Which Ad Won?

by ewenmack 42 replies
Let's play a game so you can power up
your ad writing skills...

Was it the one with the pretty images
or the one with the big block of text?

Best,
Ewen

#offline marketing #won
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  • Profile picture of the author animal44
    Big block of text.
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  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
    The marketer in me wants to say the ad with the bold headline and lots of text. But the first ad actually has photos of what the results may look like, and ....

    What the hell...the second one.

    The first ad has no compelling offer...in fact, no offer at all. It looks like the ad was created by a photographer...that moonlighted as an ad salesperson.

    The second ad is pure direct marketing.
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  • Profile picture of the author SARubin
    I'm going to guess the second one (the advertorial style one with big block text) was the winner.

    The first one is eye catching, but it looks like an ad that's trying to sell something. The second one looks more like valuable info. (almost like a news story)

    I think it was David Ogilvy? (correct me if I'm wrong) Who said space ads that look like news, and don't look like advertisements, almost always get more readers, and almost always pull better.

    I hope you'll give us the answer when this guessing contest is over?
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    • Profile picture of the author desingeredge
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  • Profile picture of the author Mike AT
    I''ll go for the ad with pretty images.

    Because it's easy to understand and also the benefits is in there.

    I can't read all the text of both ads but, I guess the ad with an image will work. Anyway, this is just a guess.
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  • Profile picture of the author savidge4
    This may be a tough one to call... did anyone notice the phone numbers are the same... same company targeting 2 different segments of market... oh how interesting. The first one has 3 forms of contact.... the second one does offer 2 but visually the mail in is the preferred choice.

    So image 1 ( the pretty pictures ) is either a real poor attempt at millennials targeting ( no social connection ) or they are targeting Gen X. I'm saying more Gen X than anything. Specifically targeted to females 40 to 60 if we wanted to get right down to it... Looking at it this way the line "Enriching your life..." becomes the compelling offer. A place to get away from the job the kids.. quiet time... a more enriched life. This is also a branding effort. Kinda powerful I would say in the right context.

    Ad #2 the block of text.. probably a newspaper ad. Targeting Boomers. Classic advertising.. speaking right to those that are anywhere near the buying process. No in your face branding here.. other than say the guys face. I will bet they have a TV ad that runs.

    Intuitively I want to say #2. You could very quickly look at ad #1 and say this is a pre-sell piece that is looking to brand the company, and get the idea implanted in those that will be in the marketspace in the years to follow. looking at the whole picture this is the long play effort of the campaign.

    BUT... ad 1 does something that ad 2 does not... there is a tripwire in the ad.. Doors and Windows. Gen X buy the bulk of homes in the real estate market.. New home.. means new doors and windows. People that buy doors and windows become proven buyers, and may do additional work on their new homes, and look for the conservatory upgrade. Again Enriching their lives, and their new home.

    My final answer will be.. #1
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  • Profile picture of the author Shams Sikder
    I'd say the first one because it looks more attractive. Plus the second one requires mailing in a section of the paper to get a free report, seems like too much work.
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  • Profile picture of the author Oziboomer
    I guess neither worked particularly well although one might have performed better than the other.

    Their last web crawl on Wayback machine was in 2008.

    ...and a quick check of companies house records in the UK turned up this-->



    I guess no amount of good marketing can keep a business afloat forever.

    Best regards,

    Ozi
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    • Profile picture of the author Ron Lafuddy
      Originally Posted by Oziboomer View Post

      I guess neither worked particularly well although one might have performed better than the other.

      Their last web crawl on Wayback machine was in 2008.

      ...and a quick check of companies house records in the UK turned up this-->



      I guess no amount of good marketing can keep a business afloat forever.

      Best regards,

      Ozi
      I'm gonna go out on a limb here, (call it a hunch) and just conclude that... there are indications... it's very possible... they will not be renewing their advertisements, at this time.

      It's not a psychic thing I'm getting...more of a gut feeling.

