Regulators are not far behind on AI

10 replies
So often new technology is widely used (and abused) before regulators catch on that there is a problem.

Not the case for AI in the USA at least....FTC's first comments about AI were in 2021 and pretty much ignored. The newer warnings are interesting....

https://www.ftc.gov/business-guidanc...i-claims-check

More commentary on the FTC warnings:

https://techcrunch.com/2023/02/27/ft...aims-in-check/
#regulators
Avatar of Unregistered
  • Profile picture of the author igrowyourbiz
    FTC doesn't care about, and can not regulate Ai. What they ARE concerned about and DO regulate is advertising claims.

    The issue is not Ai or any regulation of it. It is the claims of advertisements about products that say Ai is involved.
    Signature
    Get LEGIT! Make 6, 7 or 8 FIGURES Per MONTH
    Just Like The Other Students I Mentor Do!

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11747269].message }}
  • Interesting read. And I agree that governments across the free economy need to implement similar guidelines to protect B2B and B2C buyers ...

    What About Outside the U.S.?

    At our Sydney-based tech startup, here's the ethics framework that we need to follow: https://www.industry.gov.au/publicat...hics-framework
    Note: Our application for this needed to be approved before we were eligible to apply for government grants and univ lab resources, which we required to continue with R&D (scientific research + prototype engineering + internal testing across our core R&D team and partner universities) ...

    Meanwhile, because we're developing a medtech product, we also need to follow these ethics principles across our R&D, manufacturing and distribution pipelines: https://clinregs.niaid.nih.gov/country/australia
    Note: Our application for this also needed to be approved before we were eligible to apply for government grants to fund our lab setup, clinical trials with patients (we call them beneficiaries instead, and I'm also one of them as our tech is for persons living with blindness or visual impairments) and medtech product commercialization requirements ...
    Signature
    • Deep Learning & Machine Vision Engineer: ARIA Research (Sydney, AU)
    • Founder: Grayscale (Manila, PH) & SEO Campaign Manager: Kiteworks, Inc. (SF, US)
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11747349].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    The issue is not Ai or any regulation of it.

    I'm not convinced of that. On this forum we talk about AI as it pertains to content but it's so much more than that - and creating content may be the least of the worries with A.I.


    The ability to create what appears to be a real, well known person and have them say what you want it to LOOK LIKE they are saying is a frightening thought when you consider how it might be used.



    Going way back - when 'horseless carriages' were first available, they were a novelty. The horse-drawn carriage era lasted about 300 years but it took only 10 years or so for them to be replaced by automobiles.


    Henry Ford said "If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses." What Ford gave us was a totally new mode of transportation.

    And that new transportation put buggy and wheel makers out of business along with harness makers and livery stables, etc etc. Manufacturers that specialized in products for the care of horses, the maintenance of horses and their equipment - found themselves without customers.


    I've wondered how many professions will disappear as A.I. grows in uses and popularity. Will we need graphic artists? editors? proofreaders? voiceover artists? What 'tools of the trade' may become part of history?
    Signature
    Saving one dog will not change the world - but the world changes forever for that one dog
    ***
    One secret to happiness is to let every situation be
    what it is instead of what you think it should be.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11747437].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author igrowyourbiz
      Originally Posted by Kay King View Post

      I'm not convinced of that.
      lol you took the middle sentence out of context. so I can understand why you wouldn't be convinced

      I have been involved in multiple industries that have experienced this over the last 5 decades.

      Technology never puts experts out of business, it makes them more in demand. The ones who insist on "manually" doing things are the only ones left behind.

      Hand Painted Commercial Sign makers are still around...barely. The ones that learned tech, are thriving. The ones who never did and still can't make a sign by hand, but know the tech, are thriving.

      It is a tool, it doesn't think, or evolve. It does not replace anything except low-level work. There was a time when people waxed floors on their hands and knees, now people use a
      robot mop.

      Deep fakes have been around since photography has been around. It just moved to animation, CGI, and now "Ai" driven versions of them.

      The most powerful fake news is a blog. Nothing fancy is needed.


      But all of that has nothing to do with the post.


      My post (that you are not convinced of) addressed the original post...regulation (or lack thereof) and particularly that of the FTC.

      IN THAT CONTEXT, in regards to the FTC, they have no concern about Ai or it's use...just how it is advertised.
      Signature
      Get LEGIT! Make 6, 7 or 8 FIGURES Per MONTH
      Just Like The Other Students I Mentor Do!

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11747517].message }}
    • @Kay King,

      Originally Posted by Kay King View Post

      [SNIP]I've wondered how many professions will disappear as A.I. grows in uses and popularity. Will we need graphic artists? editors? proofreaders? voiceover artists? What 'tools of the trade' may become part of history?[/SNIP]
      Hmmm ... I think it's the job of government, educational institutions and social organizations, with the support of the private sector and the general public as a whole, to provide tech training, orientation and livelihood modernization workshops for workers who might be immediately displaced with increased adoption of AI tech across various industries ...

      For example, it's a good idea to educate more content authors on how to fine-tune and use open source or premium generative models for their particular use case, or even provide business training for building teams and working with engineers who can do this for them ...

      Graphics artists can for instance fine-tune generative image models like Stable Diffusion (now open source as of version 2.0). This way, they can transfer their unique styles (or combine other styles that appeal to them and their clients) unto the model, allowing them to "own" the fine-tuned model. They'd be able to create content in much faster and less costly ways, enabling them to handle more clients across wider niche markets ...

