what is 1k 2k 3k income??

Profile picture of the author rafiseo by rafiseo Posted: 04/05/2011
I here people are talking about 1k 2k 3k income. Actually what is it? USD=US dollar, GBP=British Pound. So k=Korean money? If it is then why Korean money? Whats the reason to use Korean currency to indicate amount of money?? :confused:
#income

  • Profile picture of the author links900
    links900
    well 1k or 2k has nothing to do with currency. It simply means 1000 or 2000.Most of the times when someone mention 1k income normally it means 1000 US Dollars.
    I hope it is helpful to you
  • Profile picture of the author kushroller
    kushroller
    k=korean money? :confused:
    lolololololol!!!
  • Profile picture of the author simonbuzz
    simonbuzz
    that's really a funny question...lol
  • Profile picture of the author fmathd
    fmathd
    LOL!
    Very funny question.
    Korean money is very funny.



    I hope you were just joking if not , then It is in US dollars.
  • Profile picture of the author williamrs
    williamrs
    It's good, it shows that the OP isn't addicted to online poker. Otherwise, he would be familiar with the 1K chips.
  • Profile picture of the author rafiseo
    rafiseo
    Now this question is looking lil bit funny to me too...

    Thanks to links900 for answering my question not insulting me like others.. But K stands for what??
  • Profile picture of the author .Fernando
    .Fernando
    Originally Posted by rafiseo View Post
    Now this question is looking lil bit funny to me too...

    Thanks to links900 for answering my question not insulting me like others.. But K stands for what??
    K = Kilo

    1000 grams = 1 Kilograms
    1000 "moneys" = 1 "K"
  • Profile picture of the author rafiseo
    rafiseo
    Originally Posted by .Fernando View Post
    K = Kilo

    1000 grams = 1 Kilograms
    1000 "moneys" = 1 "K"
    I c. Tanx Fernando...
  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    Kay King
    When saying 1k, 2k etc - "k" stands for "thousand dollars"

    1k is one thousand dollars

    100k is one hundred thousand dollars on this forum

    Money goes by value, not weight
  • Profile picture of the author oogyboogawa
    oogyboogawa
    Originally Posted by Kay King View Post
    When saying 1k, 2k etc - "k" stands for "thousand dollars"

    1k is one thousand dollars

    100k is one hundred thousand dollars on this forum

    Money goes by value, not weight
    "kilo" doesn't always mean kilogram though - Fernando was just using that as an example. It could be kilometer (1000 meters) kiloliter(1000 liters) etc. It's just a term that means thousand. 'K' is simply an abrieviation for kilo whether you're talking about weight, distance, volume, or cash.
  • Profile picture of the author eric w
    eric w
    The "k" is very popular in the usa to indicate thousand, specifically in money...us dollars

    So, when I say i had a 1k month..it usually means I made 1,000 us dollars that month.

    When I say I had 1k visitors to my site..it means I had 1,000 visitors to my site.

    I hope that helps...

    eric w
  • Profile picture of the author rafiseo
    rafiseo
    Thanks to all for giving awesome answers... :-)
  • Profile picture of the author WAWarrior
    WAWarrior
    When $$ is being mentioned., it typically refers to USD.
  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    Kay King
    It could be kilometer (1000 meters) kiloliter(1000 liters) etc. It's just a term that means thousand. 'K' is simply an abrieviation for kilo whether you're talking about weight, distance, volume, or cash.
    Yes, of course kilo means thousand - but when you are saying 1k and using US dollars - you don't say 1 kilo dollars. You say 1 thousand dollars.

    You could say 1 kilo dollars - but people in the US would look at you like "what's his problem".... because we've never changed to the metric system.
  • Profile picture of the author oogyboogawa
    oogyboogawa
    Originally Posted by Kay King View Post
    Yes, of course kilo means thousand - but when you are saying 1k and using US dollars - you don't say 1 kilo dollars. You say 1 thousand dollars.

    You could say 1 kilo dollars - but people in the US would look at you like "what's his problem".... because we've never changed to the metric system.


    I would never say "National Aeronautics and Space Administration" in a normal conversation either, but that doesn't mean that's not what NASA stands for.

    The "k" stands for "kilo" whether we would normally use that in our speech or not. Besides, I wouldn't generally say "I made 1k last month" if I was talking out loud either, I would actually use the word thousand - but when typing people use abbreviations in ways they wouldn't use in speech.
  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    Kay King
    The "k" for thousand is used in speech in the U.S. - usually for higher amounts. You wouldn't say "1k", you would say one thousand - but it's not unusual in business conversations especially to refer to 15k or 100k, etc. This is used for money but also when discussing product quantities shipped, etc. It's not a right/wrong issue to argue - it depends on where you are located.
  • Profile picture of the author SEO Professor
    SEO Professor
    Originally Posted by oogyboogawa View Post
    "kilo" doesn't always mean kilogram though - Fernando was just using that as an example. It could be kilometer (1000 meters) kiloliter(1000 liters) etc. It's just a term that means thousand. 'K' is simply an abrieviation for kilo whether you're talking about weight, distance, volume, or cash.
    Nice explanation!!!
  • Profile picture of the author oogyboogawa
    oogyboogawa
    Originally Posted by Kay King View Post
    The "k" for thousand is used in speech in the U.S. - usually for higher amounts. You wouldn't say "1k", you would say one thousand - but it's not unusual in business conversations especially to refer to 15k or 100k, etc. This is used for money but also when discussing product quantities shipped, etc. It's not a right/wrong issue to argue - it depends on where you are located.


    Why do you keep assuming you're the only one that can understand how things work in the US like because you live there you are an authority on it. Reality check - I live in the U.S. too and my reasoning for what the "k" stands for has ABSOLUTELY nothing to do with location.

    You are using some of ridiculous logic for arguing that "k" doesn't stand for "kilo".

    And my point wasn't that you can't use it for money. I clearly said that you could and that it was used for many things. But regardless of how it is used, it does stand for "kilo".

    It's really not that big of a deal and I'm fine with it if you want to believe for whatever reason that "k" doesn't stand for "kilo" but the fact that you are arguing that it doesn't on a thread where someone is asking for information and seeking knowledge is what gets me.

    Ultimately either belief gets you to the same points: If someones says they made 3k, that means $3,000. But you're being willfully ignorant here to try and make an argument that it doesn't stand for kilo.
  • Profile picture of the author amirsen
    amirsen
    Its really not a exact simple or currency but that mean 1k =1000, 2k=2000 and 3k =3000 Rs.
  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    Kay King
    Why do you keep assuming you're the only one that can understand how things work in the US like because you live there you are an authority on it.

    You are using some of ridiculous logic for arguing that "k" doesn't stand for "kilo".
    No, I didn't - what I said was in the U.S. the common terminology or reference for 1k is "thousand". That's not earth shattering information. Thousand and kilo mean the same thing. Why is it surprising I would have some knowledge how my (first) language is used in the country where I've lived all my life...silly me.

    I have no idea where you live - no name, no location listed. If you do live in the US, you know the metric system is not in common use here. As it seems important to you to be "right" - it's fine with me as I don't have a dog in this hunt and you clearly do.

    kay

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