Amazon- examples of highly converting affiliate sites ?

Profile picture of the author Plato by Plato Posted: 05/28/2012
Hi there,

as i would like to tap further into Amazon affiliate marketing i was wondering how does a highly converting Amazon affiliate website look like ?

Would be great if you could share any examples.


Also, what kind of Amazon affiliate website will usual convert better-

* a review site, or
* a shop site, or
* any other kind of website ?

Thanks
#affiliate #amazon #converting #examples #highly #sites

  • Profile picture of the author wolfmmiii
    wolfmmiii
    Review sites convert best in my opinion. I do very well with Amazon with just a handful of review sites. My best sites show reviews that are no longer than a few (250-500) words each. I don't post my own sites anymore because too many people just try and copy them (I see this in my stat logs).
  • Profile picture of the author Adevictus
    Adevictus
    Here: TopTenREVIEWS Expert Product Reviews

    Those guys probably get $xx,xxx in Amazon commissions monthly...
  • Profile picture of the author Plato
    Plato
    Good advice & nice examples- thanks for that.

    These Amazon affiliate shop sites seem to be much less work, certainly when you use a plug in like wpzonbuilder which seems to be quite popular. I still wonder how these sites will rank- guess you have to add a lot of unique content.

    @ wolfmmiii : since you have quite a lot of experience with amazon aff sites- do you use any amazon plugins for your websites with good results .. ?


    Any more Amazon good shop / review sites examples to share ?..
  • Profile picture of the author Chris Cole
    Chris Cole
    Hi Plato,

    whilst there are many working with Amazon, I highly doubt if anyone is going to reveal their highly converting websites in the open forum. I think you may have to make an educated guess as to the sites that are high converting sites.

    If I could make a recommendation to progress your Amazon career, then please check out some of the following Amazon WSO's

    Jan Roos - Physical Affiliate
    Erica Stone's - Amazon Niche Master, Extreme Review
    Gaz Coopers - AMZ training academy
    Jamie Garside's - Amazon mind control

    Whilst this list is not all of the great Amazon WSO's, it certainly is the cream of them IMO.

    I have been involved with Amazon for some time now and i'm earning nicely. I still buy most Amazon WSO's as they can still teach me new tricks to add into my business. The WSO's I recommend are all WSO's that I have bought and found to be very helpful.

    Then again it is up to you how you wish to move your business forward, best advice is to go and get each of the above WSOs and learn from them...
  • Profile picture of the author kongz
    kongz
    Any site that ranks well, converts well. Customers usually know what they're looking for. You just need to take them there and it just have to be you or me.

    Speaking of conversion, I do have a site that ranks well but doesn't convert. It took too many clicks to get to amazon that was why.
  • Profile picture of the author Gaz Cooper
    Gaz Cooper
    Yes as mentioned no more exposing the money sites simply because I can guarantee you there will be 50 clones of it within the same amount of minutes LOL.

    A good site will have lots of relevant information giving the visitors what they are looking for which is relevant detailed information on the product or subject matter.

    Do that and you will do well

    I will answer the question you posed to Wolfii also and yes I use an auto poster but I developed my own and it emails me when it posts to reminds me to head over and make the post unique and YES it ranks very well.

    Kickin it on Amazon

    Gaz Cooper
    Amz Training Academy
  • Profile picture of the author wolfmmiii
    wolfmmiii
    Originally Posted by Plato View Post
    @ wolfmmiii : since you have quite a lot of experience with amazon aff sites- do you use any amazon plugins for your websites with good results .. ?
    I do use an Amazon plugin or two but, similar to Gaz, I've modified them to do exactly what I want them to do.

    I've never been a fan of the whole autoposting thing. I want people to return to my site once they've found it through the SERPs. Just spitting out autoposted Amazon content doesn't accomplish that.
  • Profile picture of the author Plato
    Plato
    Great tips - appreciate it

    A course which shows how to build & rank a site using one of these autoposter plugins in combination with unique content would be interesting.

    Will have a look at the these WSOs & courses/trainings mentioned in this thread

    So reviewsites will usually get higher conversions than shopsites?

