Real Noob here but am struggling with conversion from landing page

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Hello All and I appreciate finding this forum.

I've followed a lot of conversion strategies on my site but - since starting a few months ago - no conversions or emails... nothing. I do get a decent number of impressions, clicks and page views (for a beginner) but no one seems to be hitting the go button.

I'm a bit at a loss because my offer is very, very good within the space I'm working.

I'm wondering if I can share a link to my landing page for critique - I don't want the MODS to flame or ban me so I'm just asking for some professional eyeballs to give me a nudge in the right direction. But maybe that would be seen (I guess rightly so) as self promotion.

Anyway, I want to keep it safe so I won't do that... but if anyone can make any suggestions to any specific threads within WF that will "show me the way" that would be great.
#conversion #landing #noob #page #real #struggling
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  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    Very smart not to add a link - it's not permitted in discussions posts. Suggest you use the 'search' function in the white toolbar above (use advanced search).


    Read the search engine optimization and ecommerce sections here for discussions about converting traffic to sales.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    Originally Posted by NimbleRage View Post

    Hello All and I appreciate finding this forum.

    I've followed a lot of conversion strategies on my site but - since starting a few months ago - no conversions or emails... nothing. I do get a decent number of impressions, clicks and page views (for a beginner) but no one seems to be hitting the go button.

    I'm a bit at a loss because my offer is very, very good within the space I'm working.

    I'm wondering if I can share a link to my landing page for critique - I don't want the MODS to flame or ban me so I'm just asking for some professional eyeballs to give me a nudge in the right direction. But maybe that would be seen (I guess rightly so) as self promotion.

    Anyway, I want to keep it safe so I won't do that... but if anyone can make any suggestions to any specific threads within WF that will "show me the way" that would be great.
    Those new to online marketing often try to mash Traffic and Conversion into a single step.

    Are you using a landing page designed to capture the lead?

    Or are you going straight for the sale?
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    • Profile picture of the author NimbleRage
      Hello Jason and thanks for your reply.

      I pressed the wrong reply button. at any rate, my reply is now the first one in this thread... still trying to find my way around how things work here.
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  • Profile picture of the author NimbleRage
    Hello Jason and thanks for your reply.

    My ads are pointing directly to the landing page which has a very SHORT explanation of the offer and then a CTA button that goes to a scheduling app. Analytics reports that all traffic is driven to this page (which is as it should be, right?)

    Is it better that my ad links point to a contact page first?

    Thanks again and looking forward to your reply.
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    • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
      Originally Posted by NimbleRage View Post

      Hello Jason and thanks for your reply.

      My ads are pointing directly to the landing page which has a very SHORT explanation of the offer and then a CTA button that goes to a scheduling app. Analytics reports that all traffic is driven to this page (which is as it should be, right?)

      Is it better that my ad links point to a contact page first?

      Thanks again and looking forward to your reply.
      Is this a click-to-call offer for a contractor service like a plumber or electrician?

      That could work if the prospect/visitor is having an emergency.

      Otherwise...think of it this way... you're paying to generate that lead.

      They have one shot to click "Yes" to schedule, and then that's it, you've lost the lead forever.

      You have to make a sale to get people to book a call--and another to get them to show up to that call!--so I'm not sure short copy is the right answer. Depends on what the offer is. I would be trying to capture that lead.
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  • Profile picture of the author bryan77
    I agree, if a real good offer or emergency type scenario, then you may get someone to schedule, otherwise I have found it is better to offer a lead magnet, just to get the lead, then follow up, my lead magnet list:


    Mini course (or course delivered via email)
    eBook
    Toolkit
    Video
    Giveaway - competition
    Infographic
    Checklist
    Newsletter
    Podcast episode
    Template
    Case study
    Swipe file
    Quiz
    Power Point
    Discount - discount voucher


    - maybe a discount voucher for your offer?
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    • Profile picture of the author NimbleRage
      Jason and Bryan,

      Thank you both for weighing in. Without disclosing anything that could get me banned, the service provided is one free initial therapy session. During this session (via video call) respondents can ask anything they would like as well as share whatever problems they would like to discuss during this initial session.

      Once they click the "schedule now" button on the landing page, they are taken to an online scheduling application so that they can book a convenient date and time that I would call them.

      Very straight-forward and in my space, nobody gives away a full session so it's a very significant offer. It's worth noting that - as you both can imagine - this type of service is also somewhat sensitive and it's difficult to get most people to put up their even for a free session.

      So, that's the workflow. Am I rushing it? Should I be directing people to my contact form from which they can get in touch with me via email first, answer whatever questions they have, and then try to get them to book into a free session?

