Using google Adwords campaign for Dad's business

19 replies
Hey guys new to internet marketing and this forum. My dad owns a bulk chemical distribution business with an actual location and also a website, which is not an e-commerce store, but has a contact form in it. I want to do a google ad words campaign for relevant keywords. Would this be a viable method to generate conversions as in phone calls, sales, or leads? What should I watch out for, and where should I look for information. I have been going through the adwords certified fundamentals study guide and reading it as well. Do I want the campaign to also run on the google display network as well as the search network. What kind of negative keywords should I include? How best to monitor conversions? I was thinking after someone complete a contact form, but would it also be a good idea to look into turning the website into a ecommerce store?
#adwords #business #campaign #dad #google
  • Profile picture of the author AlexanderSaroyan
    Banned
    Google Adwords is powerful to go but need to know a little more and also There are Microsoft or Bing Ads which are awesome as well!

    Good Luck!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9436543].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author dannytaki
      What do you think a good daily budget would be? I was thinking $10-$50. I attended a talk here where I live where the speaker recommended a $50 daily budget because otherwise you won't get enough useful information to make better decisions. Can you point me in a direction that was helpful for you?
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9436661].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author ChrisBa
    I think it's worth a try, if anything it should help get the name out there
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9436733].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author dannytaki
      Originally Posted by ChrisBa View Post

      I think it's worth a try, if anything it should help get the name out there
      Great! Good to hear I'm not too far off base here and this isn't a pie in the sky idea. Should I post the website on this forum and see if anyone can give useful advice?
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9436789].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author drewfioravanti
    Here's the best advice you're gonna get: The AdWords Certification only teaches you how to use their system.

    I can tell already that you're going to fail. I don't want to burst your bubble. And I don't want to be rude.

    You don't have any idea how to market and advertise. You are going to lose your money. And, in the process, you're going to convince yourself that it doesn't work. When, the reality is that it may or not, but a flawed test nets flawed results.

    Do people even look to buy bulk chemicals online? What is the sales process like now?

    Before you even consider spending money on marketing or advertising, you have to decide if your business model and sales process will work online. And then how to implement it online. And if people are actually online looking for the products you sell. I have no idea.

    Decide that first.

    Then...christ. I need to make a newbies guide to AdWords product. Anyway, go read Perry Marshall. I think he's a bit of a hack and is riding success he made when the rules were totally different. But, it's probably good advice for a novice AdWords user. Don't buy his expensive courses but you can probably get his AdWords guide for $10-$20. Pretty sure they're on Amazon, too.

    And, as for the guy whole said you should spend $50 testing...that is a completely arbitrary number that provides no value to anyone. Every market is different and will require a different budget. Maybe it's his way of getting clients in with a small investment. Dunno. But, that's what it sounds like.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9436887].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author dannytaki
      Whoa! Thanks for the replies guys a lot of great advice!

      Originally Posted by drewfioravanti View Post

      Here's the best advice you're gonna get: The AdWords Certification only teaches you how to use their system.

      I can tell already that you're going to fail. I don't want to burst your bubble. And I don't want to be rude.

      You don't have any idea how to market and advertise. You are going to lose your money. And, in the process, you're going to convince yourself that it doesn't work. When, the reality is that it may or not, but a flawed test nets flawed results.
      Thanks for giving me a nice dose of reality .
      I'm not ready yet, and know that, to actually start pledging cash to this idea, however, I want to gauge if it's a viable option, and how to go about learning more to make it a reality.
      Originally Posted by drewfioravanti View Post

      Do people even look to buy bulk chemicals online? What is the sales process like now?
      Yes, people do buy online as they also sell smaller quantities on eBay and Amazon, but also sell large volume orders. Here is the website to give you an idea. Alliance Chemical – Austin TX Chemical Distributor

      Originally Posted by drewfioravanti View Post

      Before you even consider spending money on marketing or advertising, you have to decide if your business model and sales process will work online. And then how to implement it online. And if people are actually online looking for the products you sell. I have no idea.

      Decide that first.
      Yes, thanks, I definitely need to learn more about the existing sale process. How would I find out if people are looking for the products we are selling online, without some testing?