      Ron

      On a serious note, I like the advertorial and it's my preference for many things, but the pictures DO add a lot. My guess would be the first one.
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  • Profile picture of the author yukon
    As a buyer I would never pick a wall of text fluff over descriptive images.

    With the images I already know what I'm buying into, the wall of text requires a snail mail form which might take weeks for a response. Hell, by the time you hear back from the snail mail you could have the four season room installed.

    Either way I have no doubt OP will claim the wall of text won, even If there wasn't a split test.
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  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
    I slightly favor the text ad. But if it were just me looking for a 'conservatory" The first ad. I just want to buy. I don't want to jump through hoops to find out the "real truth' behind dealers.

    The headlines are just wrong. To me the second ad has a strong headline but it attracts a small segment of the buying public. The first ad has a headline that offers a benefit (sort of) . At least the company name isn't the headline.

    If I were actually in the market for such a thing, the first ad would attract me slightly more, because i don't want to waste time jumping through hoops.

    The text ad would have been a much clearer winner if the headline wasn't so directed at the type of company, and more directed to the benefits of owning, or triggering a fear. And the headline didn't trigger a strong fear, in my opinion.

    It's interesting to me that the direct marketers mostly like the text ad and the "regular people" like the display ad more.

    Of course, the direct mail ad starts a direct mail campaign and probably a phone call. And there is a stronger call to action, with a booklet as a gift. So it's probably the more profitable. But the headline (appeal) is weak in my opinion.

    My guess is that the second ad pulled three to one in actual sales.
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  • Profile picture of the author Oziboomer
    I also guess you've got to look at the market they were selling into and the period when these ads were run.

    This would have been a time when Yellow Pages and Newspaper Ads were still strong.

    The first ad with the pictures has so many more things going for it.

    The image of the finished conservatory shows the prospect the result in advance.

    The image and the words "Enrich your life" points right to the improvement in Status.

    A homeowner buying a conservatory wants to improve their status and show the neighbours what they have.

    The first ad is much clearer at illustrating

    What the person will have.

    How they will feel when they have it.

    How it will change their life everyday.

    Improvement in their status.

    The second ad lacks in building any desire and even the booklet offer is weak.

    The title of the booklet is not congruent in several places. Near the photo "The Smart Person's Guide to Choosing a Reputable Conservatory Company" and in the request form it says "Ask for the 10 important questions booklet"

    In the headline is says SEVEN critical qualities. - not consistent from headline to offer.

    You just wonder why they wouldn't do a good ad with a great headline.

    Good image like the first.

    A call to action to download or mail in for your "Homeowners Guide to Choosing a Conservatory".

    The only way the second one would work is if it was placed inside a publication on Conservatories and the desire was already there and the reader was deciding between two suppliers but even then the incongruency in the second ad would push me away from choosing the company.

    Best regards,

    Ozi
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  • Profile picture of the author DWolfe
    Looking at Ad # 1, You can picture yourself in a room for all season's. Easier to do business with if some one has cash in had. Pictures tell a story that seems to relate better to the younger generations.

    Ad # 2 The long copy and the fact some one has to mail something in is a big turn off factor except maybe older or more paticular buyers. They may even delay the purchase of the room till they line up several contractors. The plus is the ad is old school copy wiriting that draws more attention to take a second look at it.

    Still favor ad #1 over ad #2 in a fast pace society. How many sites like Amazon have have quality photos first then the details later. That's what I'm going to pick.
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  • Profile picture of the author animal44
    Time frame: The company went into liquidation in 2008. So the ads preceded this time frame. At that time, sniping coupons or phoning freephone was perfectly normal. Websites and downloading free reports was unusual, possibly unheard of in local businesses.

    The big block of text will almost certainly be read far more than the pretty images simply because it doesn't look like an ad. People will only look at the pretty images version if they're about to buy.

