Copy done by HUGELY respected forum Copywriter... Review please...

by kevd10
36 replies
So I paid good money to have a sales letter written from a well-respected Copywriter in the WFH section.


I showed it to another Copywriting buddy and they basically said it is cr*p...


Could you guys review it?
#copy #copywriter #forum #hugely #respected #review
  • Profile picture of the author shawnlebrun
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    • Profile picture of the author kevd10
      Originally Posted by shawnlebrun View Post

      Well, what exactly is "good money"?

      In all honesty, it's pretty typical of the "good money" some of the forum members pay
      here... and that good money turns out to be $200.

      Shit, even my $500 offers, which are lower than low.... have been criticized
      for being way too low.

      But I offer them for a reason that works for me. I use something
      that low in order to train the copywriters I have on my staff at my agency.

      Otherwise, $500 is not even considered "good money" for copy.

      Most copywriters worth their weight will charge $3k, $5k, or more.

      This one we did recently, for $500... isn't earth shatteringly great
      or anything special...

      http://fitness-copy.com/trade.pdf

      But the client emailed me and said it's getting a 3% conversion
      rate to cold traffic.

      So, to him.... $500 was a steal... and yet, to some on the
      WF, $500 is expensive.

      So, I guess it's all relative.

      You can pay $5,000 for a letter and it's an absolute steal
      and bargain, because it could return 100 times that.

      Or, you could pay $100... which is close to what your
      copy looks like it's worth... and that $100 is too expensive
      because it doesn't return shit.

      Did you pay more than $500 for that?

      Again, I'm just curious to know if you paid more than
      $500. You don't have to answer, and def not reveal names...
      but I'm always curious as to what people consider "good money"
      when it comes to copy.


      OK, I guess my question should probably have left out the fee I paid or any discussion of payment at all.


      My question is, what do you think of the sales letter?
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  • Profile picture of the author Andrew Gould
    Most of the copy's stolen, pretty much word for word, from DigitalMarketer's Facebook offer: http://leadgenprospector.com/fb-promoted-post-ep/

    The copy even claims that you are DigitalMarketer.

    You should name and shame the "copywriter" behind this.
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  • Profile picture of the author JonMills
    Originally Posted by kevd10 View Post

    So I paid good money to have a sales letter written from a well-respected Copywriter in the WFH section.


    I showed it to another Copywriting buddy and they basically said it is cr*p...


    Could you guys review it?
    Yes its pretty crap.
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    • Profile picture of the author kevd10
      Originally Posted by JonMills View Post

      Yes its pretty crap.

      Cool thanks.
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  • Profile picture of the author shawnlebrun
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    BUT....

    With that said, test it out. Send some targeted traffic and see if you can establish a baseline.

    Because in all honesty, we could give you our opinions... but we're not the ones buying.

    I came on this forum back in 2002 or so, when I had a fitness biz.

    I posted a letter... asking for a critique.

    Almost everyone on the forum at the time beat it down like it owed them money.

    But the thing I failed to mention... is the letter was doing $10,000 a day on Clickbank.

    I just wanted to ask for ways to improve it... and got a lot of "it sucks, you suck!"

    So, you never know until you test it... Mmmmkay?
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    • Profile picture of the author kevd10
      Originally Posted by shawnlebrun View Post

      BUT....

      With that said, test it out. Send some targeted traffic and see if you can establish a baseline.

      Because in all honesty, we could give you our opinions... but we're not the ones buying.

      I came on this forum back in 2002 or so, when I had a fitness biz.

      I posted a letter... asking for a critique.

      Almost everyone on the forum at the time beat it down like it owed them money.

      But the thing I failed to mention... is the letter was doing $10,000 a day on Clickbank.

      I just wanted to ask for ways to improve it... and got a lot of "it sucks, you suck!"

      So, you never know until you test it... Mmmmkay?


      OK,


      I want you to really, really think about this...