    Cheers
  • Profile picture of the author wolfmmiii
    wolfmmiii
    Originally Posted by Plato View Post
    Hi there,

    as i would like to tap further into Amazon affiliate marketing i was wondering how does a highly converting Amazon affiliate website look like ?

    Would be great if you could share any examples.
    This isn't a live site but it is a demo site I'm using for a current WSO. It is very very similar to the kinds of sites I build:

    My Tool Review Blog › Log In
    username: demouser
    password: password

    The demo video below is best watched in full screen.


    Although there are 6 review templates to choose from, my best converting review template is the Two Images template. Create a dummy review and you'll have an idea of what my own reviews look like and how they function.
  • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
    Alexa Smith
    Originally Posted by kongz View Post
    Any site that ranks well, converts well.
    I know it's only June, but so far this is perhaps the most surprising (and least accurate) assertion I've seen in this forum in 2012.

    Originally Posted by Plato View Post
    i was wondering how does a highly converting Amazon affiliate website look like ?
    One thing I can tell you: it has an opt-in, so that its owner can build a list. Don't imagine that "the commissions on Amazon sales are too small to make it worthwhile building lists". It's about whether you want to chase just 10% of your available income or the other 90% as well.
  • Profile picture of the author wolfmmiii
    wolfmmiii
    Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post
    It's about whether you want to chase just 10% of your available income or the other 90% as well.
    I'm not sure I agree with this. I've tried the opt-in stuff on some of my review sites and it just doesn't perform well. I get a very, very small fraction of that 90% to opt-in and, of course, an even smaller fraction of that fraction will ever open your emails, let alone buy something. So really, instead of chasing the other 90%, I'm chasing some fraction of a fraction of that 90%, while missing out on affiliate clicks (and commissions) I would have otherwise gotten.

    I receive very few opt-ins and to be honest, I think it's because the person searching for widget reviews is late in the buying cycle. As such, by the time I send the user his first mailing, he already has the widget he was looking for. Maybe it's just my style of site that doesn't work well with opt-ins but I've seen nothing but terrible performance on multiple sites.

    Now, as I said in another thread, I suppose this could work if you make the opt-ins your site's primary focus (offer reviews/info in exchange for an opt-in). However, once you do that, the site is really no longer an Amazon site but more of a squeeze page since you really are forsaking affiliate clicks for emails.
  • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
    Alexa Smith
    Originally Posted by wolfmmiii View Post
    I've tried the opt-in stuff on some of my review sites and it just doesn't perform well.
    No, I know. Review sites are no good. Not for me, anyway.

    Originally Posted by wolfmmiii View Post
    I get a very, very small fraction of that 90% to opt-in
    I didn't suggest that anything like 90% will opt in.

    I said only that promoting Amazon products without list-building is limiting yourself to chasing 10% of the income available to you if you build lists, rather than the other 90% as well.

    Originally Posted by wolfmmiii View Post
    Maybe it's just my style of site that doesn't work well with opt-ins
    Maybe. I admit I wouldn't use a review site, myself, for Amazon promotions.

    Originally Posted by wolfmmiii View Post
    I suppose this could work if you make the opt-ins your site's primary focus
    Exactly so. The opt-in is always the primary focus of all the sites to which I draw potential customer traffic.

    Originally Posted by wolfmmiii View Post
    However, once you do that, the site is really no longer an Amazon site but more of a squeeze page
    Sorry, but I don't agree with this at all. After all the split-testing I've done, I don't use squeeze pages any more. I find that I earn significantly more if I opt people in through a content-rich site, and that that works "for Amazon products" just like it does for other things. I do completely take your point about the "stage of the buying cycle" and feel sure you're right about that.
  • Profile picture of the author myob
    myob
    Originally Posted by wolfmmiii View Post
    I've tried the opt-in stuff on some of my review sites and it just doesn't perform well.
    Just because this doesn't work for you does not mean it's ineffective. IMO, review sites are inherently the least effective in conversions, because they contain some rather cheesy sales "techniques", which are increasingly more of a turn-off for savvy buyers. It takes several exposures to make a sale; with "review sites" you get just one wimpy shot.