    The proposition in the pretty images is scary. "Phone this number for more information" screams "phone to get the hard sell". By contrast the big block of text is "phone for a free report". And you have an even less scary option of sniping the coupon (perfectly normal at the time these ads would've run). The free report would also have wider appeal, e.g. to those who are dreaming of a new conservatory, but not yet ready to buy.

    The combination of more people reading the big block of text and the less scary option would make it a winner by miles.

    Ultimately the real success would be how many actually buy. This cannot be determined with the information provided. In my experience, even today, with downloaded free reports and autoresponders, follow up by local businesses is poor.

    The company likely went under because the bank withdrew funding/overdrafts. 2008 was the banking crisis and many viable businesses went under because the banks withdrew their funding at short notice.

    I doubt this company was Ewan's client, so you're unlikely to get a definitive answer...
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  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
    As has been mentioned before, it would matter where the ad is placed. Is it in a magazine devoted to Conservatories? High end home improvements?

    My guess is that most buyers of conservatories are older people. And older people are used to using the mail.

    Assuming the ad is only run in high end home improvement magazines (or a niche magazine devoted to adding rooms like this)...I would guess that the second ad got more sales.

    As a direct mail ad, I wonder how many headlines were tested with the second ad?. That may explain why there are incongruities in the ad.


    Ewen? Are you going to tell us?
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  • Profile picture of the author DATruk
    Won what? Clicks or conversions?
    I suggest the first one with pics wins in clicks. This is a big money item that people will want to visualize. And since we are talking ads here, SEO won't be the driver of traffic. Not like small ticket items bought off a single ad on a whim. In fact I think many homeowners, the target market, may not even be considering a conservatory or "sun room" until they see the pics. Curiosity will lead them down the funnel to sales.
    "Ooouue I like that" turns into "how do I get that", "how much would it cost?", and so on. Either way, the landing page is where the conversions take place. Maybe the text ad landing page had images, maybe the image ad landing page had text. Who knows?
    Anyway, the purpose of the ad is to get clicks. And I suggest that these images in this market are incredibly powerful. My past in real estate marketing has proven this time over time.
    Darrell

    Edit- I am also assuming these are online ads.
    Edit edit - well now I look again and they are obviously for different mediums. I still stick with the image ads, even in direct mail or paper advertising.
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  • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
    And the WINNER was, the block of text, won by 300%.

    But why folks, why?

    Best,
    Ewen
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

      And the WINNER was, the block of text, won by 300%.

      But why folks, why?

      Best,
      Ewen
      The big answer is that...as ugly as it is...as unappealing as it is....as counter intuitive as it is......copywriting works. A big bold headline that grabs a segment of the readership...pulls them into a story...and concludes with an offer will almost always out sell a display ad created by an advertising agency (which the first ad probably wasn't.)

      And of course, the copy ad created a direct mail sequence...and that's where the sales came from.
      I still think the second ad had multiple headlines tested....but I'm surprised this one worked the best.

      And..I believe the copywritten ad pulled three times better. But that could also mean that the display ad simply sucked badly. And that's why most ad reps (who create these pretty ads) don't talk about tracking ad response. There often isn't any to speak of.

      The copy ad's sub heads are better than the headline, in my opinion. But honestly, I know nothing about the product or audience so I couldn't come up with a better one. The structure of the headline is strong...and "Seven Critical...." starts it off right.



      Thanks Ewen. Why do you think it pulled better?

      Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post


      My guess is that the second ad pulled three to one in actual sales.
      I hear the word Genius bantered around quite a lot. But truthfully, it was my psychic ability that pulled me through.
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    • Profile picture of the author animal44
      Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

      And the WINNER was, the block of text, won by 300%.

      But why folks, why?

      Best,
      Ewen
      I think several factors, however, the biggest one would be "FREE".
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      • Profile picture of the author Win2888DotCom
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    • Profile picture of the author dburk
      Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

      And the WINNER was, the block of text, won by 300%.

