Are you "Productive" or "Effective"?

by Able Kinetic 9 replies
It’s common to hear how we “need to be more productive.” Since “productive” is used so often, it’s worth checking the dictionary to guarantee it means what we think it means.

“Productive” has a greater focus on high quantity; completing a great number of tasks. “Effective” focuses more on high quality; specific acts which most efficiently advance towards a particular goal.

The ability to create in abundance may be a good thing as long as it’s directed towards a specific goal. I can dig holes in my yard and refill them all day long. We can argue that I was “productive” but was I actually “effective”? Not so much unless my goal was to provide a playground for gophers. Doing more of something doesn’t guarantee energy well spent.

One might say "It's just semantics". However, words are incredibly important because they shape how we think and how we express ourselves. They influence our perceptions, biases, thoughts, and arguments. Words enhance (or weaken) our ability to communicate with and influence others.

Is it possible that we use “being productive” as a disguise or rationalization for “busy work” which doesn’t actually accomplish any specific goal? Here’s some good news. There’s a great way to help maintain focus and avoid unproductive “busy work”: Use the word “effective” instead. This way, it's more difficult to rationalize productive, but ineffective behavior. Thank goodness for boatloads of improvement
#mind warriors #effective #productive
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  • Profile picture of the author tagiscom
    Lol, the Gophers would find it productive and effective, after all, all they do all day is tear up golf courses, and dance to the occasional song.

    Maybe if they visualized, "be the ball" they might get in a round?

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  • Profile picture of the author Odahh
    at this point ..i am going to say your idea or concept in this post has nothing to do with productivity but a lot to do with the concept of hard work

    if you dig holes one day and fill them in the next you might do some hard work but you are neither productive or effective ..

    the same way that in a traditional company when it is slow

    if you are gigging holes one day and you or someone else is filling them in the next ..19 times out of 20 you are working for a union..so if you wonder why uninions have lost so many members in the USA ..there are enough people making sure work done is either productive or profitable
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  • Profile picture of the author hardraysnight
    it is just semantics
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  • Profile picture of the author dana67
    I think it's possible to be productive and effective at the same time. Don't look busy. Be busy.
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    • Profile picture of the author ryanbiddulph
      The BEING point is what I am about Dana. Create quality, in a high volume, be BEING the person who is generous, kind, acts abundantly and serves. I spend most of my day giving and little focus on getting here. Opposite vibe of most struggling Warriors. Be effective, and be that person daily.
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      Ryan Biddulph, Blogger, Author, World Traveling Digital Nomad
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  • Profile picture of the author ryanbiddulph
    REALLY big on this distinction. Product more? Or produce quality? Or both I focus exclusively on effectiveness, versus trying to produce more of anything. Thanks much.
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    Ryan Biddulph, Blogger, Author, World Traveling Digital Nomad
    Retire to a Life of Island Hopping through Smart Blogging at Blogging From Paradise
  • Profile picture of the author RazvanRogozC
    Originally Posted by Able Kinetic View Post

    It’s common to hear how we “need to be more productive.” Since “productive” is used so often, it’s worth checking the dictionary to guarantee it means what we think it means.

    “Productive” has a greater focus on high quantity; completing a great number of tasks. “Effective” focuses more on high quality; specific acts which most efficiently advance towards a particular goal.

    The ability to create in abundance may be a good thing as long as it’s directed towards a specific goal. I can dig holes in my yard and refill them all day long. We can argue that I was “productive” but was I actually “effective”? Not so much unless my goal was to provide a playground for gophers. Doing more of something doesn’t guarantee energy well spent.

    One might say "It's just semantics". However, words are incredibly important because they shape how we think and how we express ourselves. They influence our perceptions, biases, thoughts, and arguments. Words enhance (or weaken) our ability to communicate with and influence others.

    Is it possible that we use “being productive” as a disguise or rationalization for “busy work” which doesn’t actually accomplish any specific goal? Here’s some good news. There’s a great way to help maintain focus and avoid unproductive “busy work”: Use the word “effective” instead. This way, it's more difficult to rationalize productive, but ineffective behavior. Thank goodness for boatloads of improvement
    Actually, one of the biggest mistakes is thinking in terms of OR. Effective and efficient (productive) go together. Yes, you need to work on the right things as the 20 - 80 rule applies. However, you still need to work your ass off, just on the right things.

    There's this common mistake of thinking that if you apply the 20 - 80 rule, instead of working 10 hours on something, you'll only work two of them. This is true. It generally works this way. However, you'll not get superior results, you'll just get more time. You'll eliminate a lot of the noise but this doesn't mean you'll have achieved more. Putting 10 hours into what is the 20% actually means achieving more.

    Best regards,
    Razvan Rogoz
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    • Profile picture of the author cynthiaSEL
      Originally Posted by RazvanRogozC View Post

      There's this common mistake of thinking that if you apply the 20 - 80 rule, instead of working 10 hours on something, you'll only work two of them. This is true. It generally works this way. However, you'll not get superior results, you'll just get more time. You'll eliminate a lot of the noise but this doesn't mean you'll have achieved more. Putting 10 hours into what is the 20% actually means achieving more.
      Indeed! And there's the ongoing struggle to 80/20 what you're doing at each level. That way you grow to achieve more as part of your process of living and working.
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  • Profile picture of the author TrafficQueen
    Yeh i know its an overrated word..
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