      If the above is true, how can ANYONE justify charging $500+ for a sales letter?


      You have just said yourself than nobody knows how a letter will do. So what makes 'Copywriters' opinions on what will do better worth $500+?
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      • Profile picture of the author shawnlebrun
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        Originally Posted by kevd10 View Post

        OK,


        I want you to really, really think about this...


        If the above is true, how can ANYONE justify charging $500+ for a sales letter?


        You have just said yourself than nobody knows how a letter will do. So what makes 'Copywriters' opinions on what will do better worth $500+?
        Sh*t, I can justify charging $5,000 for a sales letter.

        Why?

        Track record and proof of results.

        That's how you can tell with any writer that you can get copy that produces a good ROI.

        That's all it's about... Return on Investment.

        If I charge $5,000 for a letter and it makes my client $50,000 or $500,000, that's a good ROI.

        If you paid $100 for that copy you posted, for example, and got zero sales... that's a shitty ROI.

        the $5,000 copy was a better deal than the $100 copy.

        It's all about the return man.

        And to answer your question... what makes one writer's opinion or work
        more valuable?

        Again, track record and proof.

        If they've written winners in many other niches, including the one you're looking to enter... there's a much better chance that writer will produce another winner.

        So, when I personally hire someone for my companies, I ask them what have they written that has produced X results.

        Past results can often dictate future results.

        Not always, but it's a good bet that someone who has produced winners in the past will continue producing winners.

        So, you're paying more for that... the fact you're much more likely to get a better response.

        It's the same thing with anything, really. You're paying for the value.

        Baseball just started... and I'm a huge baseball fan.

        What makes Mike Trout worth $20 million and a rookie worth $100,000.

        Simple, Trout has produced in the past 3 years... so there's a good chance he will produce in the future. The rookie is unproven.

        Same with copy... you're paying more for the chance for a better return on investment.

        Tis all it's about.
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        • Profile picture of the author kevd10
          Originally Posted by shawnlebrun View Post

          Sh*t, I can justify charging $5,000 for a sales letter.

          Why?

          Track record and proof of results.

          That's how you can tell with any writer that you can get copy that produces a good ROI.

          That's all it's about... Return on Investment.

          If I charge $5,000 for a letter and it makes my client $50,000 or $500,000, that's a good ROI.

          If you paid $100 for that copy you posted, for example, and got zero sales... that's a shitty ROI.

          the $5,000 copy was a better deal than the $100 copy.

          It's all about the return man.

          And to answer your question... what makes one writer's opinion or work
          more valuable?

          Again, track record and proof.

          If they've written winners in many other niches, including the one you're looking to enter... there's a much better chance that writer will produce another winner.

          So, when I personally hire someone for my companies, I ask them what have they written that has produced X results.

          Past results can often dictate future results.

          Not always, but it's a good bet that someone who has produced winners in the past will continue producing winners.

          So, you're paying more for that... the fact you're much more likely to get a better response.

          It's the same thing with anything, really. You're paying for the value.

          Baseball just started... and I'm a huge baseball fan.

          What makes Mike Trout worth $20 million and a rookie worth $100,000.

          Simple, Trout has produced in the past 3 years... so there's a good chance he will produce in the future. The rookie is unproven.

          Same with copy... you're paying more for the chance for a better return on investment.

          Tis all it's about.
          Yea I get all that, I do...


          But you just said yourself that the only way to know if something is likely to work is to test it.


          But by saying that, you are invalidating any benefit a Copywriter could offer, as their opinion would be as good as the next guys because testing is the only way to go.
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          • Profile picture of the author angiecolee
            Originally Posted by kevd10 View Post

            Yea I get all that, I do...


            But you just said yourself that the only way to know if something is likely to work is to test it.


            But by saying that, you are invalidating any benefit a Copywriter could offer, as their opinion would be as good as the next guys because testing is the only way to go.
            Flawed logic here.

