Ask for the Sale by Including a "Call to Action" in Your Marketing Materials

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NUMBER ONE MARKETING MYTH: It's rude (and wrong) to outright ask your customer(s) for the sale.

TRUTH: It's perfectly okay to ask for the sale. The most successful sales people always do ... and that's why they're successful.

One of the most important parts of any sales and marketing campaign is what is called the "call to action;" and you should include it in all your elevator pitches (both written and verbal) as often as you can. Stated simply, a "call to action" is your request to your customer(s) to buy whatever it is that you're selling right now. TODAY!

Sometimes, people do an amazing job of selling others on their products and services, but then they walk away from that customer without officially closing the sale while the opportunity is still hot. If you let them walk away, that opportunity will go cold quickly. Then you'll have to re-sell to them all over again the next time you see them. That's wasted time and energy.

That said, I want to qualify this by saying your "call to action" has to be a lot more savvy than simply sending out an email to a subscriber list that has, for example, a copy of your latest book cover attached and not much else other than, "I've just published this new book! Buy it today!" That will get you very few sales, if any.

For best results, your marketing material (elevator pitch) should answer that customer's known question "what's in it for me? why should I buy this?" in a marketing language they will relate to most, it should include one or two of your top keywords, it should clearly outline the features and benefits of your book, and then it should confidently call your customers to action by appealing to their pain points and providing some sort of immediate solution/incentive to them (e.g. limited time offer, limited supply).

Outwardly asking for the sale doesn't always work immediately. But I can tell you it works a lot better than never asking at all. If you've never done this before, start practicing. Start incorporating it into your elevator pitch so you become more comfortable with it. You'll see an increase in your sales if you do.
#offline marketing #call to action #elevator pitch #including #marketing #materials #sale #whats in it for me #wiifm
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  • Profile picture of the author DABK
    Number one marketing myth according to?

    I am guessing I've never met the most successful sales people. Nobody's ever asked me to buy something in the elevator (situation).

    Originally Posted by Best Seller View Post

    NUMBER ONE MARKETING MYTH: It's rude (and wrong) to outright ask your customer(s) for the sale.

    TRUTH: It's perfectly okay to ask for the sale. The most successful sales people always do ... and that's why they're successful.

    One of the most important parts of any sales and marketing campaign is what is called the "call to action;" and you should include it in all your elevator pitches (both written and verbal) as often as you can. Stated simply, a "call to action" is your request to your customer(s) to buy whatever it is that you're selling right now. TODAY!

    Sometimes, people do an amazing job of selling others on their products and services, but then they walk away from that customer without officially closing the sale while the opportunity is still hot. If you let them walk away, that opportunity will go cold quickly. Then you'll have to re-sell to them all over again the next time you see them. That's wasted time and energy.

    That said, I want to qualify this by saying your "call to action" has to be a lot more savvy than simply sending out an email to a subscriber list that has, for example, a copy of your latest book cover attached and not much else other than, "I've just published this new book! Buy it today!" That will get you very few sales, if any.

    For best results, your marketing material (elevator pitch) should answer that customer's known question "what's in it for me? why should I buy this?" in a marketing language they will relate to most, it should include one or two of your top keywords, it should clearly outline the features and benefits of your book, and then it should confidently call your customers to action by appealing to their pain points and providing some sort of immediate solution/incentive to them (e.g. limited time offer, limited supply).

    Outwardly asking for the sale doesn't always work immediately. But I can tell you it works a lot better than never asking at all. If you've never done this before, start practicing. Start incorporating it into your elevator pitch so you become more comfortable with it. You'll see an increase in your sales if you do.
  • Profile picture of the author animal44
    Originally Posted by Best Seller View Post

    Sometimes, people do an amazing job of selling others on their products and services, but then they walk away from that customer without officially closing the sale while the opportunity is still hot. If you let them walk away, that opportunity will go cold quickly. Then you'll have to re-sell to them all over again the next time you see them. That's wasted time and energy.
    IMHO if you have to "sell" somebody on something,
    1. Your marketing materials need review.
    2. You've qualified badly.

    You're also not taking into account different personality types. Some like to make a decision now, others like to mull it over...

    IMHO in this day and age people have choices, so you need to be a little more subtle in your close and CTA.
  • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
    Anybody beat this buy button by Perry Belcher?

    Best,
    Ewen

  • Profile picture of the author SARubin
    Originally Posted by Best Seller View Post

    NUMBER ONE MARKETING MYTH: It's rude (and wrong) to outright ask your customer(s) for the sale.
    I've never heard that myth before. I'd be curious to know if anyone actually believes it?

    And if they do, then how do they make a sale? Do they expect the customer to tackle them at the door... rip the order from their hands... and demand the salesman to take their money?

    (although, if anyone does have that much hypnotic charisma, then that's a person I want to learn from)
    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by SARubin View Post

      I've never heard that myth before. I'd be curious to know if anyone actually believes it?

      And if they do, then how do they make a sale? Do they expect the customer to tackle them at the door... rip the order from their hands... and demand the salesman to take their money?

      (although, if anyone does have that much hypnotic charisma, then that's a person I want to learn from)
      I read a book by David Sanders where the close was simply "What you you want to do now?" That about as weak as I've ever seen. But still a call to action of sorts.

      But even in sales where the person was chomping at the bit to buy, I still had to ask them "Is that OK?" or some indication that we were at the stage where we write it up.

