How to take advantage of this Cheese and Whiskers

Profile picture of the author David Miller by David Miller Posted: 03/23/2012
I'm not going to apologize for calling it BS. It is what it is and if you want to argue the point, there's another thread where you can do it.

Besides the couple of videos that have shown up here, in the last week I've gotten emails about some great new techniques to "never have to cold call again!" and "one technique allowed me to buy a small island in the south pacific"....you know the drill. I usually don't bother with this stuff but I was a little curious and sure enough, cheese and whiskers!

I know these kind of things hit the market in a viral way and it looks like this one is the latest....and it also looks like a lot of people are thinking it's a great idea. If you're not alread aware of my opionion, I believe it's nothing short of bait and switch and I don't believe a single word of the hype.

If there's one credible person here that used or uses this system, I'd like to hear about it. Until that time, I'll stand by my opinion of it.

So here's how you should take advantage of it:

Get on the phone and contact your prospects honestly. Refine you introduction so that you capture your prospects attention quickly. If they are a qualified prospect, they will respond positively.

If they are not qualified, it won't cause any harm, but it's been my experience that when you behave as a professional, even an unqualified prospect can become a source of business down the road.

If they've been getting hammered with all this cheese and whiskers nonsense, I promise you they will welcome a professional approach.
#advantage #cheese #whiskers

  • Profile picture of the author iAmNameLess
    iAmNameLess
    I get tons of stuff every day saying never cold call again, but the author cold calls. Most of the hype out there, is exactly that, hype.
  • Profile picture of the author damasgate
    damasgate
    I actually found a new method that works really good for getting offline clients.

    You wear a ninja suit and sneak into their businesses under the cover of the night and leave them a post-it note on their office.

    I've used this method and it's only gotten me arrested twice.

    Still easier than cold calling.
  • Profile picture of the author ryanmckinney
    ryanmckinney
    Originally Posted by damasgate View Post
    I actually found a new method that works really good for getting offline clients.

    You wear a ninja suit and sneak into their businesses under the cover of the night and leave them a post-it note on the their office.

    I've used this method and it's only gotten my arrested twice.

    Still easier than cold calling.

    Bhahahhaha. This is great. Partly because I love pretending to be a Ninja.

    I can just see someone fast roping through the ceiling , Mission Impossible Style, placing the sticky note on the desk, and zipping back into darkness.

    Ryan
  • Profile picture of the author racso316
    racso316
    Originally Posted by damasgate View Post
    I actually found a new method that works really good for getting offline clients.

    You wear a ninja suit and sneak into their businesses under the cover of the night and leave them a post-it note on the their office.

    I've used this method and it's only gotten my arrested twice.

    Still easier than cold calling.

    Hahaha now that was funny. thanks. That's the future right there brotha.

    Seriously though, delete your message quickly before someone steals your idea and starts selling it as a wso for $7 with an OTO of $100 with JV partners that leave glowing reviews. Or better yet send it to a big time "guru" and he can sell it for $200 or two payments of $97
  • Profile picture of the author robfrancis
    robfrancis
    Originally Posted by David Miller View Post
    I'm not going to apologize for calling it BS...I usually don't bother with this stuff but I was a little curious and sure enough, cheese and whiskers!...I believe it's nothing short of bait and switch...getting hammered with all this cheese and whiskers nonsense
    Thanks, David. I'm getting lots of this now from some big players in IM. Thought I'd come here and see what WF says on it.

    Originally Posted by damasgate View Post
    You wear a ninja suit and sneak into their businesses under the cover of the night and leave them a post-it note on the their office.
    Brilliant! Seeing as it is cheese and whiskers approach, I believe you might want to try dressing up in a giant mouse costume and leave a huge block of swiss cheese the color of a post-it note on their desk. This way you won't get arrested - just keep an eye out for vermin exterminator vans.
  • Profile picture of the author TyBrown
    TyBrown
    Am I the only one who doesn't understand the reference 'cheese and whiskers'?
  • Profile picture of the author vndnbrgj
    vndnbrgj
    Originally Posted by TyBrown View Post
    Am I the only one who doesn't understand the reference 'cheese and whiskers'?
    You would if you watched the video.