    You can build lists using any number of marketing methods; opt-in forms on Amazon sites is only one method. What I do is incentivize buyers of Clickbank and Amazon sales to opt-in for additional product information, free tips, and relevant product updates. As customers consistently experience satisfactory results from the recommended products, they will buy incrementally higher end products.

    Over the course of the niche autoresponder sequence, customers buy products which frequently exceeds 4-digit price points. By not building customer lists, you are leaving a whole lot of money on the table.
  • Profile picture of the author wolfmmiii
    wolfmmiii
    Originally Posted by myob View Post
    Just because this doesn't work for you does not mean it's ineffective.
    Hence the reason I stated it didn't work when "I" tried it.

    Originally Posted by myob View Post
    IMO, review sites are inherently the least effective in conversions. It takes several exposures to make a sale, but with "review sites" you get just one shot.
    Not if you are doing them right.

    Originally Posted by myob View Post
    And actually you can build lists using any number of marketing methods; Amazon sites is only one method.
    Agreed. However, the context of the thread is about Amazon sites.

    Originally Posted by myob View Post
    What I do is incentivize buyers of Clickbank and Amazon sales to opt-in for additional product information, free tips, and relevant product updates. As customers consistently experience satisfactory results from the recommended products, they will buy incrementally higher end products. Over the course of the niche autoresponder sequence, customers buy products which frequently exceeds 4-digit price points.
    I'm sure it works. However, I, personally, am not into email marketing right now. Although I will admit that it's something that's been bouncing around in my head to at least try out for a bit.
  • Profile picture of the author myob
    myob
    Originally Posted by wolfmmiii View Post
    Not if you are doing them right.
    So, are we assured that "doing them right" is covered in your WSO - including examples of highly converting review sites?
  • Profile picture of the author wolfmmiii
    wolfmmiii
    Originally Posted by myob View Post
    So, are we assured that "doing them right" is covered in your WSO - including examples of highly converting review sites?
    I can't control what people write so, no, I make no guarantees. The WSO, now that you mention it, is more of a framework that provides multiple product review templates and a data-entry backend that streamlines the review creation process. It's actually pretty slick.

    There's a demo site on the WSO page so feel free to try it out if you are so inclined.
  • Profile picture of the author mc9320
    mc9320
    Originally Posted by wolfmmiii View Post
    I'm not sure I agree with this. I've tried the opt-in stuff on some of my review sites and it just doesn't perform well. I get a very, very small fraction of that 90% to opt-in and, of course, an even smaller fraction of that fraction will ever open your emails, let alone buy something. So really, instead of chasing the other 90%, I'm chasing some fraction of a fraction of that 90%, while missing out on affiliate clicks (and commissions) I would have otherwise gotten.

    I receive very few opt-ins and to be honest, I think it's because the person searching for widget reviews is late in the buying cycle. As such, by the time I send the user his first mailing, he already has the widget he was looking for. Maybe it's just my style of site that doesn't work well with opt-ins but I've seen nothing but terrible performance on multiple sites.

    Now, as I said in another thread, I suppose this could work if you make the opt-ins your site's primary focus (offer reviews/info in exchange for an opt-in). However, once you do that, the site is really no longer an Amazon site but more of a squeeze page since you really are forsaking affiliate clicks for emails.
    This is very interesting, mainly because I have a couple of review sites and have just started list building without much success...yet. Maybe it is because whoever visits your site is just interested in reading a review and moving on, or just buying the product via the affiliate link and leaving your site. I imagine this is definitely the case with SEO traffic. What do you think?

    Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post
    No, I know. Review sites are no good. Not for me, anyway.

    I didn't suggest that anything like 90% will opt in.

    I said only that promoting Amazon products without list-building is limiting yourself to chasing 10% of the income available to you if you build lists, rather than the other 90% as well.

    Maybe. I admit I wouldn't use a review site, myself, for Amazon promotions.

    Exactly so. The opt-in is always the primary focus of all the sites to which I draw potential customer traffic.

