For The Copywriter Who Doesn't Settle For Being Average

24 replies
One of the tested and proven patterns in advertising
is calling out who the message is for.

One of the most respected creator of print ads that
asked for money was Mel Martin, would do it.

Here's a file of his ads so you can see
how the reader knew it was speaking to her or him.

http://www.what-is-coaching.com/supp..._file_048b.pdf

Enjoy!
Doctor E. Vile
#average #copywriter #settle
  • Profile picture of the author chillheart
    So that was his name... Mel Martin.

    I thought for SURE there was a copywriter known for ads that are mostly bullets.

    This was haunting me for MONTHS.
    Signature
    Chillin' hard...
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  • Profile picture of the author Mikesweeney
    Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

    One of the tested and proven patterns in advertising
    is calling out who the message is for.

    One of the most respected creator of print ads that
    asked for money was Mel Martin, would do it.

    Here's a file of his ads so you can see
    how the reader knew it was speaking to her or him.

    http://www.what-is-coaching.com/supp..._file_048b.pdf

    Enjoy!
    Doctor E. Vile
    Thank you Ewen. I learned some good stuff from this swipe.
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    • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
      Originally Posted by Mikesweeney View Post

      Thank you Ewen. I learned some good stuff from this swipe.
      Pleased you enjoyed it Mike.

      His way of calling out to the right audience
      is even more applicable today.

      Now that the public have been cheated by promises, benefits and claims,
      starting off with them is the kiss of death.

      The antidote is telegraphing who the message is for in detail,
      so you get attention.

      You can't buy your way into trust,
      you have to earn it.

      Best,
      Doctor E. Vile
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  • Profile picture of the author Xav
    Oh wow, I've been searching for a Mel Martin Swipe! Thank you very much.
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  • Profile picture of the author AmericanMuscleTA
    Great swipe file!

    First time I've heard of Mel Martin... Learn something new every day.

    I love how he calls out his prospects... Directly by name!
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    David Hunter | Duke of Marketing
    www.DukeOfMarketing.com
    www.BibleAndFriendsYouTube.com

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    • Profile picture of the author DABK
      Thanks, Ewan

      I've been a great proponent of calling out like that... Good to know I didn't invent the wheel. The burden would have killed me!
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  • Profile picture of the author ChrisNosal
    Banned
    Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

    One of the tested and proven patterns in advertising
    is calling out who the message is for.

    One of the most respected creator of print ads that
    asked for money was Mel Martin, would do it.

    Here's a file of his ads so you can see
    how the reader knew it was speaking to her or him.

    http://www.what-is-coaching.com/supp..._file_048b.pdf

    Enjoy!
    Doctor E. Vile
    This is old school marketing, and it was VERY effective, and I respect, and have studied Mel Martin in-depth, today because your customer looks at 10+ different products ALL promising the same thing, it's not nearly as effective as it once was.
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    • Profile picture of the author sethczerepak
      Originally Posted by ChrisNosal View Post

      ...today because your customer looks at 10+ different products ALL promising the same thing, it's not nearly as effective as it once was.
      According to who?

      Curious as to where you're getting your information on this.
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      • Profile picture of the author ChrisNosal
        Banned
        Originally Posted by sethczerepak View Post

        According to who?

        Curious as to where you're getting your information on this.
        If 20 years ago, you saw one book saying, "the world's greatest weight loss secret", and today, on the internet, where every marketer in the world is in the same place, you see 100s of books saying, "the world's greatest weight loss secret", you don't feel that diminishes the effectiveness of your message when you need have many others promising the same thing? And if you're not #1, and need new techniques to stand on top of the crowd, those techniques that worked when you were the only one in your niche would be just as effective in today's internet world?

        I'm always up for learning new things, and hearing others' perspectives.
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        • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
          Originally Posted by ChrisNosal View Post

          If 20 years ago, you saw one book saying, "the world's greatest weight loss secret", and today, on the internet, where every marketer in the world is in the same place, you see 100s of books saying, "the world's greatest weight loss secret", you don't feel that diminishes the effectiveness of your message when you need have many others promising the same thing?

          I'm always up for learning new things, and hearing others' perspectives.
          Are we both reading the same file of Mel Martin ads?

          Not one I see is he making claims of superiority like you say.

          Yet you are doing it yourself in your signature by saying
          "The Most Advanced Copywriting Course in the World".

          Kinda kills your argument, doesn't it?

          Best,
          Doctor E. Vile
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          • Profile picture of the author The Pines
            Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

            Are we both reading the same file of Mel Martin ads?

