How Are You Going Into 2021? Blind or with Vision?

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A lot of new people to internet marketing fly blind.

You see this in the questions. "What's working?" "What tool should I use?" "How do I do this?"

These are the wrong questions.

Oh, it's likely that someone will be nice enough to offer you a suggestion in answer. But even if you apply what they say, it probably won't work for you.

Q: "What's working?"
A: They probably spent a lot of time and effort focusing on making their recommendation work. But you think the thing is going to make you money right out of the box. Nope. You'll give up fast and never get there.

Q: "What tool should I use?"
A: Not relevant to your situation. A fit for theirs, perhaps. And they spent the time getting through the learning curve, which I'll call syntax. You won't. Your eyes will cross seeing the thing on the screen, and you'll leave.

Q: "How do I do this?" (eg. How do I use the forum?)
A: Its an experiential thing. You have to invest time and develop your 'ear'. Discernment. My market is not your market. Your market is not their market. Those other, more experienced business owners, have skills, interests and opportunities you do not: what works for them probably won't work for you.


So what should you be doing as a newbie, then? As we go into 2021, what perspective will best serve you?

1. Be in it for the long haul.

Expect that this is going to be a journey. You are going to have to develop several different skills and learn many things. There are no magic bullets or push button wonders. This is a job like any other, and you are going to have to learn how to do it.

2. Focus on an audience.

Your audience. Who are these people? Know them in detail. What do they want? What do they hate? What do they watch?

If you don't know, or what you offer is 'for everyone', you're sunk.

And most importantly: where are they? Where is your audience, where can you find them? You need to encounter them somewhere, and then work to bring them from there to your own turf.

If you don't understand what I mean... consider the possibility that your audience is on Facebook, in a large group. You have to get your target audience members out of there. Otherwise, you'll eventually (or sooner rather than later) get banned by the group owner. So your job is to make an initial connection in a non-sleazy way, and then interest them into connecting with you personally... and from there, get onto your email list so you can continue to market to them.

3. Have a picture of your business.

So many newbies go blank when they think about a picture of their business. If you can't imagine it, or can't draw it, it doesn't exist. You don't have anything.

A business, every business, has only three main pieces. Draw these out. Fill them in for your situation. Expect that it will take a little time to get clarity on these things (see point #1), but have doing so as a target.

Traffic

Conversion

Fulfillment.


Just those three things. If you spend the first few months of 2021 focused on figuring out and being able to clearly draw a picture of your business with those three things, I guarantee you'll be much better off than if you just try to float through and magically get somewhere.

Who's your audience? Where do they come from? That's Traffic.

How will you turn some of your audience into Buyers? That's Conversion.

Conversion can be a sales letter, a video sales letter (VSL), a sales conversation on Zoom or by phone, or any other thing that helps turn an audience member into a buyer.

How do you deliver the result you've promised? That's Fulfillment.

For some people, this is a downloadable .zip file.

For others, it's a membership site.

Some do it by personal or group coaching.

Others go away and design or copywrite or do some other task that has a deliverable at the end.


If you don't have clarity on these, and a resulting picture of your business, you're in deep trouble. You won't know how to focus, and on to what. Everything will seem of equal importance to you, and that is the kiss of death my friend.


If you're planning to be an affiliate marketer, consider the picture:

Traffic is your problem. That's what you're bringing to the table. Where's the audience?

Conversion is the sales letter of your Clickbank seller you've affliated with. Probably a good idea to warm the audience up with an email sequence prior to sending them to that sales page, but there's the main Conversion tool.

Fulfillment is their problem. That's the thing you affiliated with to offer. Up to you to vett that this seller provides what they say they'll provide.

Note that Conversion and Fulfillment are not enough. They are not a business. Yet we see people every day who have set up a Clickfunnels account and page, or got approved for an affliate offer, and think they have a business. No. They have next to nothing. The AUDIENCE (Traffic) is key and that's why I've stressed it here.


Keep these three things in mind, keep striving to learn more and get greater clarity on them, and you'll build a great business going into 2021.

It's not about "what's working"--because what works for you is something you'll figure out as you go, and it'll be a combination just for you.

It's not about "what tools should I use"--because what's relevant to them is probably not relevant to you. And there are no magic bullets.

It's not about "how do you do this"--because, again, you're going to have to figure out your own way. There's no such thing as a Business In A Box. The map is definitely NOT the territory. Get your mucking boots on and get into the marsh yourself. You can't go there by only looking at the map.


Get started on developing that picture. Questions?
#2021 #blind #vision
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  • Profile picture of the author Oscar K
    Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

    Questions?
    Yes: How would you market to the vision impaired?
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  • Profile picture of the author Oscar K
    I just noticed that my question looked like it was taking the Mick or being clever. It definitely looks like nothing else, and why would it?

    The 'Blind or with Vision' part of the title has nothing to do with my Q. I wasn't even thinking about it. And I really wasn't trying to be funny. It is actually quite a bizarre coincidence:

    You will see from some previous posts that I have an interest in attempting to teach guitar/make guitars for the vision impaired. What are the chances?