    Sorry, but I don't agree with this at all. After all the split-testing I've done, I don't use squeeze pages any more. I find that I earn significantly more if I opt people in through a content-rich site, and that that works "for Amazon products" just like it does for other things. I do completely take your point about the "stage of the buying cycle" and feel sure you're right about that.
    This is interesting Alexa. So I assume you compile sites which have informative articles that people like to read, who you can then build trust with, and then they opt-in. For your list, do you then send them some more useful articles but also add some product reviews, or simply links to a product review? Where do you send your subscribers if they are interested in buying a product? As far as I understand, you can't copy in Amazon affiliate links into your e-mails, so do you create a specific landing page for each product you are promoting on your site? Sorry for all the questions

    Originally Posted by myob View Post
    Just because this doesn't work for you does not mean it's ineffective. IMO, review sites are inherently the least effective in conversions, because they contain some rather cheesy sales "techniques", which are increasingly more of a turn-off for savvy buyers. It takes several exposures to make a sale; with "review sites" you get just one wimpy shot.

    You can build lists using any number of marketing methods; opt-in forms on Amazon sites is only one method. What I do is incentivize buyers of Clickbank and Amazon sales to opt-in for additional product information, free tips, and relevant product updates. As customers consistently experience satisfactory results from the recommended products, they will buy incrementally higher end products.

    Over the course of the niche autoresponder sequence, customers buy products which frequently exceeds 4-digit price points. By not building customer lists, you are leaving a whole lot of money on the table.
    I haven't thought of this approach before. So your method is rather than giving visitors verything they need, leave them wanting more, so they have to opt-in
  • Profile picture of the author myob
    myob
    Originally Posted by mc9320 View Post
    So your method is rather than giving visitors verything they need, leave them wanting more, so they have to opt-in
    That's not even close to my method. What I always strive for is to exceed expectations of my visitors/customers. That is why they choose to opt-in.
  • Profile picture of the author JackieGold
    JackieGold
    Originally Posted by wolfmmiii View Post
    This isn't a live site but it is a demo site I'm using for a current WSO. It is very very similar to the kinds of sites I build:

    My Tool Review Blog › Log In
    username: demouser
    password: password

    The demo video below is best watched in full screen.

    Creating a Product Review With The Ultimate Product Review System - YouTube

    Although there are 6 review templates to choose from, my best converting review template is the Two Images template. Create a dummy review and you'll have an idea of what my own reviews look like and how they function.
    Thanks for sharing. But I have a question for you: why are you still setting meta keywords for AIO SEO? Doesn't everybody agree that engines don't look at them?
  • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
    Alexa Smith
    Originally Posted by mc9320 View Post
    This is interesting Alexa. So I assume you compile sites which have informative articles that people like to read, who you can then build trust with, and then they opt-in.
    Well ... this is perhaps overstating it a little, because the way my sites are set out doesn't exactly invite people to read my articles (though they can, if they really want to - I don't mean to suggest that I'm "concealing" them, either). They're on my sites for two main reasons: first for the long-term SEO advantages accruing from accumulating all the initial indexations, before they're syndicated anywhere else; secondly, to present people with an obviously "content-rich site" (not quite the same thing as "giving them articles to read"!), because whenever I've split-tested - which I've done in only 4 of my niches, admittedly - I've made more money by opting people in through a content-rich site than I have by opting them in with a squeeze page. But, that said, I strongly suspect that very few of my visitors actually read many articles there at all. Which is, in a way, just as well, because I re-use some of the information in the articles in my autoresponder series, too.

    Originally Posted by mc9320 View Post
    For your list, do you then send them some more useful articles but also add some product reviews, or simply links to a product review?
    Yes, a bit of both. (The "article stuff" is re-written slightly, to make it more suitable for an autoresponder message).

    Originally Posted by mc9320 View Post
    Where do you send your subscribers if they are interested in buying a product? As far as I understand, you can't copy in Amazon affiliate links into your e-mails, so do you create a specific landing page for each product you are promoting on your site?
    Yes, for Amazon you need to send them to your site, for this reason. For ClickBank, you can send them a hoplink in an email (I always use a .info domain-name to mask the hoplink, when I do that, because it significantly increases the proportion who'll click on it, but of course I'm open about it being an affiliate-link. Just realized the thread's about Amazon only, so that comment was irrelevant ).

    I think "clicking your links, expecting to find something nice" is a good habit to get people into, right from the start, in as many emails as you can, so I often include links (sometimes just to things on my own site) in non-promotional emails, too.

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