Is there an ideal length for a sales page?

22 replies
Hi
Is there an ideal length for a sales page? I have seen 4 page sales pages and 25 page sales pages.

At what stage do buyers just give up or better fast forward to the offer?


I look forward to hearing your views.
#ideal #length #page #sales
  • Profile picture of the author Chriswrighto
    This has been discussed many times here... the best way for you to find out is click here: https://www.google.com/search?btnG=1...opy&gws_rd=ssl

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  • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
    No. There isn't.

    Never focus on length.

    Sort out your benefits, strategy and positioning. Then write the copy. Then edit it down. Whatever you end up with is your answer.

    If you focus on length, you're just spinning your wheels.

    Makr
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    • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
      Depends if the prospect has been pre-sold on
      the product or not.

      The level of awareness and how close to the buying decision
      he's at, if he is already looking for a solution to a existing problem.

      The furether out from that, then you've got more work to do
      which requires a longer message.

      If, say you've got the swipe of an Facebook ad that brought in $16,567
      in 7 days for instand download, then you really don't need to say much more.

      Best,
      Doctor E. Vile
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  • Profile picture of the author Skystar
    It can be a lot shorter if you feature a slick little video.
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  • Profile picture of the author JonMills
    If I see another question like this I am going to bang my head against the wall.
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    • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
      Originally Posted by JonMills View Post

      If I see another question like this I am going to bang my head against the wall.
      I feel the same way about posters who spam the board with 10 posts in a short period of time.

      But sometimes you just gotta go with the flow and realize the world doesn't revolve around you.

      Alex
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      • Profile picture of the author The Copy Nazi
        Banned
        Originally Posted by Alex Cohen View Post

        I feel the same way about posters who spam the board with 10 posts in a short period of time.

        But sometimes you just gotta go with the flow and realize the world doesn't revolve around you.

        Alex
        Me too. Especially when said posters regurgitate posts from last year. And leave short, dumb comments like -
        What he said
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  • Exactly 6,743 words. Not one more or less.

    There you go... the secret success formula exposed.
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    • Profile picture of the author Cam Connor
      Originally Posted by MontelloMarketing View Post

      Exactly 6,743 words. Not one more or less.

      There you go... the secret success formula exposed.
      SHHHHHHH... I can't believe you finally unveiled the GREAT secret of Copywriting success.
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  • Profile picture of the author pintara3
    It's all in the structure and the content of the page not in how many pages.
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    • Profile picture of the author BudiT
      I believe the #1 factor is the product price. If it's a big ticket, then you need a really long sales page, or you need a long sales video. Also, when it's a big ticket, you probably need to do a whole lot of preselling, like 3 video presell -> launch, or webinar -> sell.

      ~ Budi T
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      • Profile picture of the author angiecolee
        Originally Posted by BudiT View Post

        I believe the #1 factor is the product price. If it's a big ticket, then you need a really long sales page, or you need a long sales video. Also, when it's a big ticket, you probably need to do a whole lot of preselling, like 3 video presell -> launch, or webinar -> sell.

        ~ Budi T
        Do you believe, or do you KNOW?

        Belief doesn't count for much around here. Proof does.

        And please try to avoid digging up random old threads.
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      • Profile picture of the author sethczerepak
        Originally Posted by BudiT View Post

        I believe the #1 factor is the product price. If it's a big ticket, then you need a really long sales page, or you need a long sales video. Also, when it's a big ticket, you probably need to do a whole lot of preselling, like 3 video presell -> launch, or webinar -> sell.

        ~ Budi T
        Wrong.

        The #1 factor is how much awareness the person already has about the product/service type, about your specific brand and about the offer being made. '

        If they're completely unaware that there's even a problem to solve, you've got to create awareness first. THEN you have to sell them on the general concept of the type of product/service you're selling. THEN you have to sell them on your brand and THEN you have to sell them on why they should act right now.

        That's a lot of words.

        If they're aware of the problem, but not aware that the type of product or service which you offer solves the problem OR if they have a conditioned prejudice against the type of product or service you're offering, you've got to sell (or REsell) them on the concept first.