      The thread is about marketing materials...which can vary from product brochures to sales letters.
      But...if the point of the marketing material is to trigger a sale, I can't imagine no call to action.

      In a joint venture, talking with a partner, I can imagine not asking a closing question...because it's not really a "sale" but a collaboration. But to an end user? A customer? Somebody has to say something that keeps the conversation from trailing off into infinity.
  • Profile picture of the author Oziboomer
    Originally Posted by Best Seller View Post

    TRUTH: It's perfectly okay to ask for the sale. The most successful sales people always do ... and that's why they're successful.
    [/B] It's rude (and wrong) to outright ask your customer(s) for the sale.
    TRUTH: Prospects, Customers. Clients usually visit your business because they are in the market to BUY something.

    NUMBER ONE REASON WE FAIL: We stuff up.

    - MYTH -The hypnotic power is only unleashed when the prospect is totally receptive - MYTH -

    It does require focus and attention to move a prospect through the purchasing process.

    In many instances this can be effortless because of several reasons.

    The process might be very slippery and fluid moving the prospect easily along the path.

    They may be hyper-responsive to the situation.

    They may have already made up their mind.

    They might be in a hurry.

    Too many reasons to list but if you have an interested prospect in front of you ready to absorb your offer then it can only be your fault if you sabotage the sale.

    If a prospect is "in the market" and by that I mean "ready to buy" then unless the solution you offer is flawed in some way the only reason you fail to make the sale is because you have created a doubt yourself or not fully addressed the doubts the prospect has.

    Many sales people create the doubt in the prospect's mind themselves.

    Sure there are circumstances where there might be financial considerations or circumstances that hinder a sale but this is where a good sales person moves the prospect closer to their dream purchase by offering solutions to meet their needs.

    Deferring the decision to a higher power - eg. "I've got to ask my partner" is more a function of pre-qualifying than one of the closing sections of any sales process.

    It is important to complete a sale and it is important to get paid at that point because without payment the sale is still tentative.

    It is important to have multiple CTAs throughout your marketing material.

    They may not all be the same CTA but they all lead to the same eventual result, getting paid.

    Best regards,

    Ozi
  • Profile picture of the author savidge4
    My forte as it were is e-commerce. Selling product online. Been doing it for years, and I think ive been rather successful at it. If you take a moment and look at your average CTA on a product page, you will notice it is lack luster at best.. usually consisting of words such as "Add to Cart" or "Buy Now" and that's about it.

    With that perspective in mind... I would suggest asking for a sale is actually the most trivial aspect in closing a deal. There are a great amount of factors leading up to that moment where seas part and wallets open. Regardless of how snazzy and technical your CTA is.. remember, there are millions if not billions made daily with "Add to Cart".

    There is an equation I use ( that I have "borrowed" from MecLabs )

    C = 4M + 3V + 2( I + F ) - 2A

    Basically what this is factoring ( M ) motivation ( V ) Value Proposition ( I ) incentive to take action ( F ) friction and ( A ) anxiety. These have to be overcome to get the conversion.. to close the deal. You get these aspects of the sale into your favor.. and all the sudden "Add to Cart" is more than enough. Just look at Walmart or Amazon.. the CTA with both of those as well as pretty much the entire e-commerce world is "Add to Cart"

    Yes I will agree a CTA has to be present.. but it doesn't have to be blatant... it has to be apparent enough to those you have created the motivation, given incentive to removed some if not all of the fear and anxiety, and won them over with your Value Proposition.

    I find less is more.. the CTA or minimalized version of such can be used as a vetting tool. Those that want whatever it is NOW... they WILL act.. those on the fence or are not convinced keep moving.
    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by savidge4 View Post

      With that perspective in mind... I would suggest asking for a sale is actually the most trivial aspect in closing a deal. There are a great amount of factors leading up to that moment where seas part and wallets open. Regardless of how snazzy and technical your CTA is.. remember, there are millions if not billions made daily with "Add to Cart".
      My experience as well. The decision is made before the CTA. The purpose (in selling anyway) of asking a closing question, or (in an online sales letter) having an "Add to cart" or similar button is that it lets the buyer know how to buy.

      Maybe a little aside. I've watched speakers give a fantastic presentation to large groups of people. The audience was ready to buy..eager.

      And the speaker would forget to tell them at the end, specifically how to buy right then.
      And I've seen entire audiences walk out without buying...thinking "I'll do it later, when I get home".

      Audiences need very specific instructions on how to buy then, or they simply won't.

      And in personal selling, even when they are obviously eager to buy from you. There has to be a moment when they let you know to write it up. And you have to give them that opportunity and an instruction on how to buy...even when it's as simple as "Add to cart".
    • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
      Originally Posted by savidge4 View Post


      There is an equation I use ( that I have "borrowed" from MecLabs )

      C = 4M + 3V + 2( I + F ) - 2A
      Great reminder, that equation.

      Surprisingly, the first one, motivation, is thought about
      and leveraged probably the least.

      Pre-existing motivation and the trigger which made a person take action
      before a marketer or salesperson crossed his/her path.

      I like to bring up the tipping point of a traveler who stayed in nice hotel beds
      suddenly can't bear his/her bed at home anymore.

      Facebook Ads Manager tells us those who recently returned home
      so a bed advertiser can be in front of the people who are motivated to buy.

      That's one of many examples I could give to demonstrate the power of understanding
      pre-existing motivation so we can get our message in front of the right people at buying time.

      Best,
      Ewen
  • Profile picture of the author Joyce Birmingham
    Call to action has always been the key.

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