      Truly appreciate your guidance!
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      • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
        Originally Posted by NimbleRage View Post

        Jason and Bryan,

        Thank you both for weighing in. Without disclosing anything that could get me banned, the service provided is one free initial therapy session. During this session (via video call) respondents can ask anything they would like as well as share whatever problems they would like to discuss during this initial session.

        Once they click the "schedule now" button on the landing page, they are taken to an online scheduling application so that they can book a convenient date and time that I would call them.

        Very straight-forward and in my space, nobody gives away a full session so it's a very significant offer. It's worth noting that - as you both can imagine - this type of service is also somewhat sensitive and it's difficult to get most people to put up their even for a free session.

        So, that's the workflow. Am I rushing it? Should I be directing people to my contact form from which they can get in touch with me via email first, answer whatever questions they have, and then try to get them to book into a free session?

        Truly appreciate your guidance!
        This is a situation for video. If you haven't already, you need to get on camera, demonstrate empathy, and show that you understand the problem and have a solution. Not necessarily a magic bullet solution, but some kind of relief. And this should be under 2-1/2 minutes.

        This will help the visitor identify with you, and feel that they know you a bit. That'll take things a long way towards booking the session.

        The call to action needs to be strong. Who knows how long the visitor has been living with this problem? They're likely comfortable with it--comfortable with being uncomfortable. You have to help them get over this hurdle in their mind before they'll consider booking a call.

        As an alternative, or prior to being given the chance to book a call with you, you could have them sign up for a quick free helpful thing. Could be a fast video series, or a 1-page pdf of problem-solution recommendations. This way you get the name & email address, so you can keep marketing to them. Follow-up is an autoresponder series with 2-3 helpful tip emails followed by a call to action to book the call email.
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  • Profile picture of the author SARubin
    Hard to say what's wrong based on your description here.

    Lots of things could be off

    You might be attracting the wrong prospects with your ad?
    The best promotion should attract your ideal customer and repel the wrong kind of people for your offer.

    Your ad to landing page message might be incongruent, causing peoples skepticism to take over?
    If your ad is offering "quick and easy" but your landing page says "make an appointment" then trust instantly takes a slap to the face, because making an appointment does not equal quick and easy.

    It might only be a subtle feeling in your visitor, but the gut reaction feels more like betrayal instead of trust

    The message on your landing page might feel over-hyped (aka. scammy) ?
    An "AMAZING ULTIMATE CURE FOR EVERY PROBLEM YOUR FACING" might sell to a few bright shiny object chasers, but it insults the intelligence of most prospects and will chase them away.

    Again, lots of things could be off. Or it might just be some minor tweak holding you back.

    Originally Posted by NimbleRage View Post

    I'm a bit at a loss because my offer is very, very good within the space I'm working.
    I don't know exactly what you're selling or who you're selling it to, but I will say one thing without hesitation...

    No, your offer is not very, very good. At least not for the people you're attracting, or you'd be getting a response by now

    It might be good to you, but you're not the customer.

    So let's dig down and do some deep customer research.

    I don't mean just building a customer avatar with a vague idea of who you're selling to. That type of vision doesn't get much more than the lackluster results that you're currently getting.

    I mean get intimate with your market and put yourself in the shoes of your ideal client for a while.

    I speak from experience. I've worked in the self development arena for many years, and while it's not the exact same thing as your therapy offer, many aspects translate smoothly from one to the other.

    Furthermore, I grew up with a mother who was a clinical psychotherapist. (Yes, as a puberty driven teenager growing up in the anxiety ridden streets of 1970s Detroit, coming home a therapist left it's own unique brand of psychological scars on my soul)

    But my point is, I know this theater from both sides of the stage.

    And I can say without hesitation - Your offer must feel more like an invitation from a professional, trusted, non-judgemental friend, and not a sales pitch

    You're asking people to share their intimate feelings with a stranger on the internet. This isn't facebook or instagram where they can put on a show and lie about how great their life is. This is sharing genuine fears, anxieties, or deep seated emotional scars that are often embarrassing.

    Like Jason said, some of them have probably become comfortable with being uncomfortable. Or they just figure that's the way life is going to be, so why bother trying to change.

    Others may feel like a freak, like there's something wrong with them that nobody else can truly understand. Anxiety is personal, and they're not going to bare their intimate emotional scars with someone they don't know and trust.



    The bottom line in your business - it all comes down to trust.

    People need to trust that you know what your doing, and just as important, they need to trust you won't judge them.

    Start with what Jason recommended. Make a few short videos and get yourself out there as a sympathetic, empathetic person. And post more on social media, in self help groups.