            Why pay millions and billions in advertising at all?

            Because you need customers. Best product in the world isn't going to sell if people don't know it exists.

            And really think about what Shawn said.

            If you need to get your product in front of customers, how do you do it?

            Do you go door to door?

            Do you run an ad and take a chance on someone unproven?

            If you do run an ad, in most instances, you'll go with someone experienced.

            No, they can't guarantee it will work. But through years of experience and witnessing previous tests that show what has and hasn't worked, they're pretty good at predicting what will work based on a LOT of data on what does NOT work. This why the term "best practices" exists.

            You can argue semantics and opinions all you want. Until you GET IT, you're going to be taken for rides by less experienced or shady marketers and constantly justifying it with "well, no one REALLY knows".

            Some know better than others.
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            • Profile picture of the author max5ty
              [QUOTE=angiecolee;9992964

              No, they can't guarantee it will work. But through years of experience and witnessing previous tests that show what has and hasn't worked, they're pretty good at predicting what will work based on a LOT of data on what does NOT work. This why the term "best practices" exists.


              [/QUOTE]

              Couple things I'd take issue with:

              1. You say after years of testing. Things change on a daily basis. What worked wonders then won't get a second look now.

              2. All the data on what does and doesn't work is usually useless unless it's very short term data.

              Ad agencies usually fail 90% of the time, even after all their boasting of past awards.

              A campaign doesn't have to be earth shaking to get results. It only has to tip the scale towards the buyer slightly.

              As I said in my previous post, I don't know who wrote this, nor do I care. I don't understand how or why someone would ask for a critique without testing it.

              When you ask for a critique you'll get 100 different opinions all from someone who didn't do the research into the project.

              If the copywriter is willing to work with the client after testing, it's a plus and can lead to a home run.

              It's too early to tell if this letter sucks or not.
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              • Profile picture of the author angiecolee
                Originally Posted by max5ty View Post

                Couple things I'd take issue with:

                1. You say after years of testing. Things change on a daily basis. What worked wonders then won't get a second look now.

                2. All the data on what does and doesn't work is usually useless unless it's very short term data.

                Ad agencies usually fail 90% of the time, even after all their boasting of past awards.

                A campaign doesn't have to be earth shaking to get results. It only has to tip the scale towards the buyer slightly.

                As I said in my previous post, I don't know who wrote this, nor do I care. I don't understand how or why someone would ask for a critique without testing it.

                When you ask for a critique you'll get 100 different opinions all from someone who didn't do the research into the project.

                If the copywriter is willing to work with the client after testing, it's a plus and can lead to a home run.

                It's too early to tell if this letter sucks or not.
                1) I never said whether or not it sucks.

                2) This was in response to asking why a copywriter could possibly justify their cost if nothing can be proven until it's tested.

                3) I think you're saying the same thing as me in different words.
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          • Profile picture of the author MikeHumphreys
            Originally Posted by kevd10 View Post

            Yea I get all that, I do...


            But you just said yourself that the only way to know if something is likely to work is to test it.


            But by saying that, you are invalidating any benefit a Copywriter could offer, as their opinion would be as good as the next guys because testing is the only way to go.
            The only logical way to know if something is likely to work is to test it. Of course if the salesletter is a terrible bomb, then testing alone isn't going to improve its performance. So I recommend starting with a very good or great salesletter and split-test/mulit-variate test to lift its conversion rates even more.

            Re: Benefit of working with a copywriter.

            The benefit you gain from working with a copywriter is their depth of experience and their track record of delivering more sales for their clients. The deeper their level of experience... the bigger their track record... the better the chances are that they can position your product to succeed.

            Of course, the more experienced the copywriter, the higher fee they command for their expertise especially if they have the track record that matches their depth of experience.

            As for public forum critiques, it depends on who's offering them up. If it's a copywriter who's written for that type of product or niche, then there could be a lot of value in their advice.

