9 replies
Hi there!

So, I've recently started working on a business advice site for UK businesses and I noticed there are quite a lot of high 'average bids' when I was doing keyword research.

If I were to apply for AdSense in the future and the articles were optimised for some of those keywords, what would be the chances of the right ads showing?

For example:

An article on business gas suppliers - one of the average bids for one of the keywords was £30+ Does that mean I could expect a huge CPC on an advert that was targeted for that keyword? Or is the average bid thing a bit of a myth?

I hope I'm making sense, just want to get my head around it.

Thanks in advance
#average #bid
  • Profile picture of the author dave_hermansen
    We usually start at half of what Google says the average bid is and inch our way up until we get into one of the top of page one ad positions. The bid to get there is never as high as Google says it is.
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    • Profile picture of the author RebeccaSpills
      Originally Posted by dave_hermansen View Post

      We usually start at half of what Google says the average bid is and inch our way up until we get into one of the top of page one ad positions. The bid to get there is never as high as Google says it is.
      Thanks a lot! I always find the 'bidding' process extremely difficult to get my head around. I'm sure I'll get there eventually
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  • Profile picture of the author Bright Future
    Hi, Rebecca

    This is a very complex question but the 2 most important things you need to take into account are:

    1) The bids that the keyword planner shows are for Google Search ads. Obviously someone who searches for a business gas supplier on Google is potentially a very valuable customer. Much more than someone who clicks on a display ad next to an article about business gas suppliers. While a high suggested bid amount does mean that the keyword is valuable to many advertisers, it doesn't really tell you how much you could earn per display click. In general, it could mean higher earnings per click but most likely not even close to £30.

    2) The Adsense ads which show up on your site aren't always related to the content of your site. Advertisers have many different targeting options. Keyword and topic targeting are the ones which match ads with related content but there are also interest targeting and demographic targeting which means that someone on your site could see an ad which is relevant to him while completely unrelated to your content. Not to mention remarketing ads which are very popular.
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    • Profile picture of the author RebeccaSpills
      Originally Posted by Bright Future View Post

      Hi, Rebecca

      This is a very complex question but the 2 most important things you need to take into account are:

      1) The bids that the keyword planner shows are for Google Search ads. Obviously someone who searches for a business gas supplier on Google is potentially a very valuable customer. Much more than someone who clicks on a display ad next to an article about business gas suppliers. While a high suggested bid amount does mean that the keyword is valuable to many advertisers, it doesn't really tell you how much you could earn per display click. In general, it could mean higher earnings per click but most likely not even close to £30.

      2) The Adsense ads which show up on your site aren't always related to the content of your site. Advertisers have many different targeting options. Keyword and topic targeting are the ones which match ads with related content but there are also interest targeting and demographic targeting which means that someone on your site could see an ad which is relevant to him while completely unrelated to your content. Not to mention remarketing ads which are very popular.
      This is really helpful to know, thank you. Is there a way of stopping certain ads from showing? Such as remarketing? Or do you suggest just letting Google do their thing?

      Sorry for all the questions, just trying to learn as much as I can about ads before I incorporate them on my site!
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  • Profile picture of the author Bright Future
    You cannot opt out of remarketing (and you shouldn't anyways because these can be some of the more expensive clicks) but you can block ads based on users’ interests and demographics. You can even block ads leading to specific URLs if you don't like a particular ad on your site.

    However, I've never done it and I don't think that you should. AdWords is an auction where all the different advertisers compete for clicks and theoretically if you exclude some of the participants, you end up earning less.
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    • Profile picture of the author RebeccaSpills
      Originally Posted by Bright Future View Post

      You cannot opt out of remarketing (and you shouldn't anyways because these can be some of the more expensive clicks) but you can block ads based on users' interests and demographics. You can even block ads leading to specific URLs if you don't like a particular ad on your site.

      However, I've never done it and I don't think that you should. AdWords is an auction where all the different advertisers compete for clicks and theoretically if you exclude some of the participants, you end up earning less.
      Perfect, thanks so much for all of your advice - that's extremely helpful!

      One more question (I promise). Do you think it's more profitable to use Google Ads or to advertise relevant affiliate products/services specifically within content? At the moment I've been adding in a relevant B2B product or service within big guide posts, when I think it's relevant. Is this a better route to go down than Google Ads? I don't want to overload people with dozens of adverts, so would prefer to use one over the other.
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  • Profile picture of the author Bright Future
    It's impossible to say what's more profitable for you without any testing.

    Adsense is sort of a lazy monetization method and you need lots of traffic to earn any significant amount. But it's also easier to get someone to click an ad rather than to click and buy something.

    I personally use Adsense + Amazon affiliate and I like both of them. And I didn't feel like adding Amazon affiliate offers hurt my Adsense revenue, so I'm happy to use both at the same time.
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  • Profile picture of the author ChrisBa
    Originally Posted by RebeccaSpills View Post

    Hi there!

    So, I've recently started working on a business advice site for UK businesses and I noticed there are quite a lot of high 'average bids' when I was doing keyword research.

    If I were to apply for AdSense in the future and the articles were optimised for some of those keywords, what would be the chances of the right ads showing?

    For example:

    An article on business gas suppliers - one of the average bids for one of the keywords was £30+ Does that mean I could expect a huge CPC on an advert that was targeted for that keyword? Or is the average bid thing a bit of a myth?

    I hope I'm making sense, just want to get my head around it.

    Thanks in advance
    The only way to know is to try it. It sounds like a good idea and it's worth trying.
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  • Profile picture of the author BeingSwaggatron
    If Google Ads have worked well for you in the past, then it should be good. Google Ads are the widely used since they are linked to everything everyone uses on the internet. However, try other option in case you fail any Google regulations.
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