    I actually would appreciate any advice on how to market to the vision impaired - it is a current need. Any thoughts would be appreciated. Sorry for any misunderstanding.
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    • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
      Originally Posted by Oscar K View Post

      I just noticed that my question looked like it was taking the Mick or being clever. It definitely looks like nothing else, and why would it?

      The 'Blind or with Vision' part of the title has nothing to do with my Q. I wasn't even thinking about it. And I really wasn't trying to be funny. It is actually quite a bizarre coincidence:

      You will see from some previous posts that I have an interest in attempting to teach guitar/make guitars for the vision impaired. What are the chances?

      I actually would appreciate any advice on how to market to the vision impaired - it is a current need. Any thoughts would be appreciated. Sorry for any misunderstanding.
      If it was me doing the work, what I would do is find a company that is already successfully selling things to blind/visually impaired people. The product(s) must have an overlap with but not be in competition to what I am offering.

      What you need for quick results is access to BUYERS.

      People in your target market who have already stuck up their hand and said, "Yes! I will get out my wallet, my cash or my credit card, and buy something!"

      So who sells "guitar stuff"... "music stuff" to this market already?

      I'd find them, and negotiate a way to access their list. Probably an affiliate commission paid out to them per sale, which is easy to track, easy for them (they don't have to fulfill on anything, and they simply get paid), and saves you the trouble of having to knock over every rock looking for a prospective customer.

      I don't think people understand how valuable getting access to proven buyers is.

      I see a lot of people oohing and ahhing over list sizes, or group sizes or number of fans or whatever. Those are nothing. They are unqualified prospects. Most will never buy. You will never 'convince' them to buy, no matter how hard you work or how great your offer is. They are not buyers. They do not have the habit of getting out their wallet and buying.

      I also see a lot of people with scarcity mindset. They don't know their numbers, so of course "giving up" an affiliate payout looks scary. What they don't know is that they have a cost of customer acquisition anyway. Whether you tramp through the swamp, busting up a sweat, walking the territory on your own looking for a customer, or whether you access the fast lane to buyers through someone else's list, you're gonna pay for it some way. Frankly, you're paying that 30% or whatever somehow. Your blood, sweat and tears--or the easier way.

      So... from the five minutes of googling I did to address myself to your issue...

      "These shoppers account for over 10% of the population." Huh, did not know that. This may include colorblind people.

      "Ensure your website is accessible to the blind. Visually impaired individuals use screen readers to browse the internet and shop online. Refrain from designing webpages with top-heavy navigation, because this forces visually impaired people to sit through long descriptions of menus before reaching the actual content of the page. And always include appropriate ALT and TITLE tags for images, as screen readers use these to interpret image data."

      Make your call to action accessible -- easy to follow, explaining what information is required. Avoid radio buttons.

      Some articles mentioned braille and sign language presentation. Kinda on the nose, but I'll take it.

      Another article pointed out Facebook groups. Searching for "blind musicians" and "visually impaired musicians" on FB gave me some results.

      But I would not want to go through the awful effort of plinking away one at a time to get to my target market. I want to do a 'one to many' effort and use my energy effectively. So even if I could get into one of those FB groups, I'd still be working to develop a relationship with the group owner... and to make that offer to the group out in the open, directly, with that group owner's arm metaphorically around my shoulders, saying, "Here's a good guy with a great offer for us".

      I've been a copywriter for a quarter century and I'll finish with this: the things *I* thought were important as reasons for buying have always turned out to NOT be the same as what the target market believes is important. You are not your customer... go talk to them.
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      • Profile picture of the author Oscar K
        Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

        If it was me doing the work, what I would do is find a company that is already successfully selling things to blind/visually impaired people. The product(s) must have an overlap with but not be in competition to what I am offering.

        That never even occurred to me. This is invaluable advice.

        What you need for quick results is access to BUYERS.

        People in your target market who have already stuck up their hand and said, "Yes! I will get out my wallet, my cash or my credit card, and buy something!"

        So who sells "guitar stuff"... "music stuff" to this market already?

        Who knows?

        I'd find them, and negotiate a way to access their list. Probably an affiliate commission paid out to them per sale, which is easy to track, easy for them (they don't have to fulfill on anything, and they simply get paid), and saves you the trouble of having to knock over every rock looking for a prospective customer.

        That sounds like a solid approach.

        I don't think people understand how valuable getting access to proven buyers is.

        Yes, I don't normally have to worry about that. My customers usually search for and find the products I want them to buy.

        I see a lot of people oohing and ahhing over list sizes, or group sizes or number of fans or whatever. Those are nothing. They are unqualified prospects. Most will never buy. You will never 'convince' them to buy, no matter how hard you work or how great your offer is. They are not buyers. They do not have the habit of getting out their wallet and buying.

        What?