            Keep in mind, that a public forum critique is limited free advice. There's a finite amount of time that any copywriter can donate to do a free critique. Free critiques do not pay their mortgage but doing paid client work does. IMHO, the vast majority of experienced copywriters are using their mental bandwidth on paid client work instead of doing free critiques all day/night long.

            Case in point, if I do a public forum critique, I'm donating 10-15 minutes of my time to try to help someone out... maybe get them pointed in the right direction. If I do a paid critique, then I'm spending several hours on the critique pointing out everything that needs to be improved or changed.

            Hope that helps,

            Mike
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      • Profile picture of the author splitTest
        Originally Posted by kevd10 View Post

        OK,


        I want you to really, really think about this...


        If the above is true, how can ANYONE justify charging $500+ for a sales letter?


        You have just said yourself than nobody knows how a letter will do. So what makes 'Copywriters' opinions on what will do better worth $500+?
        If you're gonna get into marketing, learn a bit about copywriting yourself. This will help you pick better copywriters, judge their work better, edit copy, know which writers are worth what, and even know which critiques to take to heart and which are b.s..

        Copywriting is really not magic or rocket science. Even if you don't enjoy doing it yourself, you can learn to judge it pretty well pretty easily.

        Regarding the copy you posted for critique: The headline as it stands is kinda blah and generic. "$1.64" ain't that impressive (good point, Ray) and I think you'll lose a lot of people with the math lesson in the paragraphs right at the opener...

        And btw, it still borrows lines from http://leadgenprospector.com/fb-promoted-post-ep/. Not that that's so horrible -- it's not egregious copying... (Wonder if the same writer did both pieces?) Just observing...

        This copy isn't amateurishly horrible, but imho a better copywriter could take that and turn it into something that will convert better -- starting with the headline...

        I wouldn't call it "crap" -- it's just bland and shallow... Not a lot of urgency or specificity... Takes a long time to get going... And there doesn't seem to be a lot that differentiates it from so many other offers you see out there... No real "hook"...

        Maybe the "well-respected Copywriter" you hired just didn't have a lot of time to devote to this for the $$ you were paying... Thus the borrowing from the other piece...

        The copy kinda sounds like a copywriter from here whose work I've checked out. Nobody does those short conversational sentences like this guy. And in fact, the dude I'm thinking about (no names) does write great copy (in my ever-so-humble opinion)... Maybe he gave you a break on his regular fee?

        Not to pry but... Am I guessing correctly that (~whoever it is -- no names~) they gave you a break on the regular fee... ?
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  • Profile picture of the author Raydal
    I did a quick critique of the sales letter here:


    -Ray Edwards
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  • Profile picture of the author kevd10
    Ray, thanks a lot buddy...


    Very informative video.
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  • Profile picture of the author max5ty
    Don't know who wrote it or how much you paid.

    Didn't think it was the worst I've ever seen. Would have done things differently, but wouldn't we all. No two copywriters write the same.

    Is this letter attempting to beat a control you already have?

    If it is you'll soon find out if it beats. If it's not, you'll have a control for others to go up against.

    I learned a long time ago that unless the letter is horribly bad, I don't try and critique the ability of the copywriter without first testing it.

    Is the copywriter willing to work with you after testing?

    Have you considered turning this into a video?

    Wouldn't rate it the highest, and wouldn't rate it the lowest. Test it against your control (if you have one) and let us know the results.
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  • Profile picture of the author shawnlebrun
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    One powerful demonstration is better than 1,000 words of copy trying to explain.

    And one valid test is better than 100 opinions.
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  • Profile picture of the author kevd10
    I don't know... I'm not convinced.


    It seems the price a Copywriter charges is based on the size of the client & the price of the product.


    I mean who would pay $5,000+ for a sales letter for a $27 product. Doesn't make sense. As so many have said, things change on a daily basis as to what is converting and what is not. So by the time you approach break even after the 5k fee for your sales letter, who's to say the sales letter is still converting the way it was when the product was first launched.