    Once people become familiar with you they'll begin to trust you more

    The good news is, once people trust you enough to talk to you they'll likely stay loyal to you for a long time, and that's the way you build a sustainable business.
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  • Your call to action is not compelling enough NimbleRage.

    As mentioned in previous posts above, you will want to employ some lead capture page, that offers a compelling lead magnet and automated email follow-up sequence.

    Without a follow-up sequence in place, it's very hard to generate sales consistently both online and offline. As Jason advised, get infront of the camera and create valuable video content, to compel your audience into taking massive action quickly. You'll have to build trust first before you can expect your prospects to become your buyers.
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  • Profile picture of the author Johnny12345
    Hi Nimble,

    The problem is your sales copy.

    Let me explain...

    In a nutshell, there are four (main) parts to a proper sales letter:

    1) The headline: It's job is to get the attention of your prospect.

    2) The benefits: This is what the service will do for your prospect. The big mistake beginners make is to focus on the service instead of what the service will do for them (in other words, the benefits).

    3) Proof elements: You need some for of proof that what you're selling really works. This could be testimonials (as long as they are FTC compliant), it could be about your level of expertise, or it could even be some sort of data that helps prove your case.

    4) The offer: This is about closing the deal. It needs to be irresistible. It typically includes the price (and why it's a bargain), a guarantee, a bonus, scarcity (or urgency) and a call to action.

    The thing is...

    As you can see, even if your offer is fine -- and I'll bet it isn't -- there are still many other ways you may have gone wrong.

    Copywriting and conversion are BIG topics. But, hopefully, you can see the big picture.

    And it doesn't end there...

    As many have said, there is also a matter of your sales strategy.

    The gold standard, if you will, is to collect your prospect's email address in exchange for a freebie of some sort. (Ideally, the freebie helps nudge them toward buying. However, if that doesn't work, you can still send more emails. In short, email gives you more "touches" for less cost.)

    Anyway... if you get all of the above stuff right, you'll stand a far better chance of success.

    Good Luck!

    John
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    • Profile picture of the author NimbleRage
      Thank you John (and all of those who have responded).

      All the information shared is very valuable and I will start taking action on each point as each of you have suggested.

      One question please: (1) The compelling headline, (2) the benefits, (3) the proof elements (4) the offer, and of course the video or freebie - should all of these elements be placed on the landing page of the ads I'm running, or should they be spread throughout my site (or both?)

      The ads I'm running (only reddit at the moment due to financial constraints) all click-through to my landing page (from which the user can also go through the few other pages of my website if they'd like... is that the correct workflow or should they click-through to my home page?

      Lastly, are the 4 points listed above (headline, benefits, proof, etc) considered a "sales funnel"?

      Kind regards to all and thank you for the time each one of you have taken to walk me through this process.
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      • Profile picture of the author savidge4
        Originally Posted by NimbleRage View Post

        The ads I'm running (only reddit at the moment due to financial constraints) all click-through to my landing page (from which the user can also go through the few other pages of my website if they'd like... is that the correct workflow or should they click-through to my home page?
        I am going to say this, you NEVER run an ad and send them to your home page.

        Basic funnel structure would be AD - Landing Page - Offer.

        Each one of these steps ( Ad, Lander, Offer ) is a conversion all of its own.

        You want to find/test Ads to find one that works, meaning the click thru rate of the ad is good. Once you have THAT, you then move to the lander.

        The Header of the Lander should match the Ad. if the Ad says "click here to lose 10lbs" and then you get to the lander and it is "Lose 30 lbs before your wedding" obviously does not match, and the conversion rate for the lander will be bad.

        "click here to lose 10lbs" and the lander is "Lose 10lbs, watch the video", and you are headed in the right direction.

        Depending on what exactly you are doing, you then have a CTA ( Call to Action ) on your lander that is either give me your e-mail, or buy now or whatever.

        Again the lander portion of the funnel is a conversion by itself. you can then adjust the lander to increase ( or decrease more often than not ) how well that page is getting people to click on the CTA.

        From the lander they ( the end user ) click/fill out the CTA and end up on the offer page. Again The Offer, has to match the Ad, that matches the lander. SAME SAME SAME. Lose 10 lbs, lose 10lbs Lose 30 before your wedding, again is not going to work.

        You obviously have to be familiar enough with what you are selling, and have gone through the buy process to understand what to offer on the front end of the funnel ( The Ad ) so that it matches the backend ( the Offer ) and ensure that your middle ( Lander ) matches as well.

        And THAT is the absolute basics.