    As far as the ninja thing goes... I like to make sure no one sees me leave.
  • Profile picture of the author sandalwood
    sandalwood
    Originally Posted by David Miller View Post
    I'm not going to apologize for calling it BS. It is what it is and if you want to argue the point, there's another thread where you can do it.

    Besides the couple of videos that have shown up here, in the last week I've gotten emails about some great new techniques to "never have to cold call again!" and "one technique allowed me to buy a small island in the south pacific"....you know the drill. I usually don't bother with this stuff but I was a little curious and sure enough, cheese and whiskers!

    I know these kind of things hit the market in a viral way and it looks like this one is the latest....and it also looks like a lot of people are thinking it's a great idea. If you're not alread aware of my opionion, I believe it's nothing short of bait and switch and I don't believe a single word of the hype.

    If there's one credible person here that used or uses this system, I'd like to hear about it. Until that time, I'll stand by my opinion of it.

    So here's how you should take advantage of it:

    Get on the phone and contact your prospects honestly. Refine you introduction so that you capture your prospects attention quickly. If they are a qualified prospect, they will respond positively.

    If they are not qualified, it won't cause any harm, but it's been my experience that when you behave as a professional, even an unqualified prospect can become a source of business down the road.

    If they've been getting hammered with all this cheese and whiskers nonsense, I promise you they will welcome a professional approach.
    David,

    Since I know you are one credible dude, I respect your above posting. I would like to go at this cheese and whiskers thing a little differently. I won't address the hype or the two payments of only 97 dollars each. This is typical of a guru approach to milk the masses of asses who unfortunately don't have much marketing or sales skills.

    In fact, I've only watched two videos about this thing and in one of the videos the speaker actually admits what I just said about milking the asses is absolutely true. Oh well, life isn't fair.

    Here is my take. I don't believe you are BSing the potential client with the approach. Look at Bottom Line Personal and Stansbury Associates (they publish about 899 financially oriented books, newsletters, seminars) just to name two. They all use tantalizing headlines and salacious call to action points and charge in the thousands for their BS.

    If I am correct about C&W, the only difference is their 1st email sets the stage, 2nd email shows the production and the 3rd email puts you in the client's office. It is at this point where you have to put up.

    Let's take their 100 dollar google trick, oops maybe wrong term but maybe not. To those of us who know about it, it seems like a trick. To the potential client it isn't a trick at all. He doesn't even know about the offer and is perfectly fine with paying you $20 to get $100 worth of advertising. Even if he did know about it, he'd probably pay you the $20 because his time is worth more.

    Stock brokers, financial planners, financial advisors, tax prep businesses, lawyers, politicians, arbitrators and the list goes on do it everyday of the week. They tell you they are giving you "peace of mind" "retire early" "get your fair share". To me there isn't much difference.

    I believe if their emails actually get you in the door and you can perform as you say you can, then I don't care what you call your program. C&W has a nice ring to it but so does S&M to a certain set of people.

    Oh, I better qualify this post with a loud I AM NOT associated with C&W in any shape, form or manner. I wasn't paid to write this post and I don't make a dime off anything they sell.

    I watched the 2nd video I mentioned above and picked up some excellent tips. The truth is, their material is available in several WSO's that each asked less than $194. However, if you want to spend 194 go ahead.

    BTW, every guru seems to be putting out a program on how to become the local client gorilla getter. Most of them aren't as adacious in their pricing as C&W but so what, right? Again if a guy wants to spend 194 on stuff he can get for $10 or $7, depending on the guru making the offer, he is free to go there.

    Oh, I better add I don't intend to be a C&W customer. Great ideas, great tools, but, nope, not for 194 given their system of contact is out of a mail order book published in the 70's if memory hasn't failed me.

    Now I think a guy can say their program isn't worth the money but it is worth a looksee. After all, there is money on the floor of horse stalls. My sister used to raise horses and she made extra dough by selling the natural organic fertilizer generated by her fertilizer machines.