    It seems there is pretty much one professional standard for sales letters. Whether they are for a $7 product or a $70,000 product. There is only so much you can do to make a sales letter good. How could a well known Copywriter charge $5k for a letter for a $7 product knowing that the letter would never make the money to break even?
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    • Profile picture of the author angiecolee
      Originally Posted by kevd10 View Post

      I don't know... I'm not convinced.


      It seems the price a Copywriter charges is based on the size of the client & the price of the product.


      I mean who would pay $5,000+ for a sales letter for a $27 product. Doesn't make sense. As so many have said, things change on a daily basis as to what is converting and what is not. So by the time you approach break even after the 5k fee for your sales letter, who's to say the sales letter is still converting the way it was when the product was first launched.


      It seems there is pretty much one professional standard for sales letters. Whether they are for a $7 product or a $70,000 product. There is only so much you can do to make a sales letter good. How could a well known Copywriter charge $5k for a letter for a $7 product knowing that the letter would never make the money to break even?
      I can't speak for others. I charge based on what will make me thrilled to work on the project and want to give it my all.

      For this very reason, I turn down lucrative projects all the time. You cannot PAY me to be interested in finance. However, I know plenty of people who specialize in it that I can refer.

      Of course I care about profit - but first and foremost I do work I LIKE.
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    • Profile picture of the author splitTest
      Originally Posted by kevd10 View Post

      It seems there is pretty much one professional standard for sales letters. Whether they are for a $7 product or a $70,000 product. There is only so much you can do to make a sales letter good. How could a well known Copywriter charge $5k for a letter for a $7 product knowing that the letter would never make the money to break even?
      I definitely see your point, Kev. But bear in mind that a lot of work can go into writing...

      Research into the product, competition, audience... Research into copywriting approaches that might work for that product, competition, audience...

      The more you pay, the more incentive the copywriter will have to leave no stone unturned in search of the right approach... and make sure every word works. He won't need to write a letter a day to make a living, and he'll have more time to do a bang up job with yours...

      Claude Hopkin's "Scientific Advertising" comes to mind -- the part where he talks about the research involved in finding the perfect hook, sometimes based on some obscure fact about the product, or some technical process involved in its production...

      Combine the legwork involved and the copywriter's native talent, ingenuity and track record, and you can see why one copywriter might be worth $5000 while the other just $500.

      ... But most valuable of all is knowing a bit about copy yourself, because copywriters are salesmen and ultimately they'll sell you on whatever fee they think they can. Knowing how to judge copy well is a valuable talent for marketers, whether they plan to write copy themselves or not.

      Long time ago, when I worked 9 to 5, some guy convinced my boss to pay $7000 to write copy promoting a conference. The copy he submitted was a single half-page paragraph that read like some fanciful eight-grader had written it. It was absolutely horrible.

      She asked me to rewrite it. I've saved that dude's draft to this day (knowing he had gotten $7k for it) as career inspiration.

      Copywriters are in sales. Many will sell you on a high fee if they can -- whether they're worth that much or not. And talented beginners will try to undercut those guys. That's why all in all, knowing good copy when you see it (based on your own study) is valuable in marketing...
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      • Profile picture of the author kevd10
        Originally Posted by splitTest View Post

        I definitely see your point, Kev. But bear in mind that a lot of work can go into writing...

        Research into the product, competition, audience... Research into copywriting approaches that might work for that product, competition, audience...

        The more you pay, the more incentive the copywriter will have to leave no stone unturned in search of the right approach... and make sure every word works. He won't need to write a letter a day to make a living, and he'll have more time to do a bang up job with yours...

        Claude Hopkin's "Scientific Advertising" comes to mind -- the part where he talks about the research involved in finding the perfect hook, sometimes based on some obscure fact about the product, or some technical process involved in its production...