        Still a lot of words, but not as much.

        If they're already sold on the general type of product or service you're selling, all you've got to sell them on is your brand AND the reason they should act right now.

        Less words, but still quite a few.

        If they've already been thinking about buying from you and are just on the fence, all you have to do is get them off the fence by making it 100% clear why they'll hate themselves if they don't act right now.

        That's even less words.

        Or, if they're ready to buy right now, credit card in hand, all you need is a few bullet points, a product picture and a buy now button.

        It can be something as expensive as a friggin' CAR, or as inexpensive as a $10 kindle book. Doesn't matter. Strategy is the guiding principle, not length.

        I've said this dozens of times on this forum, asking the question of length is a clear sign of inexperience. You're not writing a college paper. You're selling, and that's about strategy and structure, not word count.

        Sure, some strategies ultimately require less words, but the word count should be a product of a good strategy being followed, not the guiding principle and CERTAINLY not the end goal.

        UPDATE: Or, if you're still hung up on the topic of length, try cutting off your fingers and laying them end to end on your kitchen table. Then, measure. Your sales letter should be 1 1/2 inches shorter.
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      • Profile picture of the author Cam Connor
        Originally Posted by BudiT View Post

        I believe the #1 factor is the product price. If it's a big ticket, then you need a really long sales page, or you need a long sales video. Also, when it's a big ticket, you probably need to do a whole lot of preselling, like 3 video presell -> launch, or webinar -> sell.

        ~ Budi T
        WHY would you grave-dig this? We really didn't need another thread on "How long should a salesletter be" to begin with...
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  • Profile picture of the author mrmouse
    Keep This In Mind When You Think of "Long Copy"

    Long copy doesn't mean that you make it long for the song of having "long copy"

    It's not the "long copy" that sells. It's the entire sales process laid out in one written pitch that makes it long. And that's what sells.

    You need to set all of your pre-frames (to overcome potential objects) and go through the entire persuasion process. By the time you're done with that, your copy will likely be very long. I suppose you call that long copy. But then you need to trim it way down.

    What I see as a major difference between great copy and copy that sucks is a lack of omitting all the unnecessary fluff. Once you chisel away any parts that keep it from flowing, then you're left with copy as long as you need it to be. No more. No less.
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    • Profile picture of the author Loren Woirhaye
      It really depends on the complexity of the appeal, competition
      in reaching the target buyer, general competition, price,
      the distinctiveness of the product and whether people
      actually need it.

      Lots of the great sales offers were only 1 page.

      Some of the great offers were big mail packets with a 4
      or more page sales letter, a lift letter, a fold-out 4
      color thing... a whole bunch of stuff... I'm thinking
      of a Time-Life offer for a sort o encyclopedia of
      ancient history sold in the 1980s that was very
      successful.

      Anyway, a lot of internet sales letters are rather
      bloated due to the zero cost of delivery. There's
      no postage and printing to pay for. Perhaps the
      internet is ushering in a different type of sales
      letter... I've seen some very good ones with several
      trial closes spaced throughout and though the letter
      goes on and on, the appeal made prior to the first
      order button was pretty persuasive in relation to
      the superior reputation and awesome blog content
      of the seller.
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  • Profile picture of the author ghost209
    short answer: as long as it takes to sell them and not a word less or more.
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  • Profile picture of the author carlo_sim
    hmmmm... split test?
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  • Profile picture of the author Chris Kipson
    Ideally, it should be short enough that people wouldn't think it's an effort to read through the entire thing, but long enough to actually say everything you want to say. Don't limit yourself with a word court. Write everything that you need to include, and then read everything and sort the information into little chunks. You'll find that some can be expressed shorter, but more efficiently. You're not aiming to shorten your sales copy, just make it easier to understand, and more enticing.
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  • Profile picture of the author pstonik
    Copy can't be too long, only too boring. People will read about things they are passionate about or problems that are relevant to them all day long if you connect with them.
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