Top 10 All Time Male Vocalists

by 123 comments
In going through my music history, I find that male vocalists (at least the
really good ones) are less prevalent in rock and roll and more prevalent in
the standards of yesterday like Sinatra and Crosby. I wonder why? Having
said that, there are a few in the rock era that I thought sung well even
though most tried to scream their way through the tune.

Here is my list of favorites. Number 1 is number 1 for me. Wow, what a voice
he had.

Gary Puckett
Bing Crosby
Frank Sinatra
Harry Connick Jr.
Sammy Hagar (the best of the screamers)
Steve Perry
Nat King Cole
Ezio Pinza (go listen to Some Enchanted Evening sometime)
Josh Groban (the best today)
Jon Anderson (made Yes what they were)

My mother, God rest her soul, an opera singer, said Garry Puckett gave
her goose bumps. Young Girl, Woman Woman, Lady Willpower and Over
You were 4 of the biggest songs of 1968. Anybody else would have never
gotten these tunes as big as they got.

Anyway, I know I've left out a ton of talent so take it away.
#off topic

  • Profile picture of the author Michael Motley
    Originally Posted by Steven Wagenheim View Post

    Frank Sinatra
    End of the thread right there. You can't match the master. I don't care how old you are, or where you are from, or what music you listen to there is atleast one Sinatra song that you will probably like

    I like a lot of guys, mostly r&b singers, but there is only one sinatra.

    also Tony Bennett.
  • Profile picture of the author jmidas
    Meatloaf - amazing voice everyone has forgotten.
    Frankie Valli
    Elton John
    Otis Redding
    Frank - will always be #1
    Bing
    Sammie (Davis Jr, not Hagar)

    not 10, but that's the beginning of my list.
  • Profile picture of the author Steven Wagenheim
    Originally Posted by jmidas View Post

    Meatloaf - amazing voice everyone has forgotten.
    Frankie Valli
    Otis Redding
    Frank - will always be #1
    Bing
    Sammie (Davis Jr, not Hagar)

    not 10, but that's the beginning of my list.
    Yeah, Meat Loaf had a great voice but it's shot to hell now. I have Bat Out
    Of Hell, the followup and his last album.

    The guy sure had a set of pipes.
  • Profile picture of the author jmidas
    I remember buying Bat Out of Hell when it came out and playing it over and over and over...

    I forgot to put Ray Charles on my list.

    And, another, Freddie Mercury - weird as could be, but incredible voice.
  • Profile picture of the author Kurt
    Originally Posted by jmidas View Post


    I forgot to put Ray Charles on my list.
    Ray is the greatest American singer of all time. No one has the range he has. How many others can sign jazz and country/western? Not to mention, rock, pop, blues. No one sang with more feeling and expression than Ray and to me this defines American music.

    Elvis is number two.

    John Lee Hooker - The definitive blues voice.

    Nat King Cole beats Sinatra hands down. I'll take Deano over Sinatra as well.

    I also like Kim Wilson of the Fab T-Birds.

    Although not into his music, Bing Crosby had a great, smooth voice.

    Howlin Wolf, while his voice is rough, he is a master at inflection.

    David Bowie is a great singer.

    Also, Gene Vincent

    Little Richard

    Jim Morrison - I'm not into the Doors, but the guy had a great voice.

    I love Mick Jaggar, but to say he has a good voice would be a stretch.

    And I hate to admit it publicly , but I love Box Car Willie's voice.
  • Profile picture of the author Killer Joe
    Is it just me or has anyone else noticed that in all the threads about great musicians nobody (yet :rolleyes has mentioned Michael Jackson?

    Van Morrison
    Elvis Costello
    Jackson Brown
    Any of the Eagles
    Joe Cocker
    Andrea Bocelli
    John Lennon

    Donnie Osmond
    Shaun Cassidy
    Wait a minute, I better save these for the Top 10 Boy Bands thread

    KJ
  • Profile picture of the author Patrician
    Nat King Cole (my favorite since I was like 5 years old)

    Stevie Wonder as a little child - the most beautiful crystal clear voice I have ever heard - just average after he grew up.

    Bob Dylan - the master songwriter of our age, and voice may be nasal and raspy, but figure, write, sing, play harmonica and guitar all at the same time.

    Righteous Brothers
    Joey Ramone
    Wilson Pickett
    Jackie Wilson
    Little Anthony
    Joe Cocker - back in the day
    Jim Morrison
    John Lennon

    So many unknown lead singers in groups of the 50-60s like the Cadillacs, Olympics, etc. check out this deep tenor voice. (Eddie Lewis)



    Fred Paris and The Five Satins

  • Profile picture of the author Kurt
    Originally Posted by Killer Joe View Post

    Donnie Osmond

    KJ
    I saw a video in the late 80's that spliced together a bunch of people singing the same song...I "think" it was Infatuation, by Rod Stewart/Jeff Beck.

    Donnie Osmond had about 15 seconds of being the singer and he was far and away the best singer of the bunch. He really does have a very good voice, if he'd just pick better songs.