        Combine the legwork involved and the copywriter's native talent, ingenuity and track record, and you can see why one copywriter might be worth $5000 while the other just $500.

        ... But most valuable of all is knowing a bit about copy yourself, because copywriters are salesmen and ultimately they'll sell you on whatever fee they think they can. Knowing how to judge copy well is a valuable talent for marketers, whether they plan to write copy themselves or not.

        Long time ago, when I worked 9 to 5, some guy convinced my boss to pay $7000 to write copy promoting a conference. The copy he submitted was a single half-page paragraph that read like some fanciful eight-grader had written it. It was absolutely horrible.

        She asked me to rewrite it. I've saved that dude's draft to this day (knowing he had gotten $7k for it) as career inspiration.

        Copywriters are in sales. Many will sell you on a high fee if they can -- whether they're worth that much or not. And talented beginners will try to undercut those guys. That's why all in all, knowing good copy when you see it (based on your own study) is valuable in marketing...
        Pretty great input man, thanks. Maybe I should dive in and learn abit myself about copywriting.
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    • Profile picture of the author MikeHumphreys
      Originally Posted by kevd10 View Post

      I don't know... I'm not convinced.


      It seems the price a Copywriter charges is based on the size of the client & the price of the product.
      Any ethical copywriter wouldn't.

      My quoted fee is my fee regardless of the size of the client or the price of their product. Many times, if it's something like a $7 product, I turn down the project. They're not ready to bring in someone like me. Not unless they have a funnel in place and the ability to drive a lot of traffic consistently.

      [quote]
      I mean who would pay $5,000+ for a sales letter for a $27 product.
      [QUOTE]

      For starters, a lot of experienced marketers and business owners. At least the ones who have the ability to drive traffic consistently to a salesletter. They get their targeted traffic from either their own house list (often 10K or more people), affiliates, JV partners, or some combination of the above.


      Doesn't make sense. As so many have said, things change on a daily basis as to what is converting and what is not. So by the time you approach break even after the 5k fee for your sales letter, who's to say the sales letter is still converting the way it was when the product was first launched.
      No offense, but you're thinking too small in terms of the purpose of that salesletter.

      The better questions to ask are things like...

      ... What's the backend to that product?
      ... Are there upsells or downsells?
      ... Are you trying to build a customer list that you can market follow-up products to (yours or other people's) in the future?

      That $5K salesletter could deliver far more than that in additional and future sales than the single product it's selling.

      It seems there is pretty much one professional standard for sales letters. Whether they are for a $7 product or a $70,000 product. There is only so much you can do to make a sales letter good. How could a well known Copywriter charge $5k for a letter for a $7 product knowing that the letter would never make the money to break even?
      Simple. A $7 product is the front-end offer. It builds a large list of buyers which you then turn around and offer similiar products and services forever to. So that $5K upfront investment could launch a $100K per year business IF you have the marketing skills and expertise to power the rest of the marketing funnel.

      But like I said earlier, most of the people who contact me about a salesletter for a $7 product, I won't take on their project. They're not ready to work with someone with my track record or experience.
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  • Profile picture of the author chillheart
    kevd10, looks like we have a consensus:

    1. The copy isn't good, but it may or may not be a bag of crap.
    2. Test it anyway.
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  • Profile picture of the author Raydal
    Whenever I take on new clients I always ask if they have worked with a
    copywriter before. If the answer is "no" then I know I have some education
    to do.

    One of my lost loyal and longest standing clients would tell you that my
    copy made him millions of dollars, BUT he is also a great marketer
    and knows how to drive TRAFFIC. So these type of clients don't
    bark at a copywriters fees because they know they are going to make
    it back and there is no limit to how long they can use the same letter.