      Originally Posted by drewfioravanti View Post

      Then...christ. I need to make a newbies guide to AdWords product. Anyway, go read Perry Marshall. I think he's a bit of a hack and is riding success he made when the rules were totally different. But, it's probably good advice for a novice AdWords user. Don't buy his expensive courses but you can probably get his AdWords guide for $10-$20. Pretty sure they're on Amazon, too.

      And, as for the guy whole said you should spend $50 testing...that is a completely arbitrary number that provides no value to anyone. Every market is different and will require a different budget. Maybe it's his way of getting clients in with a small investment. Dunno. But, that's what it sounds like.
      Perry Marshall, ok I'll check it out for sure! Thank you! As for the the talk it was done by Ryan Pitylak (CEO of Unique Influence).
      I think the $50 daily budget was a recommendation for one of the audience member's small business in computer repair, and perhaps was completely inapplicable to my dad's business, but here is a link to the event talk.
      LifeSize UVC Video Center - AUSOME- August 6, 2014
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9437713].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author dannytaki
      Originally Posted by drewfioravanti View Post


      Then...christ. I need to make a newbies guide to AdWords product. Anyway, go read Perry Marshall. I think he's a bit of a hack and is riding success he made when the rules were totally different. But, it's probably good advice for a novice AdWords user. Don't buy his expensive courses but you can probably get his AdWords guide for $10-$20. Pretty sure they're on Amazon, too.
      I've been reading Perry Marshall book 'definitive guide google adwords', and in it he recommends a few sites: https://my.wordtracker.com/sign-up, Search Marketing Research & Tracking | SpyFu SEM Tools, inventory.overture.com; to research keyword traffic and spy on the competition's keyword bidding. However, I think the book is not recent since often the examples are not the google adwords interface I see. Are these websites also still useful and relevant?
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9440854].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Greedy
    It is worth a shot, I don't know much about your Dad's business beside's what you have listed, but Adwords is the highest quality traffic you can find online. Make sure you take your time to learn the ins and out before dumping a bunch of money into it.

    Be sure to review and understand all the settings, and all features. This will help you edge out your competition.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9437067].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author dannytaki
      Originally Posted by Greedy View Post

      It is worth a shot, I don't know much about your Dad's business beside's what you have listed, but Adwords is the highest quality traffic you can find online. Make sure you take your time to learn the ins and out before dumping a bunch of money into it.

      Be sure to review and understand all the settings, and all features. This will help you edge out your competition.
      Thanks for the feedback Greedy I'll take my time!
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9437720].message }}
  • What is the desired action? What would visitors expect to do in this case?

    Usually, people are searching for something to buy and expect to buy right off the site. So offer them that choice. If that's what they want and expect, they won't call or fill the form.

    My guess in this case since you say it's chemicals and probably very unique stuff. If it's sold to businesses, my guess these would likely call you to place an order, especially if it's hundreds or thousands of dollars. But you may still get a few that place online orders. Have both and see what happens.

    The idea is to give them the information they need no matter the product or how you want them to buy, online or by phone. I've seen too many sites where there's a list of products but no information, no price, just a contact form and/or phone number. I am less likely to do either.

    For example, just today spoke with a potential new client coincidentally (or maybe not so, is your dad from the Midwest?) selling industrial lubricants and other chemicals for machinery, particularly farm machinery. Unfortunately, he has under Tractor Hydrolic Fluid page just that, nothing else. No brands, no details (I assume there are different kinds for different tractors) and no price. Hence, I don't have the information I need to make a buying decision and I look elsewhere.

    Forget about the certified fundamentals. That stuff covers just how to get around the interface and if you know and understand the rules. It doesn't really tell you about keyword selection or what makes great ads. This certification is for guys like me so I can boast to clients but doesn't mean I know what I'm doing.

    I can say the same for the few books I've seen, including Perry Marshall's. They don't really cover much about how to create a good campaign. Doesn't mean you won't learn anything from them. You will since you are new but you'll stumble.

    The display network is good as an awareness campaign, much like radio, TV and newspaper ads. That's what the car companies are doing and companies like McDonalds. If you have a new product that is unlikely to be searched (say, to be silly, an ejector seat on a car), you'd use the display to let people know this exists.

