is why I am offering to help.
  • Profile picture of the author Josh Anderson
    A lot of people love Rapidweaver for mac:

    RapidWeaver 4 - Powerful Web Design Software for Mac OS X
  • Profile picture of the author davemiz
    they're all good.... but they're just tools.... obviously it depends on the person using the tool. If you asked for the best software tool? hands down dreamweaver.
  • Profile picture of the author Steve Steinitz
    Dreamweaver is nice for organizing lots of web projects and uploading changes but as a programmer's editor it has some exasperating ommisions and barnacles. For example, typing command-F doesn't always select the find field for immediate editing, requiring an extra click or two. Also, I haven't been able to permanently disable the _notes folders and they end up on the website. And the exclusion has problems which I can't bring to mind at the moment.

    In summary, it has some nice features but it feels unfinished and not up to the standards of other Mac software.
  • Profile picture of the author ShelbyC
    I was in the same dilemma a while back looking for some good website design software for the Mac. Rapid Weaver is really your first choice but you should try it out before you purchase it, I didn't like it that much as it seemed kind of limited in scope.

    I ended up running XsitePro2 with VMWare Fusion. I haven't had any trouble yet, but that's the only thing I run in Windows. The websites it creates aren't as flashy as some - Rapidweaver included, but they get ranked very high and very quick.

    Plus a lot of Marketing programs are Windows only right now so if you ever want to run them you can.

    Just my 2 cents...
  • Profile picture of the author Sean Donahoe
    Just to throw my 2 cents into the ring, I just switched to the mac recently and have been an ardent advocate of Dreamweaver. I have used many HTML editors over the years and Dreamweaver was by far the best. However, I have to change that after using RapidWeaver, it does a fantastic job and it can be as simple or as complex as you want it to be.

    For the Mac users it is a far cheaper option and has everything that a high-end commercial package like Dreamweaver provides and is far more user friendly, even for a geek like me.

    I have used NVU and its subsequent replacement Kompozer, and while it does do the job it is acutally generates very sloppy code and has some serious bugs (I got tired of having to fix simple code by hand).

    Often times it is a matter of personal preference and your level of web design experience. However, for new designers and old hands alike I really do think RapidWeaver is an ideal solution.

    Regards,

    Sean Donahoe
    The Manic Marketer
  • Profile picture of the author jonathanparham
    Originally Posted by Sean Donahoe View Post

    Just to throw my 2 cents into the ring, I just switched to the mac recently and have been an ardent advocate of Dreamweaver. I have used many HTML editors over the years and Dreamweaver was by far the best. However, I have to change that after using RapidWeaver, it does a fantastic job and it can be as simple or as complex as you want it to be.

    For the Mac users it is a far cheaper option and has everything that a high-end commercial package like Dreamweaver provides and is far more user friendly, even for a geek like me.
    How easy is it to perform SEO functions in rapidweaver? Some have told me all WYSIWYG is bad for google
  • Profile picture of the author Robert Oliver
    RapidWeaver has my vote.

    Lots of options available.

    Robert
  • Profile picture of the author cindym
    Originally Posted by Garrett Aren View Post

    You really don't need Dreamweaver. Yea... it's got some nice bells and whistles but you could just as easily use NVU (a free WYSIWYG editor)... or code it by hand in TextEdit.

    If you want to learn a little bit about coding and website design... just PM me and I can teach you some stuff.

    I know what it's like to pound your forehead with a ball pin hammer with some of this stuff, so that is why I am offering to help.

    NVU is more currently maintained here:

    KompoZer - downloads

    Has a Mac-ish version and it's free too.
  • Profile picture of the author pearsonbrown
    I use Dreamweaver - but then I've been using it since it first came out so know it well.

    But if I were new to this, i wouldn't be looking beyond Wordpress.

    Pearson

    PS I've never used the built-in Iweb. Nobody else here mentions it. Is it awful?
  • Profile picture of the author jimmorris
    I would use an online builder that is web software loaded on your domain and there aren't too many good online site builders. But this is EXACTLY why I say you go to WordPress as a content management system which doesn't require any site builder to take with you on vacation and you wanna write a page or a post. I explain the whole benefits with my WordPress expert on the line....

    NicheBOT Live Coaching Show 37 January 28 at 5 PM Pacific
  • Profile picture of the author lexilexi
    BBEdit all the way for me. Takes longer to learn but if you understand the code you're writing, you can do it all.
  • Profile picture of the author daelx
    Can't believe all of you recommending Dreamweaver. This isn't 2002. Hello.

    If you know what you're doing then it's CODA all the way.

    If you don't know what you're doing then get RAPIDWEAVER, but be warned anything that writes code for you will make a messy code.

    Dreamweaver, sucks. You that are using need to move on.
  • Profile picture of the author Marhelper
    Dreamweaver is the way to go IMO.
  • Profile picture of the author Melody
    Having been a mac user since they had 6 inch monitors (and I used to design a print RE mag on the darned thing.......) I have every web design program known to man...womankind.

    I still prefer Adobe's old CS2 over Dreamweaver, but now of course - Adobe bought them and you can't buy CS2. DW is great but there is a longer learning curve and if you are just starting out - you will have some long hours ahead of you before you really start cranking out sites.

    RapidWeaver is great - but not quite a flexible as DW. But you do have an easy drag and drop interface, some good templates, and the last time I checked, a pretty active developer forum that seems to be cranking out new additions and templates pretty regularly.

    All that being said - I am a confirmed Wordpress person. You can do so much with it, and you can add just about any functionality you want. You can easily make it look like a static website by removing comments, dates of posts etc.

    It's great that it is browser based and you can make changes from anywhere on your sites. It's just a fun script to work with.

    And if your host has CPanel - 5 minute install.

    Melody
  • Profile picture of the author Steven Fullman
    Not strictly a website builder...

    BUT, if you want "light" on HTML tags, and "heavy" on CSS flexibility, check out CSSEdit by MacRabbit.

    Awesome. And only about 30 bucks (I seem to remember).

    Steve
  • Profile picture of the author simba999
    Awesome! Thanks Guys so much for all your help! I will try rapidweaver probably , and word press too I tried dreamweaver, soooo much to learn, and I want it to be a little quicker. thanks
    sheila

Next Topics on Trending Feed

  • 5 {{ upvoteCount | shortNum }} 5

    Hi guys! I have a snails farm and snails factory. Basically what we do is export snails production such as snails caviar, canned snails and so on... we do have couple of clients but it's not enough. However we dont really do any marketing campaigns and its hard to attract clients by placing an ad on alibaba. So guys maybe some of you could give me some advice what kind of strategies I could implement to grow this business? Thanks!

  • 32 {{ upvoteCount | shortNum }} 5

    I am a professional writer and have quite a few clients that I write for regularly. I want to expand my clientele and I offer people free written content. I understand that these new potential clients have never worked with me before, so I start writing for them for free, just so they can get a good idea of the standard of my work. Then when they are happy with it, they pay me for the full service. Firstly, is this a good idea? I would think that it would be a great way for anyone who needs written content to get a look at a potential supplier while having zero risk. They pay nothing so if they don't like it, they can just tell me and we go our separate ways (although this very rarely happens as I offer high quality written content).