    My very first online sales letter pulled in over $100,000 for a $37
    ebook. And I also sold a course based on the principles used in
    that sales letter which bought in more money as well.
    "The surest way to overspend in advertising is not to spend enough to do a job properly. It's like buying a ticket three-quarters of the way to Europe; you have spent some money, but you do not arrive"
    -Charlie Motimer as quoted by David Ogilvy in
    Confessions of an Advertising Man p.116



    "There is hardly anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse and sell a little cheaper, and the people who consider price only are this man's lawful prey"
    -John Ruskin (emphasis mines)

    -Ray Edwards
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    • Originally Posted by Raydal View Post


      My very first online sales letter pulled in over $100,000 for a $37
      ebook. And I also sold a course based on the principles used in
      that sales letter which bought in more money as well.



      Pretty cool. How long did it take to get to that amount?


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      • Profile picture of the author Raydal
        Originally Posted by The Copywriting Engineer View Post

        Pretty cool. How long did it take to get to that amount?
        [/INDENT]
        Good question. That's the revenue from the lifetime of that one product which
        was about 4 years before things trickled off. Most of that came from free
        traffic (the good old days) and less than $500 spent in PPC traffic.

        There was also "resell rights" income.

        -Ray Edwards
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        The most powerful and concentrated copywriting training online today bar none! Autoresponder Writing Email SECRETS
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        • Originally Posted by Raydal View Post

          Good question. That's the revenue from the lifetime of that one product which
          was about 4 years before things trickled off. Most of that came from free
          traffic (the good old days) and less than $500 spent in PPC traffic.

          There was also "resell rights" income.

          -Ray Edwards
          That must have been a happy client. That must have been quite a few years ago, so that amount a month was a lot back then...


          Did you get to keep the money from the course you made based on the book? I also wonder how much that brought in.
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          • Profile picture of the author Raydal
            Originally Posted by The Copywriting Engineer View Post

            That must have been a happy client. That must have been quite a few years ago, so that amount a month was a lot back then...
            Did you get to keep the money from the course you made based on the book? I also wonder how much that brought in.
            That was MY first sales letter, not a letter for a client. I wrote for myself
            before I took on clients.

            -Ray Edwards
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            The most powerful and concentrated copywriting training online today bar none! Autoresponder Writing Email SECRETS
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  • Profile picture of the author no1d
    I'm curious, when a copywriter says his sales letter pulled in over $100,000, this is profit or he mean revenue?

    In my point of view it is very importat to know the selling process, email marketing, ppc, affiliates, etc
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  • Profile picture of the author dmaster555
    Be sure to take a "hugely respected " warriorforum member with a grain of salt. Lots of people here are wannabes. Make claims they've never backed up and paraphrase what they've heard the pros say to sound competent in a given field.

    There are some talented people here for sure , but do your research.
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  • Profile picture of the author SeoKungFu
    Crap is an understatement for this piece of greasy shit
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  • Profile picture of the author ChrisNosal
    Banned
    Originally Posted by kevd10 View Post

    So I paid good money to have a sales letter written from a well-respected Copywriter in the WFH section.


    I showed it to another Copywriting buddy and they basically said it is cr*p...


    Could you guys review it?
    How does this look any different from any other website out there?

    If you can't write copy ABOVE the level of everyone else's, then you're just average.

    The problem is he's just bragging about why all the other guys suck, he's great, and making claims identical to the other 50+ sites your customer will visit.

    The customer leaves this page thinking, "I've visited many products, I don't understand how this one is any different, there's no evidence this guy is an expert, or knows what he's doing, and it looks like he's just trying to sell his product."

    Today, your customer is searching a number of products - they're not just looking for a solution to a problem.

    Today we have options, and your job as a marketer is to communicate:
    1. You're the greatest expert in your niche
    2. Your product is specifically for them (Say "six-pack abs" instead of "weight loss")
    3. Your product is the most powerful choice out there

    It's all bragging, fluff, and hype with no substance, or showing any interest in helping someone until they make their money.
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