        I also see a lot of people with scarcity mindset. They don't know their numbers, so of course "giving up" an affiliate payout looks scary. What they don't know is that they have a cost of customer acquisition anyway. Whether you tramp through the swamp, busting up a sweat, walking the territory on your own looking for a customer, or whether you access the fast lane to buyers through someone else's list, you're gonna pay for it some way. Frankly, you're paying that 30% or whatever somehow. Your blood, sweat and tears--or the easier way.

        I like paying 13% for the ads.

        So... from the five minutes of googling I did to address myself to your issue...

        I can't tell you much I appreciate you making the effort.

        "These shoppers account for over 10% of the population. Hucking fell" Huh, did not know that. This may include colorblind people.
        .

        "Ensure your website is accessible to the blind. Visually impaired individuals use screen readers to browse the internet and shop online. Refrain from designing webpages with top-heavy navigation, because this forces visually impaired people to sit through long descriptions of menus before reaching the actual content of the page. And always include appropriate ALT and TITLE tags for images, as screen readers use these to interpret image data."

        Make your call to action accessible -- easy to follow, explaining what information is required. Avoid radio buttons.

        Some articles mentioned braille and sign language presentation. Kinda on the nose, but I'll take it.

        Ah yes, the technical aspects. Let's pretend they don't exist for now.

        Another article pointed out Facebook groups. Searching for "blind musicians" and "visually impaired musicians" on FB gave me some results.

        Good line of investigation. This will definitely be a good search for me to do.

        But I would not want to go through the awful effort of plinking away one at a time to get to my target market. I want to do a 'one to many' effort and use my energy effectively. So even if I could get into one of those FB groups, I'd still be working to develop a relationship with the group owner... and to make that offer to the group out in the open, directly, with that group owner's arm metaphorically around my shoulders, saying, "Here's a good guy with a great offer for us".

        Facebook groups are probably a good way to get into many things. Perfect for a start on this I would have thought. Just joining such a group is something I could do right now. Doing things usually works out better than not doing things in my experience so this being doing something I think it it'll get done.

        I've been a copywriter for a quarter century and I'll finish with this: the things *I* thought were important as reasons for buying have always turned out to NOT be the same as what the target market believes is important. You are not your customer... go talk to them.

        I can maybe find them a lot easier thanks to your efforts. Very much appreciated.
        So my first real object was to find a vision impaired person to teach to. For one thing I have no music qualifications and have been playing guitar for less than 6 months, so my credentials leave everything to be desired.

        BUT if I CAN do the job better than anyone, who will I be compared to? We'll have to see if I can.
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  • Profile picture of the author Profit Traveler
    It is like starting a giant sand castle city sculpture.

    I know what has to be done, it will be a meticulous endeavor to say the least but it is the vision that will keep me going.

    I like to do alot of my own graphics, I like to learn platforms inside and out before posting,

    I know I want a high ticket option in place,

    I know the people I want to partner with, I know the store I want to align with the brand I know the merchandise I want to sell,

    I know how I will highlight the people that have success with the training and how I will expand.

    I could write another 10 paragraphs but it all begins with starring at some sand and having fun in the implementation process.

    If I won the lottery would I still do it? Yep. I want it that much. But would bring in some big guns in every facet.

    I have a feeling some things will happen naturally to make it a long term success.
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    • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
      Originally Posted by Profit Traveler View Post

      It is like starting a giant sand castle city sculpture.

      I know what has to be done, it will be a meticulous endeavor to say the least but it is the vision that will keep me going.

      I like to do alot of my own graphics, I like to learn platforms inside and out before posting,

      I know I want a high ticket option in place,

      I know the people I want to partner with, I know the store I want to align with the brand I know the merchandise I want to sell,

      I know how I will highlight the people that have success with the training and how I will expand.

      I could write another 10 paragraphs but it all begins with starring at some sand and having fun in the implementation process.

      If I won the lottery would I still do it? Yep. I want it that much. But would bring in some big guns in every facet.

      I have a feeling some things will happen naturally to make it a long term success.
      You're one of the more experienced people here. You know about positioning and can help others. Thanks for posting. Here is my honest response.

      Perhaps you are keeping your cards close to your vest. I'm not seeing a whole ton of what I talked about. There is some about traffic and distribution: the stores you want to partner with. What I'm concerned about is you "getting ready to get ready".

      Why haven't you talked to them? I speak with hundreds of business owners every year and many are getting ready to get ready. They put that key outreach conversation off for one or more reasons... like "then I'd have to show up and put up", or "what if they say no".

      Things do not have to be a meticulous sand castle. You can fail forward to success. This partner or "big gun" doesn't work out? Find out fast and move on to another one.

      You want a high ticket option? Make it happen! Set the price. I've written about this for years.

      Nothing will "happen naturally". You will never be fully ready. No one ever is. You need to commit and make it happen.

      If you want to enjoy your daydream, that's fine. But it's not a business.

      You can be angry about my comments if you like. I'll ask you this: how long have you had this idea and kept it in the idea stage?
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  • Profile picture of the author Master Blaster
    I am going to make 2021 my b!tch.
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