            Not one I see is he making claims of superiority like you say.

            Yet you are doing it yourself in your signature by saying
            "The Most Advanced Copywriting Course in the World".

            Kinda kills your argument, doesn't it?

            Best,
            Doctor E. Vile

            Added to which...


            Biography

            "I've spent years researching, learning, and am the most advanced copywriter on the planet."


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          • Profile picture of the author sethczerepak
            Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

            Are we both reading the same file of Mel Martin ads?

            Not one I see is he making claims of superiority like you say.

            Yet you are doing it yourself in your signature by saying
            "The Most Advanced Copywriting Course in the World".

            Kinda kills your argument, doesn't it?

            Best,
            Doctor E. Vile
            The lack of credible sources cited is what killed it for me. His response only adds more suspicion about a mere opinion stated which was stated as though it were fact. That's why I asked.

            Originally Posted by ChrisNosal View Post

            If 20 years ago, you saw one book saying, "the world's greatest weight loss secret", and today, on the internet, where every marketer in the world is in the same place, you see 100s of books saying, "the world's greatest weight loss secret", you don't feel that diminishes the effectiveness of your message when you need have many others promising the same thing? And if you're not #1, and need new techniques to stand on top of the crowd, those techniques that worked when you were the only one in your niche would be just as effective in today's internet world?

            I'm always up for learning new things, and hearing others' perspectives.
            Ah, no resources to cite then.

            So am I understanding you right that you were merely stating an opinion?
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            • Profile picture of the author ChrisNosal
              Banned
              Originally Posted by sethczerepak View Post

              The lack of credible sources cited is what killed it for me. His response only adds more suspicion about a mere opinion stated which was stated as though it were fact. That's why I asked.

              Ah, no resources to cite then.

              So am I understanding you right that you were merely stating an opinion?
              I love being wrong. It's how you learn and grow, and I love your willingness to challenge my assertions. That's how progress is made.

              When I said, "if 20 years ago, you saw"... I wasn't making a claim, I was asking your opinion, and of course anyone who wants to contribute. I was hoping to learn something that contradicted my thinking, and a get a different point of view I hadn't previously considered.

              Is there evidence that if 100 people say they have a "money making secret", versus one, hearing the same claim over and over, doesn't diminish the effectiveness of the statement?

              What I don't understand is, why wouldn't they buy the first product that promised the advantage, which would automatically diminish the effectiveness of the next 99 people offering the same product by the simple fact they didn't buy, when they would have if it was the only one on the shelf?

              There's plenty of evidence that if you put 100 books on a shelf instead of 1, and use Mel's traditional marketing style, while very effective for its time, the effectiveness of motivating customers to purchase your product will be diminished, because you no longer stand out, but instead blend in with everyone else using similar headlines.

              Customers will be looking at you, and many other products all promoting the same benefit, so your product no longer jumps out at the customer, since the core goal of a headline is to capture your customer's attention, interest, and stand out.

              Maybe that logic fails somewhere, and if it does I'd love to hear about how so I can learn something new, and see things from your perspective!

              I've given my reasoning and logic to support my view on this, and I'd love to hear your evidence to support your view that their effectiveness isn't diminished by saturation. I'm human, and can always be wrong.

              On my copywriting course being most advanced, despite almost a decade of study of marketing, I've not yet seen a comprehensive online course that dives into copywriting at this depth.

              I'd absolutely love to find an online course on this level, and if you have material contrary to my claim! I'd be so excited to get my hands on it! I want any and all recommendations!

              If you have any suggestions or recommendations of any free materials that may be more in-depth and advanced than my course, I'd be incredibly excited to learn from them!

              Any input, opinions, arguments that can help me learn and grow are much appreciated! I want to learn as much as I can from you guys about your experiences, and views, and areas of interest!

              Thanks too for all time invested in replies, attention to my post, and input too, and all future replies!
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              • Profile picture of the author sethczerepak
                Originally Posted by ChrisNosal View Post

                There's plenty of evidence that if you put 100 books on a shelf instead of 1, and use Mel's traditional marketing style, while very effective for its time, the effectiveness of motivating customers to purchase your product will be diminished, because you no longer stand out, but instead blend in with everyone else using similar headlines.
                I believe you're getting too focused on the verbage and the superficial techniques and that you missed the core principle in this swipe file.

                It's not about making some ballsy, puffed up claim that anybody and his cousin can mimic in their ads. It's something called "Positioning" - or "Angle Selling."