    See, all has value but to what degree is probably what you are saying. To that I would agree.

    Anyway, good kind sir, thank you for your post and I hope we can talk again in the future.

    Let me close with a suggestion to anyone who wants to learn how to market and learn for free. Sign up for Paul Meyers talkbiz newsletter. Paul did not pay me to write this post nor do I receive a dime from Paul. I subscribe to his NL, that's it. If you can't learn from Paul, you certainly won't learn from C&W, S&M or P&G.

    OK, I'm finished with my 2 and 3/4ยข...
  • Profile picture of the author Quentin
    Quentin
  • Profile picture of the author bobmcalister
    bobmcalister
    or put on a disguise , like mine...works everytime!
  • Profile picture of the author David Miller
    David Miller
    @sandalwood - I believe there is something that can be learned from just about anything. Many times, particularly with WSO's and "selling systems" you can learn what not to do as well.

    However, this statement of yours:

    "Here is my take. I don't believe you are BSing the potential client with the approach. Look at Bottom Line Personal and Stansbury Associates (they publish about 899 financially oriented books, newsletters, seminars) just to name two. They all use tantalizing headlines and salacious call to action points and charge in the thousands for their BS."

    I'm not familiar with who you mention but let me remind you of the C & W approach:

    1. Get a gmail account (clearly to appear as an ordinary customer inquiry)
    2. Ask a question to make them believe you are interested in becoming a customer

    If you change their approach, it's no longer the system they promote.

    What many people fail to realize is that these "systems" only serve to make it harder for those of us that market products and services properly.

    I will also submit that many businesses have lost business because of these pathetic approaches. Many times I've called a business to ask about their services for my own use and I've been met with suspicion rather than the type of response that I would expect as a potential customer.

    When this happens, I'll ask why I'm getting the 3rd degree from them. Typically, I'll hear a story about how they were "victimized" (their word) by sales people pretending to be a customer.

    There are times when I don't ask why, I'll just move on until I find the business that responds properly.
  • Profile picture of the author Art Turner
    Art Turner
    Originally Posted by TyBrown View Post
    Am I the only one who doesn't understand the reference 'cheese and whiskers'?
    No, you're not the only one. After a little research, the idea seems to be:

    customer equals mouse
    cheese equals something the mouse (customer) wants
    whiskers equals cat, something the mouse (customer) doesn't want

    The approach (and I'm not a fan of it) is to present yourself as something the customer wants and hide the fact you're really something they want to avoid.
  • Profile picture of the author sandalwood
    sandalwood
    David,

    Regarding:

    "I'm not familiar with who you mention..."

    that's alright you don't have to be. These are folks who take what you say in bullet points 1 & 2 below to the max. They will b.s. you until you are blue in the face. C&W simply made a suggestion that really isn't that far off the wall, again according to me.

    Regarding the remainder of your sentence:

    "but let me remind you of the C & W approach:

    1. Get a gmail account (clearly to appear as an ordinary customer inquiry)
    2. Ask a question to make them believe you are interested in becoming a customer"

    Yes, that is what they said. I don't see it as much of a problem given I use a gmail account and tell the people it is a gmail account. If I happen to forget to mention it, no harm no foul.

    As for #2, well, that could or could not be some what dubious. I know I don't have any qualms about asking questions and making them think I am a potential customer because I am a potential customer. My prospecting adventures have taught me who I will do business with and who I wouldn't use even if their service was free.

    I use it as a learning tool. How does the merchant react to inquiries is important to me. I own an insurance agency and believe me when I say we've been shopped, lied to, accused and a whole bunch more by "potential" customers. Hell, at one time I could identify the agency or agencies calling us to get an idea of what we were quoting company and price wise.

    Hell, it happens. People call it legally spying on your competition. Now, back to C&W. Like I said in my reply, if you can actually make a difference in the client's business and do what you say, you haven't, in areligious sense, lied to anyone.