      But why folks, why?

      Best,
      Ewen
      Hi Ewen,

      I believe the text ad won mainly because it had a much better headline. The winner uses a headline that is both value-centric and specific. The loser uses a headline that is overly general and quite vague with no specific value mentioned. As a result a lot more people likely read the text ad than read the ad with the vague headline. Lack of clarity is a well known conversion killer.

      The second reason the text ad won is that it has an offer with a clear value proposition, while the loser uses mostly generic sales language while trying to talk up their name rather than build value that the audience is likely to relate to and believe.

      Another contributing factor is that the winning text ad used a lead magnet offer. That ad offered something of value, for free, to build a relationship, rather than a very vague "call to find out more" cryptic offer used in the loser color/image ad.

      People act when they see value in doing so. The loser ad asks for a commitment to action as a condition of finding out if there might be anything of value to the target audience, that was a pretty high hurdle to have to jump through just to find out if there would be an offer they might find valuable to them. Typically, you get a better response by offering value first, before inserting a call-to-action.

      That's my opinion.

      HTH,

      Don Burk
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    • Profile picture of the author c simon
      Was this ad done by Dan Castle?
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      • Profile picture of the author animal44
        Originally Posted by c simon View Post

        Was this ad done by Dan Castle?
        Yes it was. It comes from the Advertorial Formula by Dan Castle...
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  • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
    Hey Claude, recall those pest control postcards I posted
    in which I asked which was the winner...I believe the winner
    of both uses the same principle.

    What do you think it is?

    Best,
    Ewen
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  • Profile picture of the author SARubin
    Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

    And the WINNER was, the block of text, won by 300%.

    But why folks, why?

    Best,
    Ewen

    I'm going to stick with my original reason as to why the text piece was the winner.

    The first one is eye catching, but it looks like an ad that's trying to sell something. The second one looks more like valuable info, to help me make a knowledgeable decision.

    If we were talking about a $30 item, then the pictures and flashy copy would probably be enough to make the most sales. And the text copy would even be overkill, and a turn-off.

    But when you're asking me to spend $30,000, for an addition to my home, then I need to be able to justify the investment with logical reasoning (or at least what I believe is logical reasoning)

    If not for myself, then for my friends and family who ask why I bought it. And why I chose this company.

    Do I want to sound like a chump, and say I bought it because of some flashy ad that looks like it belongs in the back of a tabloid? Or do I tell them I bought it from this company because I intelligently did my research. (without mentioning that most of my research was provided by Maple Leaf)

    Also, I'm going to guess that the free booklet had 10 "important" questions that Maple Leaf could answer yes to; while their competition could not say yes to all of them? (Although, we'll never know for sure, because the booklet probably doesn't exist anymore. But if I was writing it, that's what I would try to do)

    Of course, without more info, my original guess was just that... A guess.

    For all I know, the text piece was a control during a housing boom (I'd guess like in the 80s, since there's no mention of a website anywhere in the ad?) and the picture ad could have gone to print during the financial meltdown of 2008?

    And as most of us know...timing is a always a big factor.
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    • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
      Originally Posted by SARubin View Post


      The first one is eye catching, but it looks like an ad that's trying to sell something. The second one looks more like valuable info, to help me make a knowledgeable decision.

      If we were talking about a $30 item, then the pictures and flashy copy would probably be enough to make the most sales. And the text copy would even be overkill, and a turn-off.

      But when you're asking me to spend $30,000, for an addition to my home, then I need to be able to justify the investment with logical reasoning (or at least what I believe is logical reasoning)
      I've come to the same conclusion too.

      Back in the 70's and 80's Gary Halbert experienced advertorials outsold what looked like ads.

      Nothing has changed.

      The message coming from, what seems an unbiased writer,
      seems must more trustworthy as that from an advertiser.

      Just the reality.

      Best,
      Ewen
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      • Profile picture of the author animal44
        Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

        I've come to the same conclusion too.

