GREAT article on the future of freelance copywriting

8 replies
Hats off to Roy Furr for penning a kick ass article on the future of freelance copywriting...

Is this the END of Freelance Copywriting? | Breakthrough Marketing Secrets

I couldn't agree more... write for your own products or partner with someone where you build equity and get paid based on what you bring in.

That way, you're not always scrounging for clients.

Great piece Roy!
#article #copywriting #freelance #future #great
  • Profile picture of the author marciayudkin
    Shawn, I do not agree. It's overblown for the sake of dramatics.

    Temperamentally, someone like me is NOT going to follow his advice.

    As for his option #1, I have no interest in getting involved with other people's projects, even getting equity for it. That means meetings (which I despise as soul-killing and a colossal waste of time), conflicts, compromises, tension and the like. Many copywriters share my loner temperament.

    As for option #2, that's totally out for me. More importantly, there are always going to be good clients out there who do not want or need copywriting employees.

    As for option #3, that's ridiculous. Some clients do suck. You can learn to avoid them and attract ones that treat you respectfully, pay on time and appreciate your work.

    Freelance copywriting has long been a viable business model and it still is if you are smart and persistent.

    I do like mixing it with other forms of work, like coaching and creating my own products - but that's mainly because I need variety and want to use a variety of skills.

    Marcia Yudkin
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    Check out Marcia Yudkin's No-Hype Marketing Academy for courses on copywriting, publicity, infomarketing, marketing plans, naming, and branding - not to mention the popular "Marketing for Introverts" course.
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  • Profile picture of the author RickDuris
    I think Roy did a great job explaining the benefits of several viable career strategies for an up and coming copywriter.

    Sure, he was dramatic. And opinionated.

    He had a position and he took it. I liked it.
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    • Profile picture of the author Complex
      [DELETED]
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      • Profile picture of the author Kay King
        Just once I'd like to see someone write an article on copywriting that doesn't reference the same examples from years ago.

        Entertaining to read perhaps - but no great insights or new ideas. From responses here, it may have attracted the attention he wanted and thus was a successful piece of copy.
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        • Profile picture of the author RickDuris
          Originally Posted by Kay King View Post

          Just once I'd like to see someone write an article on copywriting that doesn't reference the same examples from years ago.

          Entertaining to read perhaps - but no great insights or new ideas. From responses here, it may have attracted the attention he wanted and thus was a successful piece of copy.
          You'll have to buy his book if you want that.
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      • Profile picture of the author RickDuris
        Originally Posted by Complex View Post

        What's good for sales is not always good for learning.

        He's pre-selling his Amazon book. So he didn't list out the downsides. For copywriters who are learning - they need to know both the upside and the downside.

        Gary Halbert would NOT have gone to prison had he been on a royalty contract. But, by being part-owner, he was liable for fulfillment.

        Taking on equity should not be sold as a lottery ticket. You can actually make less money on an equity position than on a royalty contract. That IS possible. Not to mention the increase in legal liability.

        (Unless you have a sneaky contract the way venture capitalists do.)
        Complex, here's my proposal: If you trip across a serious equity participation deal, PM me. Obviously, you're not a fan of them and I love'em.

        PS: There's a referral fee in it for you if it closes.

        This goes for anyone else as well.
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  • Profile picture of the author shawnlebrun
    Marcia,

    Great points, and I wasn't saying his way was/is the only way.

    Heck, I've spent the last 14 years of my online life trying to find the perfect balance
    of what made me happy, what helped out a lot of people, and what was profitable enough for ME.

    That's the beauty of what you do, what I do, what Rick does, and all the awesome copywriters on this board can do.

    Once you learn the power of words and marketing... you can really do whatever the hell it is you want to do.

    Go after the money... life can suck.

    Go after JUST work you love... the money can suck.

    I think we ALL owe it to ourselves to carve out that special something that's meant just for US... and not be pigeonholed into being "a freelance copywriter" or an "info-marketer" or whatever label you want to slap on it.

    With the power and reach of the internet, and with the marketing and copy skills we have, we can literally create profitable businesses/projects out of thin air (idea)

    So, like I tell copywriters just starting out... just try and find something you enjoy, you can get better at, you feel you make a difference, and you make enough money.

    Because I see too many copywriters end up burnt out, or in the hospital for stress reasons, etc...

    Carve out your own little slice of happiness and profits... whatever that may be for each of us, and have fun doing it.

    That's all, I just liked Roy's post... it gives newer writers the option of knowing there's a whole lot of options out there.
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    • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
      Originally Posted by shawnlebrun View Post


      with the marketing and copy skills we have, we can literally create profitable businesses/projects out of thin air (idea)
      I've been able to transfer copywriting skills to teach a one call telephone closer.

      The student, first one for telemarketing, is now the #1 sales guy in Sweden's
      biggest media company in only his second month.

      He's never been in pure cold calling and never in a one call and get the money situation.

      Now I've started a new company because I now know how to recognize superstar one call closer's, how to recruit them, how to create their phone scripts, how to create a business model which matches a one call close set-up, how to create a commission package that get's superstars wanting to work the opportunity and also how to nurture them.

      Oh, plus have the deliverable s easily delivered like a machine.

      All this could never of happened if you didn't know how to sell to strangers
      one to many or one to one.

      Phone scripts have the same elements as a direct response ad.

      Grab attention
      Keep interest
      Pre-emt objections
      Match the product to what they already like
      Use the Law Of Consistency
      Use proof
      Create massive value in the package
      Tell them what's going to happen after the purchase
      Keep the asking for money smooth.

      So yeah, knowing how to sell to many
      can be transferred to one to one through cold calling
      which then can be powered by 100% superstar sales people.

      Best,
      Doctor E. Vile
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  • Profile picture of the author splitTest
    I was hoping for an analysis of why the traditional model of freelance copywriting is on its way out. Instead, the article just talks about alternatives to the traditional model, and why they may be less hassle and more profitable.

    Of course, this ignores the fact that you don't have to choose just one way or the other. Plus, the things he mentions (sucky clients, staff copywriters, royalty deals) have been around forever -- they're not contributing to the end of freelance copywriting in the least.

    I agree that the traditional model of freelance copywriting is probably on the decline with regard to viability, profitability, etc., but it would've been nice if the article explored the reasons why... & answered the question in its headline...
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