    But that is how I think. As a former successful stock broker I will only say you should have been in the 30 day training course we had to attend before we could start selling. C&W is almost non-existent compared to that bunch of bandits.

    Anyway my friend, I appreciate the dialogue. I just don't see the depth of deception as compared to what others are doing. Personally I tell everybody upfront what I can do and ask for the order. I actually want them to know me and refer as many friends as possible.

    The C&W method seems to make it easier to get in the door. I guess only the market will let us know if it has staying power.

    Have a great day.

    Tom
  • Profile picture of the author globalpro
    globalpro
    Originally Posted by damasgate View Post
    You wear a ninja suit and sneak into their businesses under the cover of the night and leave them a post-it note on the their office.
    Maybe a variation of this would be to ninja into their office while they are there and karate chop the money out of them.

    Then they are a long term customer who pays every month for fear of you coming back and karate chopping them some more.

    Always looking for new sales approaches.

    Thanks,

    John
  • Profile picture of the author RRG
    RRG
    Originally Posted by sandalwood View Post
    David,

    Regarding:

    "I'm not familiar with who you mention..."

    that's alright you don't have to be. These are folks who take what you say in bullet points 1 & 2 below to the max. They will b.s. you until you are blue in the face. C&W simply made a suggestion that really isn't that far off the wall, again according to me.

    Regarding the remainder of your sentence:

    "but let me remind you of the C & W approach:

    1. Get a gmail account (clearly to appear as an ordinary customer inquiry)
    2. Ask a question to make them believe you are interested in becoming a customer"

    Yes, that is what they said. I don't see it as much of a problem given I use a gmail account and tell the people it is a gmail account. If I happen to forget to mention it, no harm no foul.

    As for #2, well, that could or could not be some what dubious. I know I don't have any qualms about asking questions and making them think I am a potential customer because I am a potential customer. My prospecting adventures have taught me who I will do business with and who I wouldn't use even if their service was free.

    I use it as a learning tool. How does the merchant react to inquiries is important to me. I own an insurance agency and believe me when I say we've been shopped, lied to, accused and a whole bunch more by "potential" customers. Hell, at one time I could identify the agency or agencies calling us to get an idea of what we were quoting company and price wise.

    Hell, it happens. People call it legally spying on your competition. Now, back to C&W. Like I said in my reply, if you can actually make a difference in the client's business and do what you say, you haven't, in areligious sense, lied to anyone.

    But that is how I think. As a former successful stock broker I will only say you should have been in the 30 day training course we had to attend before we could start selling. C&W is almost non-existent compared to that bunch of bandits.

    Anyway my friend, I appreciate the dialogue. I just don't see the depth of deception as compared to what others are doing. Personally I tell everybody upfront what I can do and ask for the order. I actually want them to know me and refer as many friends as possible.

    The C&W method seems to make it easier to get in the door. I guess only the market will let us know if it has staying power.

    Have a great day.

    Tom
    It's one thing to surreptitiously "shop" the competition.

    It's quite another to pose as a customer who wants to buy something (bait) and then try to sell them something (switch).

    How do you feel when someone attempts to start a new relationship with deception?
  • Profile picture of the author RentItNow
    RentItNow
    David, I'm sorry but I was a really good worker this week and deleted all my big name marketers emails..likely for the same reason as you...I know their tricks and tend to ignore them lately. Can you let me know what this thread is referring to?
  • Profile picture of the author David Miller
    David Miller
    Originally Posted by RentItNow View Post
    David, I'm sorry but I was a really good worker this week and deleted all my big name marketers emails..likely for the same reason as you...I know their tricks and tend to ignore them lately. Can you let me know what this thread is referring to?
    It's a result of the cheese and whiskers video POS marketing method in this thread:

    http://www.warriorforum.com/offline-...hod-video.html
  • Profile picture of the author sandalwood
    sandalwood
    Originally Posted by RRG View Post
    It's one thing to surreptitiously "shop" the competition.

    It's quite another to pose as a customer who wants to buy something (bait) and then try to sell them something (switch).