      Same thing with content writers, editors, proofreaders and generative NLP AI like OpenAI's GPT models ...

      As for voice artists and neural text-to-speech synthesizer models and generative music AI ...

      More so if they're trained in writing code. They can conceptualize unique runtime pipelines for their content production needs, potentially increasing the novelty value of their work product ...

      But again, education, training and relevant resources, in these tech fields as well as in livelihood and job modernization, are crucial components ...

      Additional Notes

      Once you model your unique style, you can charge other people who want to use your style in their content and models ...

      Sort of like patenting and licensing your style, i.e. If anybody wants to fuse Metallica's style into their music scores, sound effects and background music content, or add this style into their own generative models, then Metallica can charge them for using not just their generative models, but also for using their content as training data ...

      But this paints another crucial component -- The effective implementation of government laws and industry regulations for handling private training datasets and the licenses that come with the data as published by its authors.
      Signature
      • Deep Learning & Machine Vision Engineer: ARIA Research (Sydney, AU)
      • Founder: Grayscale (Manila, PH) & SEO Campaign Manager: Kiteworks, Inc. (SF, US)
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11747585].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    Technology never puts experts out of business, it makes them more in demand. The ones who insist on "manually" doing things are the only ones left behind
    .


    I agree to a point - I'm getting emails from some top marketers promoting "AI products" , "AI training"...i.e., jumping on this bandwagon. Very smart.


    AI may be the end of internet forums....though the AI 'posts' are (so far) very easy to identify and delete. I can see so many wonderful uses for AI - but if it becomes 'THE writer' for online websites/blogs/forums....better create some AI 'readers' to go with it.
    Signature
    Saving one dog will not change the world - but the world changes forever for that one dog
    ***
    One secret to happiness is to let every situation be
    what it is instead of what you think it should be.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11747601].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author igrowyourbiz
      Originally Posted by Kay King View Post

      .

      better create some AI 'readers' to go with it.
      Signature
      Get LEGIT! Make 6, 7 or 8 FIGURES Per MONTH
      Just Like The Other Students I Mentor Do!

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11747671].message }}
    • @Kay King,


      Originally Posted by Kay King View Post

      [SNIP]I'm getting emails from some top marketers promoting "AI products" , "AI training"...i.e., jumping on this bandwagon.[/SNIP]

      Well, what I'm seeing in my inbox, spam and promotion folders, along with a lot of posts here and in other places, is like watching engineers play basketball ...

      Certainly not something you'd want to watch. LOL!

      Just like watching many marketers here and elsewhere talk about what they think and believe AI, Machine Learning, Deep Learning and applied Computer Vision, Natural Language Processing, Natural Language Understanding and probabilistic statistics is, without first having sufficient real world academic knowledge and hands-on engineering experience -- Nothing different from a train wreck.
      Signature
      • Deep Learning & Machine Vision Engineer: ARIA Research (Sydney, AU)
      • Founder: Grayscale (Manila, PH) & SEO Campaign Manager: Kiteworks, Inc. (SF, US)
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11748235].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author writeaway
    The FTC is just being more proactive this time since the consumer market is almost predictably flooded by all sorts of dubious products whenever a HOT TREND appears

    Crypto? Tons of crypto MLM / MMO scams as well as flat out scamcoins

    Metaverse? Tons of metaverse 'focused' crypto and online services focused on the metaverse - not to mention MMO products

    Now it is AI's turn.....

    The more things change, the more they stay the same

    Regardless, the biggest impact of the rise of CHATGPT and CHAT-focused search platforms is the change in CONSUMER EXPECTATIONS regarding what a search result should look like

    If consumers now only prefer ONE answer (usually scraped and compiled from multiple sources), they won't click through the many 'citations' and sources offered.

    Practical effect: the end of traditional online publishing and its dependent systems like content-based affiliate marketing and of course SEO

    SEO won't die but it sure would have to go through a FRANZ KAFKA type metamorphosis
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11747900].message }}
    • Originally Posted by writeaway View Post

      SEO won't die but it sure would have to go through a FRANZ KAFKA type metamorphosis
      Las' time I tried that baby, I nearly fell offa a pony.

      Thing is, anywan tried to snake their way around helpful chatbots, automated ansas, or 1-7 optschwaahns gonna whooshy you through to the WRONG DEPARTMENT direck from yuffone knows this stuff don't interface with hoomans too great.

      So prolly trustin' your marketin' strategy an' key copy to AI prolly akin to danglin' your fleshiest protrusions ovah a pit in whomo's depths the gobblin' teeth of unknown (& real hungry) monstahs proliferate.

      Persnly, I am naht prepared to suffer said metamorphosis -- an' it ain't jus' bcs I gaht neat tits.

      We cain't see jus' yet how the dreams of AI gonna match up to the resolootion.

      (An' I speakin' here 'bout significant AI contribyootions masqueradin' as hooman copy, litrichure or *ffs* policy.)

      Meantime, I believe Pantone have already decided on their color for 2024.

      It is an uncannily grim hue they call ... Franz Kafka.
      Signature

      Lightin' fuses is for blowin' stuff togethah.

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11748233].message }}
Avatar of Unregistered

Trending Topics