        Back in the 70's and 80's Gary Halbert experienced advertorials outsold what looked like ads.

        Nothing has changed.

        The message coming from, what seems an unbiased writer,
        seems must more trustworthy as that from an advertiser.

        Just the reality.

        Best,
        Ewen
        However, if your proposition was the same as the display ad ("phone for further information"), the response would be lower, probably much lower, maybe even equal to the display ad. The free report is low risk, less scary. Having a "phone for recorded message" would also improve response over the "phone for further information". I think that came from Halbert as well...

        Want to increase response even further?

        Put it in the format of a letter. "dear neighbour". Everyone will read a "dear neighbour" letter posted in a local newspaper (or sent as a leaftet). Don't mention conservatories, instead offer free report on "how to add thousands to the value of your home" (much more general appeal).

        The free report would then show them the benefits of a conservatory and how they could easily afford one. Backed up by appropriate testimonials.

        And, of course, you'd have plan B for those who don't buy - JVs with other companies - offers of a new kitchen, a new bathroom, double glazing, anything that could potentially fit the "add thousands to the value of your home"

        There, I've just given you a plan to make you very rich. Send my 20% to...
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      • Profile picture of the author Ron Lafuddy
        Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

        I've come to the same conclusion too.

        Back in the 70's and 80's Gary Halbert experienced advertorials outsold what looked like ads.

        Nothing has changed.

        The message coming from, what seems an unbiased writer,
        seems must more trustworthy as that from an advertiser.

        Just the reality.

        Best,
        Ewen
        I'm not sure about that one, Ewen.

        In any case, I've got a postcard project coming up, where I'm going to test and see what happens.

        Thanks for starting this thread.

        Ron
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      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

        I've come to the same conclusion too.

        Back in the 70's and 80's Gary Halbert experienced advertorials outsold what looked like ads.

        Nothing has changed.

        The message coming from, what seems an unbiased writer,
        seems must more trustworthy as that from an advertiser.


        Just the reality.

        Best,
        Ewen
        Weird. I've seen so many of these (and written a few)..that I keep forgetting that the public doesn't recognize these as ads. In fact, it looks like a consumer warning.

        We become so jaded.
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        • Profile picture of the author Oziboomer
          Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

          Weird. I've seen so many of these (and written a few)..that I keep forgetting that the public doesn't recognize these as ads. In fact, it looks like a consumer warning.

          We become so jaded.
          It's probably also that the person who is going to read the long copy is already likely to be a buyer.

          The "English" which is where this ad would have run would have had the attitude of "You get what you pay for"..... "Remember what your parents said".... ' Get Three quotes" etc.

          Only a serious proactive buyer would read the advertorial copy and even more so send in the booklet request.

          Marketing directly to the people most likely to buy.

          Today the playing field has changed if you think about online.

          Yes Ewen it would be best to put your offer in front of the right audience who are most eager to purchase but there are so many other aspects in play.

          Conditional targeting a prospect throughout the funnel depending on their online interactions etc.

          For sure you can still deliver a direct mail piece or even a crafted online piece that is accurately targeted but the trend does seem to be not away from direct mail or print advertising but a greater data driven approach were the skilled advertiser has information that guides them to send the most appropriate message. . .

          . . . to the most likely suspect at the most auspicious time.

          best regards,

          Ozi
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          • Profile picture of the author Ron Lafuddy
            Originally Posted by Oziboomer View Post

            It's probably also that the person who is going to read the long copy is already likely to be a buyer.

            The "English" which is where this ad would have run would have had the attitude of "You get what you pay for"..... "Remember what your parents said".... ' Get Three quotes" etc.

            Only a serious proactive buyer would read the advertorial copy and even more so send in the booklet request.

            Marketing directly to the people most likely to buy.

            Today the playing field has changed if you think about online.

            Yes Ewen it would be best to put your offer in front of the right audience who are most eager to purchase but there are so many other aspects in play.