    How do you feel when someone attempts to start a new relationship with deception?
    I don't quite understand what you meany by your first sentence. Are you saying you can perform spying and other black hat tactics using the umbrella of shopping surreptitiously and it is OK?

    As for sentence two, I"ll agree if that is the intent. Intent use to be the cornerstone of all trials. The prosecutor had to prove intent. Today all he needs is someone complaining and that solves the intent issue. I use this line from numerous court cases on the matter. It is frightening to see how far we've digressed.

    It is my understanding that posing as a customer isn't deception unless you are attempting to gain trade secrets or proprietary information. Posing as a customer is an awkward way to get your foot in the door I will agree. Once recognized it is usually met with stern rejection.

    Again, my point is if the perpetrator actually performs for the "duped" biz owner, that is, increases his business, raises his google standing, builds him a satsifactory website, so the hell what. Both win.

    As for your third question, well, that is a rhetorical attempt with no meaning. All religions attempt to start a new relationship based on deception. How do you feel about that?

    All political parties attempt to start a new relationship based on deception. How do you feel about that?

    All environmentalists attempt to start a new relationship based on deception. How do you feel about that?

    Get the point. We can go on for hours but why? It truly isn't deception. It is an attempt to open a dialogue that probably would not be open otherwise. This hopefully results in a win-win relationship for all parties. From what I saw in the video, even the big time guru admitted such. He wanted to be sure the client came out smelling like a rose (my words). Try asking your bank or stock broker to do the same thing. When they stop laughing you'll have aged 20 years.

    Just my random thoughts to your questions. I am always open to a dialogue. PM me and I'll give you my phone number. If you care to call, we will continue the conversation. Otherwise I don't believe I'll take up any more of this thread answering these type questions.
  • Profile picture of the author David Miller
    David Miller
    @sandalwood - The fact that something is done with some regularity does not make it right. Although you point to religion and politics as examples, I will make it my point not to discuss those examples. Those topics are off the table in business for a reason.

    The bottom line as I see it is quite simple. If a product or service can only be introduced to a potential buyer by deception, the product or service cannot be of enough value to stand on its own.

    If the reason its being introduced that way is because the person introducing it has no sales ability, it still doesn't justify the tactic. The sales process and the sales person is representative of the product. If he or she can't present it properly, it's the responsibility of the firm producing the product or service to either find a salesperson that can do the job properly, or provide proper training to the salesperson they have.
  • Profile picture of the author payoman
    payoman
    Originally Posted by David Miller View Post
    @sandalwood - The fact that something is done with some regularity does not make it right. Although you point to religion and politics as examples, I will make it my point not to discuss those examples. Those topics are off the table in business for a reason.

    The bottom line as I see it is quite simple. If a product or service can only be introduced to a potential buyer by deception, the product or service cannot be of enough value to stand on its own.

    If the reason its being introduced that way is because the person introducing it has no sales ability, it still doesn't justify the tactic. The sales process and the sales person is representative of the product. If he or she can't present it properly, it's the responsibility of the firm producing the product or service to either find a salesperson that can do the job properly, or provide proper training to the salesperson they have.
    David, I read a great quote by a really wealthy internet marketer who sold fitness ebooks using the head line 'lose bellyfat by following this 1 weird tip' (the ebook had a complete fitness regimen inside including exercise and healthy eating, just like any other exercise/fitness book) :

    "I sell a customer on their wish, but I deliver them the manual"

    or something to that extent, I read it ages ago.

    The point is, doesn't sales copy do this all the time? Say one thing but the reality isn't QUITE what we imagine? Headlines? Television advertisements with beautiful models?

    To some degree, it's all smoke and mirrors designed to PIQUE INTEREST. Because that's the key with anything in life that INSPIRES you to action; you want to see a RESULT, you aren't that interested in the process.

    The process of increasing your marketing spending to generate leads from the internet isn't INSPIRING, it's the outcome of having 10/20/30 new cusomters a month and what that can do for you.

    So presenting the RESULT upfront has a much HIGHER conversion than presenting the SALES PROCESS up front, don't you think?

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