    Best to use search to grab those that are searching for your products. It may work in your case for some of your products, I don't know, it depends on what you want to do and your products.

    As for budget, there's no answer to that. I recommend the most you can afford. For what your dad is selling, doesn't sound like $10 would be much as I assume chemical keywords could be a few dollars. But I certainly won't say you need to have a certain budget. It would be an arbitrary number as Drew said. Budgets can be adjusted and should as your situation changes.

    There's lots there so if you are inclined to learn and to make some mistakes along the way, go for it. Otherwise, get professional help to get started.

    I certainly would try PPC but only after you make changes to the site. I believe most anything can be advertised on PPC and people will buy it. Why? Because as previously mentioned, it can provide high quality traffic (read: traffic that converts).
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9437221].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author dannytaki
      Originally Posted by LucidWebMarketing View Post

      What is the desired action? What would visitors expect to do in this case?
      Here is the website: Alliance Chemical – Austin TX Chemical Distributor. As of now, the only desired action a potential customer could take is filling out a contact form if they are interested in purchasing a product, or place a call to the company.

      Originally Posted by LucidWebMarketing View Post

      Usually, people are searching for something to buy and expect to buy right off the site. So offer them that choice. If that's what they want and expect, they won't call or fill the form.
      Yes, I want to do this, but I have a feeling it will be challenging.

      Originally Posted by LucidWebMarketing View Post

      My guess in this case since you say it's chemicals and probably very unique stuff. If it's sold to businesses, my guess these would likely call you to place an order, especially if it's hundreds or thousands of dollars. But you may still get a few that place online orders. Have both and see what happens.
      Yep, that's exactly right!

      Originally Posted by LucidWebMarketing View Post

      The idea is to give them the information they need no matter the product or how you want them to buy, online or by phone. I've seen too many sites where there's a list of products but no information, no price, just a contact form and/or phone number. I am less likely to do either.

      For example, just today spoke with a potential new client coincidentally (or maybe not so, is your dad from the Midwest?) selling industrial lubricants and other chemicals for machinery, particularly farm machinery. Unfortunately, he has under Tractor Hydrolic Fluid page just that, nothing else. No brands, no details (I assume there are different kinds for different tractors) and no price. Hence, I don't have the information I need to make a buying decision and I look elsewhere.
      Not my dad's place, haha, he's in Texas.
      Originally Posted by LucidWebMarketing View Post

      Forget about the certified fundamentals. That stuff covers just how to get around the interface and if you know and understand the rules. It doesn't really tell you about keyword selection or what makes great ads. This certification is for guys like me so I can boast to clients but doesn't mean I know what I'm doing.

      I can say the same for the few books I've seen, including Perry Marshall's. They don't really cover much about how to create a good campaign. Doesn't mean you won't learn anything from them. You will since you are new but you'll stumble.

      The display network is good as an awareness campaign, much like radio, TV and newspaper ads. That's what the car companies are doing and companies like McDonalds. If you have a new product that is unlikely to be searched (say, to be silly, an ejector seat on a car), you'd use the display to let people know this exists.

      Best to use search to grab those that are searching for your products. It may work in your case for some of your products, I don't know, it depends on what you want to do and your products.

      As for budget, there's no answer to that. I recommend the most you can afford. For what your dad is selling, doesn't sound like $10 would be much as I assume chemical keywords could be a few dollars. But I certainly won't say you need to have a certain budget. It would be an arbitrary number as Drew said. Budgets can be adjusted and should as your situation changes.

      There's lots there so if you are inclined to learn and to make some mistakes along the way, go for it. Otherwise, get professional help to get started.

      I certainly would try PPC but only after you make changes to the site. I believe most anything can be advertised on PPC and people will buy it. Why? Because as previously mentioned, it can provide high quality traffic (read: traffic that converts).

      Awesome advice! Thanks! Yes I am willing to make mistakes and fully expect to maybe get zero results. This isn't a last ditch effort to save a crumbling business. Just something I have the okay to play with to maybe get some results and learn about PPC advertising. I can see a lot worse ways to lose money.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9437749].message }}
  • As I thought, most of the products are not the sort of thing a consumer would need or even know about. Highly specialized stuff it seems.