            Conditional targeting a prospect throughout the funnel depending on their online interactions etc.

            For sure you can still deliver a direct mail piece or even a crafted online piece that is accurately targeted but the trend does seem to be not away from direct mail or print advertising but a greater data driven approach were the skilled advertiser has information that guides them to send the most appropriate message. . .

            . . . to the most likely suspect at the most auspicious time.

            best regards,

            Ozi
            ...or to the most qualified, i.e. those who have purchased something related.

            Slightly different, maybe, in that we know something about their interests, purchasing power, debt load, age, social circle, and a host of other determining factors.

            The key is, as you said, in fine tuning the data.

            One thing is for sure, you'll come away with one hell of a list.

            Ron
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    • Profile picture of the author Ron Lafuddy
      Originally Posted by SARubin View Post

      I'm going to stick with my original reason as to why the text piece was the winner.

      The first one is eye catching, but it looks like an ad that's trying to sell something. The second one looks more like valuable info, to help me make a knowledgeable decision.

      If we were talking about a $30 item, then the pictures and flashy copy would probably be enough to make the most sales. And the text copy would even be overkill, and a turn-off.

      But when you're asking me to spend $30,000, for an addition to my home, then I need to be able to justify the investment with logical reasoning (or at least what I believe is logical reasoning)

      If not for myself, then for my friends and family who ask why I bought it. And why I chose this company.

      Do I want to sound like a chump, and say I bought it because of some flashy ad that looks like it belongs in the back of a tabloid? Or do I tell them I bought it from this company because I intelligently did my research. (without mentioning that most of my research was provided by Maple Leaf)

      Also, I'm going to guess that the free booklet had 10 "important" questions that Maple Leaf could answer yes to; while their competition could not say yes to all of them? (Although, we'll never know for sure, because the booklet probably doesn't exist anymore. But if I was writing it, that's what I would try to do)

      Of course, without more info, my original guess was just that... A guess.

      For all I know, the text piece was a control during a housing boom (I'd guess like in the 80s, since there's no mention of a website anywhere in the ad?) and the picture ad could have gone to print during the financial meltdown of 2008?

      And as most of us know...timing is a always a big factor.
      That right there may be the biggest reveal in this whole thread.

      Thank you for taking the time to point it out.

      Times have changed since these ads were run. I'm wondering how the attention span of today's average buyer, would stand up to the discipline necessary to read an advertorial.

      Ron
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      • Profile picture of the author SARubin
        Originally Posted by Ron Lafuddy View Post


        Times have changed since these ads were run. I'm wondering how the attention span of today's average buyer, would stand up to the discipline necessary to read an advertorial.

        Ron
        Good point. As a society, it does seem like we've entered an age of "Digitally Induced Attention Deficit Disorder."
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  • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
    All this noise about shorter attention span is true
    in the context of quickly sorting out what's important and what isn't.

    However, if the message is about their favorite subject, in Claude's case,
    comic book heroes, he would be disappointed if it was too short.

    So in the case of this sunroom ad, if the reader is at least half interested in one,
    she will want to read about it in depth.

    That's from a sheep herder's cunning brain.

    Best,
    Ewen
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    • Profile picture of the author Ron Lafuddy
      Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

      All this noise about shorter attention span is true
      in the context of quickly sorting out what's important and what isn't.

      However, if the message is about their favorite subject, in Claude's case,
      comic book heroes, he would be disappointed if it was too short.

      So in the case of this sunroom ad, if the reader is at least half interested in one,
      she will want to read about it in depth.

      That's from a sheep herder's cunning brain.

      Best,
      Ewen
      In Claude's case, take age into account. He may look like he's reading, but he's really napping.

      A chiropractor I work with has been treating young people for back and neck pain caused by
      hunching over their phone. It's become a common problem, that didn't exist just a few short years
      ago.