    It's sad in a way, he's almost become the symbol for being "uncool", which is entirely based on his goody-goody image, but ignores that he is a talented singer. We often need to seperate the artist from the art (and image).
  • Profile picture of the author Lawrh
    A bit more eclectic perhaps, I love voice. My favourite instrument.

    Jussi Bjoerling
    Bob Marley
    Dean Martin
    Bryn Terfel
    Placido Domingo
    Robert Plant
    Al Jolson
    Marty Robbins
    Jimi Hendrix
    Harry Belafonte
    Louis Armstrong
    Vaughn Monroe
    Paul Butterfield
    Leo Kottke

    Better stop, too many amazing voices, I could go on for a very long time.
  • Profile picture of the author Dave Allen
    As usual, this is completely subjective.

    Here's my quick list...

    Roy Orbison -- (this guy had a 4 or 5 octave range - enough said)
    Freddie Mercury -- (this crazy little thing could sing like Elvis and more)
    Elvis -- (the voice, the charisma, the presence -- what else can you say?)
    John Fogerty (back in his day -- this guy just oozed with soul/realism)
    Paul Rogers (now this is one bad ass singer)
    John Lennon (imagine having a voice like his)
    Roger Daltry ( don't get fooled again -- this guy can sing)
    Bono (in his prime he could belt it out with the best of them)
    Elton John (the melody and dynamics in his good old days)

    I'm sure I missed some. But that's a start.
  • Profile picture of the author John Rogers
    Ah, I see someone did get Robert Plant.

    Roger Daltrey certainly belongs on the list as well.

    John

    Edit: Looks like Dave Allen beat me to the punch.

    My top ten list would look pretty close to Dave's.
  • Profile picture of the author Kurt
    Originally Posted by Dave Allen View Post

    As usual, this is completely subjective.

    Here's my quick list...

    Roy Orbison -- (this guy had a 4 or 5 octave range - enough said)
    .
    Yep...He should have been on my list. He had incredible octave range.

    I don't mean to brag, but I have 1/2 octave range...There's at least 5-6 notes I can hit.
  • Profile picture of the author Kurt
    Here's a great singer I don't think anyone mentioned, Tom Jones:



    Here's another Tom dedicates to Leadbelly:

  • Profile picture of the author Lawrh
    Originally Posted by Kurt View Post

    Here's a great singer I don't think anyone mentioned, Tom Jones:
    Flashback! When I was fifteen my favourite singles were Born to be Wild by Steppenwolf and Delila by Tom Jones. Amazing pipes, that song really got to me.
  • Profile picture of the author Kurt
    Originally Posted by Lawrh View Post

    Flashback! When I was fifteen my favourite singles were Born to be Wild by Steppenwolf and Delila by Tom Jones. Amazing pipes, that song really got to me.

    Here ya go:

  • Profile picture of the author Steven Wagenheim
    Originally Posted by Kurt View Post

    Here's a great singer I don't think anyone mentioned, Tom Jones:

    YouTube - Dave Swift on Bass Backing Tom Jones & Jeff Beck "Be-Bop-A-Lula"


    Here's another Tom dedicates to Leadbelly:

    YouTube - Tom Jones - Black Betty
    Kurt, Tom Jones had one heck of a voice, I agree. I remember, as a kid,
    the first time I heard "What's New Pussycat?"

    He was probably one of the most popular singers in the 60s and early 70s
    before his career started to taper off.
  • Profile picture of the author Dave Allen
    Hey Kurt,

    Yeah, you're right. Tom Jones has an amazing set of pipes. My buddy, I was mentioning, who had played keyboards with Richie Blackmore's Rainbow, reminded me of that a couple of weeks ago when we were having some beers. Tom can belt it out -- no doubt.
  • Profile picture of the author Ken Strong
    Burton Cummings of the Guess Who, and John Fogerty of Creedence had very distinctive, unique voices when they were in their prime.

    Kurt Cobain was great, too. I think the key for guys like these is they wrote their own material -- they couldn't necessarily make a living as song interpreters, the way guys like Sinatra, Crosby, and Bennett could, but they were perfect for the bands they were in.
  • Profile picture of the author Dave Allen
    Hey Ken,

    You're absolutely right. Burton Cummings was one of the "unsung" hero's. (amazing)

    Plus, (what you were referring to -- guys like Kurt Cobain, John Fogerty, to mention only a couple) that's one of the key components of "mostly everything" that "differentiates" itself and "positions" itself as a -- unique "brand". They may not have been "THE best", (necessarily, or were/are) but... they (did/present) themselves in a way that distinguished them from everything else that was/is out there.

    That's always an extremely powerful place to come from.
  • Profile picture of the author Steven Wagenheim
    Originally Posted by KenStrong View Post

    Burton Cummings of the Guess Who, and John Fogerty of Creedence had very distinctive, unique voices when they were in their prime.

    Kurt Cobain was great, too. I think the key for guys like these is they wrote their own material -- they couldn't necessarily make a living as song interpreters, the way guys like Sinatra, Crosby, and Bennett could, but they were perfect for the bands they were in.
    Ah, Burton Cummings. Ever hear him do "Stand Tall?"

    Man that guy could sing.

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