    As suspected too, there is just a list of products. If I want to buy aircraft deicing fluid (virtually the only thing I see on the list that I know what it is), I want to know the brands you carry, the amounts I can buy and an idea of the price. There's nothing of that. It may not matter much for most of this stuff (probably delivered in tankers) but you still have to give the visitor information about each product. That's how you build a relationship and trust.

    >> I have a feeling it will be challenging.

    It always is. That's what makes it fun.

    Back to the display network, doesn't look like I would use it in this case. I would recommend starting with the search network. Actually, I recommend getting help (I'm available) and save you time, money and trouble.

    One other thing I recognize is solder and solder flux, having tinkered in electronics as a youth. Provided you sell in small amounts (I used to buy spools of that stuff), you could use the display network and advertise on hobbyist sites.

    But before starting any PPC campaign, revamp the site. Even if your dad is ready and willing to waste some money, there's no need to do so.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9438992].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author dannytaki
      Originally Posted by LucidWebMarketing View Post

      As I thought, most of the products are not the sort of thing a consumer would need or even know about. Highly specialized stuff it seems.

      As suspected too, there is just a list of products. If I want to buy aircraft deicing fluid (virtually the only thing I see on the list that I know what it is), I want to know the brands you carry, the amounts I can buy and an idea of the price. There's nothing of that. It may not matter much for most of this stuff (probably delivered in tankers) but you still have to give the visitor information about each product. That's how you build a relationship and trust.
      Yeah, I will need to talk to him to figure out how he can give more detailed product information. But, I will also need to set up a online store. As I understand it, there are companies like Magento, which provide ecommerce solutions, but one can also set it up using free online tools like those provided at oscommerce.

      Originally Posted by LucidWebMarketing View Post


      Back to the display network, doesn't look like I would use it in this case. I would recommend starting with the search network. Actually, I recommend getting help (I'm available) and save you time, money and trouble.

      One other thing I recognize is solder and solder flux, having tinkered in electronics as a youth. Provided you sell in small amounts (I used to buy spools of that stuff), you could use the display network and advertise on hobbyist sites.

      But before starting any PPC campaign, revamp the site. Even if your dad is ready and willing to waste some money, there's no need to do so.
      I will work on it, thank you!
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9440842].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author jamesfreddyc
    Have you looked to see what your competitors are doing (if anything)? Maybe first put yourself in the shoes of one of your typical customers that'd search for your products to uncover the relevant ads in this space.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9439043].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Silentkiller1
    It can be done but you should check the related keywords and use the AdWords Keyword Tool to get more data. It is always good to test though.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9439788].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author drewfioravanti
    Those sites are OK. But not really needed. I assume he recommends them because he is an affiliate. Nothing beats experience.

    The reaon his book is better than the AdWords course is because he gives some marketing training whereas the AdWords course is just a course on their system.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9441484].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author dannytaki
      Originally Posted by drewfioravanti View Post

      Those sites are OK. But not really needed. I assume he recommends them because he is an affiliate. Nothing beats experience.

      The reaon his book is better than the AdWords course is because he gives some marketing training whereas the AdWords course is just a course on their system.
      Ha! That's funny, I bet he is an affiliate. So far its a good read though and not gimmicky. What 'tools' for Adword campaigns do you use?
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9441737].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author drewfioravanti
    I don't use any tools except for those that are within AdWords.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9441774].message }}
  • I used to be with WordTracker years and years ago. I don't find it necessary. For most stuff, keyword research is not rocket science. Sure WT could help but as Drew said, Adwords tools are adequate in a pinch.

    I don't recommend any sort of "spying" tool. First, there's no way they can know every single keyword used by someone else. It's basically a guess based on their own research (scraping). There's lots of other things it can't tell you like the keyword match types. Besides, how does it help you knowing what keywords a competitor uses? Would they not be the same or similar? Don't copy others, particularly ads. Build the best campaign that's best for you. Competitors may not have the best campaigns to start with.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[9444996].message }}

Trending Topics