      Was on my way into the store the other day and this dude, who was at least as old as I am (ancient), walking ahead of me, walked right into one of the support poles for the store. Couldn't be bothered to look up from his phone screen to see where he was going, I guess.

      Anyway, my point is that due to the "always connected" world we live in, the attention span of the general public is shorter than ever. Video is being relied on to fill in the details. Hate him or not, part of Trump's success in communicating with his supporters is the brevity of his tweets. That's the reality.

      This is "new territory" for all of us. We're learning as we go. Thanks for everybody's input in this
      thread.

      Ron
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      • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
        [QUOTE=Ron Lafuddy;11071331 Was on my way into the store the
        other day and this dude, who was at least as old as I am (ancient), walking ahead of me, walked right into one of the support poles for the store. Couldn't be bothered to look up from his screen to see where he was going, I guess.

        [/QUOTE]

        Funny thing, I saw the same thing, a school girl walked straight into
        the sidewalk traffic pole while working her phone!

        Best,
        Ewen
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  • Profile picture of the author AmericanMuscleTA
    The first ad with the pictures makes me want one for my yard! When I read the headline for the second one I was like, "What the heck is a conservatory company?"
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    David Hunter | Duke of Marketing | Retired Real Estate Agent
    www.DukeOfMarketing.com

    www.TheSaviorsMinistry.org

    • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
      Originally Posted by AmericanMuscleTA View Post

      The first ad with the pictures makes me want one for my yard! When I read the headline for the second one I was like, "What the heck is a conservatory company?"
      The people across the ditch would know what a conservatory is.

      Best,
      Ewen
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  • Profile picture of the author DABK
    The ad-style one, the block of text, addresses something lots of people deal with when making a big purchase: fear of hiring a company that will be wasting your money...

    For people not used to building/construction choosing a trustworthy contractor is hard... They don't even begin to know how they can tell... What questions they should answer to get to that... And it does not follow that one good-looking result will yield future good results.

    A construction guy working in Suburb B might have no idea how to get the permits fast in Suburb G, the project might end up taking 5 weeks longer just because of that.

    These days, it's easier, there's yelp and other review sites. But back in 2008?

    The advertorial asks: Do you know how to tell a good construction company from a bad one? And states, if you do not, there's a way, just contact us, and we'll teach you.

    Teachers are not sellers or marketers, right?
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    • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
      Originally Posted by DABK View Post

      The ad-style one, the block of text, addresses something lots of people deal with when making a big purchase: fear of hiring a company that will be wasting your money...
      Yep.

      It's a universal fear, fear of making a mistake as it plays to the scarcity of resources at a primal level... an embarrassment to others for doing it.

      Best,
      Ewen
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  • Profile picture of the author ThePowerHouse
    [DELETED]
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  • Profile picture of the author helisell
    I happen to know [don't ask why] that the 2nd ad was purportedly the winner. The ads are part of a 'how to write great ads' product that was selling about 5-6 years ago in the uk.

    Funny to read that they are now defunct, but in this industry, companies like this come and go and change names/hands on a fairly regular basis.

    I still have the product as a matter of fact and it is a masterpiece on newspaper style advertising.
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    P.M. me if you'd like a three paragraph (max) no holds barred, response to any marketing or sales problem you may have..

    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by helisell View Post

      I happen to know [don't ask why] that the 2nd ad was purportedly the winner. The ads are part of a 'how to write great ads' product that was selling about 5-6 years ago in the uk.

      Funny to read that they are now defunct, but in this industry, companies like this come and go and change names/hands on a fairly regular basis.

      I still have the product as a matter of fact and it is a masterpiece on newspaper style advertising.
      Do you know the name of the product and who wrote it?
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      • Profile picture of the author helisell
        Hi Claude, I've pm'd you with the info.
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        P.M. me if you'd like a three paragraph (max) no holds barred, response to any marketing or sales problem you may have..

  • Profile picture of the author Lota Warria
    Banned
    [DELETED]
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