                Positioning, is creating a brand new category in the reader's mind, one which only your product can occupy -- a category which you can be the leader in. Not only does saturation NOT nullify this principle, it makes it more effective.

                Marketers who don't grasp this can only look at what everyone else is doing and mimic it, or try to convince you that they're "better." But if they don't absorb the principle behind the trends, they'll always be riding the coattails of the people who are CREATING the trends by reinventing what the product means to the consumer.

                Bottom line, change what the product means to the customer, and you might as well have invented a brand new species of product. Some examples are:

                1) Blueblockers: Joe Sugarman re-positioning a lousy pair of sunglasses as a full visual experience that could actually give you better eyesight.
                2) George Foreman Grill: George Foremen re-positioning a counter-top grill as a weight loss program.
                3) Juice man: a blender re-positioned as a revolutionary tool for improving your health, energy level and even fighting disease.
                4) The Snuggie: a friggin' robe turned around backwards and sold as a good night's sleep.
                5) Subway: regular ol' sub sandwiches re-positioned as a weight loss program.
                6) The Diamond: OMG, do some research on this one. BRILLIANT marketing job in turning what was once just another precious stone into a symbol of genuine love. The markups on this one are damn near criminal.

                Most of these ^ products were failing when some marketing genius got a hold of them and redefined what they meant to the customer. They "opted out" of the "here's how we're better" struggle and set themselves in a category of their own. Sure, someone else can jump on the "me too" bandwagon, claiming to offer the same thing.

                But in many cases, the marketer who FIRST secures that position in the customer's mind, puts themselves at the top of a mountain which the copycats will have a hell of a time climbing.

                I could give dozens of other examples, but if you're interested in reading more about this, grab one of Jack Trout's books on positioning. He has several books on the topic, the first of which was written in the "old school" era, and a few newer ones which have been written about how the SAME principle applies to the new market.

                The trick is to look past the specific examples shared and to look at the underlying principle. The examples themselves WILL go out of date. But the core principle and thought process which gave birth to them will not.
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                • Profile picture of the author ChrisNosal
                  Banned
                  Originally Posted by sethczerepak View Post

                  I believe you're getting too focused on the verbage and the superficial techniques and that you missed the core principle in this swipe file.

                  It's not about making some ballsy, puffed up claim that anybody and his cousin can mimic in their ads. It's something called "Positioning" - or "Angle Selling."

                  Positioning, is creating a brand new category in the reader's mind, one which only your product can occupy -- a category which you can be the leader in. Not only does saturation NOT nullify this principle, it makes it more effective.

                  Marketers who don't grasp this can only look at what everyone else is doing and mimic it, or try to convince you that they're "better." But if they don't absorb the principle behind the trends, they'll always be riding the coattails of the people who are CREATING the trends by reinventing what the product means to the consumer.

                  Bottom line, change what the product means to the customer, and you might as well have invented a brand new species of product. Some examples are:

                  1) Blueblockers: Joe Sugarman re-positioning a lousy pair of sunglasses as a full visual experience that could actually give you better eyesight.
                  2) George Foreman Grill: George Foremen re-positioning a counter-top grill as a weight loss program.
                  3) Juice man: a blender re-positioned as a revolutionary tool for improving your health, energy level and even fighting disease.
                  4) The Snuggie: a friggin' robe turned around backwards and sold as a good night's sleep.
                  5) Subway: regular ol' sub sandwiches re-positioned as a weight loss program.
                  6) The Diamond: OMG, do some research on this one. BRILLIANT marketing job in turning what was once just another precious stone into a symbol of genuine love. The markups on this one are damn near criminal.

                  Most of these ^ products were failing when some marketing genius got a hold of them and redefined what they meant to the customer. They "opted out" of the "here's how we're better" struggle and set themselves in a category of their own. Sure, someone else can jump on the "me too" bandwagon, claiming to offer the same thing.

                  But in many cases, the marketer who FIRST secures that position in the customer's mind, puts themselves at the top of a mountain which the copycats will have a hell of a time climbing.

                  I could give dozens of other examples, but if you're interested in reading more about this, grab one of Jack Trout's books on positioning. He has several books on the topic, the first of which was written in the "old school" era, and a few newer ones which have been written about how the SAME principle applies to the new market.