        Hope that Helps!
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        • Profile picture of the author SARubin
          Originally Posted by savidge4 View Post

          The Header of the Lander should match the Ad. if the Ad says "click here to lose 10lbs" and then you get to the lander and it is "Lose 30 lbs before your wedding" obviously does not match, and the conversion rate for the lander will be bad.

          "click here to lose 10lbs" and the lander is "Lose 10lbs, watch the video", and you are headed in the right direction.
          Agreed Savidge, I can't even count how many times I've had to tell someone this exact same thing. Sometimes more than once to the same person.

          Simply put... Whatever the ad says, that gets people interested enough to consider the offer, sets a pre-frame of mind expectation in that person for what they're going to find when they click on the ad.

          And the landing page needs to stick to the same story that got them interested in the first place.

          Otherwise an incongruent message feels more like "bait and switch" to a lot of people. Even if they can't express it in words, they can feel it in their gut. Friction is created, credibility takes a hit, and conversion rates drop exponentially.


          Without sharing any personal info about a client,

          last year I was working with this guy who sells a self development program, with a life coaching back-end offer.

          Originally his ad said "Quick and Easy Way to End Procrastination and Become More Productive Starting Today"

          But then his landing page headline said "In as Little as 30 Days I can Help YOU Transform Procrastination into Productivity"

          Let's ignore the strength or weakness in the headline for just a second, and focus on the incongruency...

          The ad said "quick, easy, today" and the landing page headline said "30 days"

          To the client, 30 days seems quick and easy when we're talking about changing a lifetime of bad habits.
          But for potential customers it feels like the advertisement lied to them.



          The first thing we tried was changing the ad copy.
          Dropping the quick and easy to say "End Procrastination and Become More Productive Starting Today"

          Unfortunately, click rates for the ad went down. And sales numbers didn't go up. I guess that's why we only test one thing at a time, right. So we know what made the difference.

          We put the original ad back in place and changed the headline on the landing page to say "Give Me Just 5 Minutes And I'll Show You a Quick and Easy Way to End Procrastination and Become More Productive Starting Right Now"

          The offer gave them the first lesson right there on the page and explained how the program had dozens more scientifically proven ways to use the brains natural laziness to become more productive.

          Conversion rates went from almost zero, to just under 2%

          Not exactly a grand slam, but at least more money was finally coming in than what was going out.

          I worked with him for a few months, and with a few more changes we got his initial purchase rate up to just over 4% .

          Not my biggest winner ever, but at least he's now making a good profit from the money he spends on traffic.

          I guess the main CRO thing we can learn from this story is
          If our ad says "quick and easy" - our landing page needs to show them "quick and easy".
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      • Profile picture of the author Johnny12345
        Originally Posted by NimbleRage View Post

        One question please: (1) The compelling headline, (2) the benefits, (3) the proof elements (4) the offer, and of course the video or freebie - should all of these elements be placed on the landing page of the ads I'm running, or should they be spread throughout my site (or both?)

        The ads I'm running (only reddit at the moment due to financial constraints) all click-through to my landing page (from which the user can also go through the few other pages of my website if they'd like... is that the correct workflow or should they click-through to my home page?

        Lastly, are the 4 points listed above (headline, benefits, proof, etc) considered a "sales funnel"?

        Nimble,

        I'm not entirely sure what the page looks like that you're sending your prospects to. But... the two most common types of pages are squeeze pages (aka, opt-in pages) and sales letters.

        For a sales letter, all four of those elements (which are part of a framework called AIDA) will go on a single page. Do not "spread them out." I see that a lot. It's a mistake.

        You don't want to have to send people on an Easter egg hunt just so they can be exposed to your complete sales message.

        Now, with a squeeze page, you're just going for the opt-in -- not the sale. So, they are sometimes very simple. You don't necessarily need all four parts of AIDA, in that scenario.

        In fact, it's not uncommon for a squeeze page to be little more than a headline and an opt-in box.

        That said, I prefer squeeze pages that have a headline; a picture, graphic, or teaser video; bullet points; and (of course) an opt-in box.

        But keep in mind that sometimes squeeze pages are actually full sales letters. It depends what you're selling (and to whom).

        Finally, NO. The four parts of AIDA form a sales PAGE, not a sales FUNNEL.

        A sales funnel is a SALES PROCESS.

        So, you might have a low-cost front-end product. Then, when you buy it, you're taken to another page that tries to sell you a more expensive (but related) product. When you make it through that, if you didn't buy, they hit you with a downsell.

        That is an example of a sales funnel (aka, "upsell hell").

        I prefer simple funnels. Why? Because you can (and should) always upsell them on the backend (which is easy as long as you capture their email address).

        John
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