                  The trick is to look past the specific examples shared and to look at the underlying principle. The examples themselves WILL go out of date. But the core principle and thought process which gave birth to them will not.
                  I love this! Exactly what I needed to hear! Thanks so much for taking the time to write all that!
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                  • Profile picture of the author sethczerepak
                    Originally Posted by ChrisNosal View Post

                    I love this! Exactly what I needed to hear! Thanks so much for taking the time to write all that!
                    My pleasure Chris.
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                    • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
                      What Seth showed with his examples for re-positioning is normally beyond the scope and brief of copywriters because it resides with overall company strategy.

                      I re-positioned a carpet cleaner to be a dust mite removal specialist.

                      This was because despite using Joe Polish's marketing materials, he wasn't getting much needed
                      traction.

                      When all carpet cleaners use the words 'carpet cleaning' they are tuned out.

                      He became the first and only in that category.

                      Being first in the consumers mind keeps out the followers as they are seen as inferior copycats.

                      For more on Positioning and Re-Postioning Al Reis and Jack Trout
                      have 2 books on the subject.

                      Best,
                      Doctor E. Vile
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                      • Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

                        What Seth showed with his examples for re-positioning is normally beyond the scope and brief of copywriters because it resides with overall company strategy.

                        I re-positioned a carpet cleaner to be a dust mite removal specialist.

                        This was because despite using Joe Polish's marketing materials, he wasn't getting much needed
                        traction.

                        When all carpet cleaners use the words 'carpet cleaning' they are tuned out.

                        He became the first and only in that category.

                        Being first in the consumers mind keeps out*the followers as they are seen as inferior copycats.

                        For more on Positioning and Re-Postioning Al Reis and Jack Trout
                        have 2 books on the subject.

                        Best,
                        Doctor E. Vile


                        Oh shit man.... that's lethal! I bet that carpet cleaner became a king!


                        Good post/thread. Thanks a ton for those swipe files. I got a lot of ideas for targeting headlines!


                        "For New Yorkers Who Would Rather Ride Bikes than Subways, Buses, Cabs Or Cars If somebody sensible would just tell them:"


                        A headline like that is evergreen.
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                        Bring In More Cash For Your Business With High Caliber Copy
                        www.highcalibercopy.com

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  • Profile picture of the author TypingPandas
    Great and valuable share. Thanks a lot.

    Best,
    Typing Pandas
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  • Profile picture of the author joe golfer
    Also check out Blue Ocean Strategy to get similar insights on the stuff Seth was talking about (not an affil link):


    Blue Ocean Strategy: How to Create Uncontested...Blue Ocean Strategy: How to Create Uncontested...

    Blue Ocean Strategy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    http://www.blueoceanstrategy.com/
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    Marketing is not a battle of products. It is a battle of perceptions.
    - Jack Trout
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  • Profile picture of the author The Copy Nazi
    Banned
    "The worlds most advanced copywriting course" you say. And yet you start with this -
    The World's Most Advanced Copywriting Course.


    Success means having the freedom to live life, without having to rely on anyone else to make money.

    There is no more profitable skill on the planet than training in copywriting - it's the ultimate tool for transforming your hard work into CASH.

    If you can create compelling copy that SELLS, you instantly 99% of your competition, and make much more money than them.
    For starters, lose the period/full stop in the head. Interrupts the flow. Then...maybe you should think about proofing your world-beating copy huh?

    To wrap, you write
    Tap the arrow in the right corner to take this free copywriting training course, and master the techniques to sell anything to anyone.


    Why not spell it out? "Tap the arrow in the Bottom Right Corner". Which scrolls to the Opt-In. So why bother with the arrow? Just confuses things. Just tell them what you want them to do - i.e. opt-in.

    That's a lousy opt-in. No mention of not spamming my posterior?
    No irresistible offer? Is the page "responsive" (made for mobile phones)?
    Get these marketing tips (and more) sent straight to your inbox:


    could be much more compelling. Do I need to tell you how?
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  • Good headline for the thread to ahaha
    Signature

    Bring In More Cash For Your Business With High Caliber Copy
    www.highcalibercopy.com

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    • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
      Here's some examples of banner ads running this year
      calling out who they are speaking to...

      "To Investors Who Want To Retire Comfortably"

      "For Widows Who Want a Secure Financial Future"

      "Widows: Is a Financial Adviser Offering You a "Guarantee"?
      What You Need To Know Now"


      A great spy/research tool on tracking banner ads
      for repeat patterns is here...

      630+ fisher investments ads - Moat Ad Search

      Just type in company name in search bar and their banner ads,
      both past and present, show up.

      Click on the ad and it shows when the ad was seen running and where.

      Enjoy!
      Doctor E. Vile
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