How much time do you yourself give between creating and editing?

10 replies
I was just reading an article on content creation and it got me thinking about how long you leave between the creative phase of copywriting and the logical phase of editing...

...and from your personal experience how much of a percentage of a project is spent on research, creation and the refining or editing component and why?

The article I was reading was from Sean d'Sousa and is located here The "Star Trek Theory" of Why We Struggle With Creating Content
#creating #editing #give #time
  • Profile picture of the author Raydal
    All depends on how extensive the project is, but for me 80%
    of my time is taken in planning and research, then 15% in
    writing and 5% in editing/adjusting the final copy.

    It's hard to write if you don't know WHAT you re writing about
    and easy to do so when your head is filled with IDEAS and a
    PLAN. The final adjustments you have to do afterwards to make
    sure everything sounds good and flows well doesn't take that much
    time IF you planned well.

    A tough part of the job for me is to force myself NOT to edit while
    I am writing. If you just allow the thought to flow and get them down
    on paper/screen, you will be a lot more productive.

    -Ray Edwards
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  • Profile picture of the author JamieFriedlander
    I agree with Raydal - I typically spend the majority of my time planning, researching and interviewing people (75 percent) and then I spend minimal time actually writing and editing (25 percent).

    For me, I find it beneficial to take a 2-3 day break between writing and editing. When I take a few days off to not think about or look at a piece of writing, I've found that I am much better at noticing structural issues, small errors, inconsistencies, etc.

    What do you typically do?
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    • Profile picture of the author Oziboomer
      Originally Posted by JamieFriedlander View Post

      I agree with Raydal - I typically spend the majority of my time planning, researching and interviewing people (75 percent) and then I spend minimal time actually writing and editing (25 percent).

      For me, I find it beneficial to take a 2-3 day break between writing and editing. When I take a few days off to not think about or look at a piece of writing, I've found that I am much better at noticing structural issues, small errors, inconsistencies, etc.

      What do you typically do?
      Thanks Jamie.

      From a writing point of view I like to get a flow going and get a good bulk of copy down when the message is seemingly being channelled and that is usually handwritten.

      Although I may read the handwritten flow afterwards and the next day or later I tend to leave it alone for a day or so.

      (love going back and reading them months later even though they may be old news by then)

      Sometimes during the compositing between handwritten and typed I edit minor areas as I feel necessary.

      From an artist type perspective when painting I often look at works upside down or on their side to get a different perspective.

      I think when it comes to modifying copy sometimes that filtering that is happening during the editing phase is where you are looking at the composition from an abstract view and also thinking logically as to what you change.
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      • For me, it's like a bird sickin' up food for its chicks.

        Research part takes a while, kinda like chompin' on a whole buncha worms while you keep your chicks warm and safe, but then

        eeeeeuuuuuuurrrrrrrrggggggggghh!!!

        man, that stuff gotta come out, gotta come out, and you just gotta let it splat where in hell it wants.

        So Raydal & Ozi are right — you gotta keep outta the way on the editin' at this stage or all your best, rawest stuff ain't gonna make it.

        Best chunks gonna get stuck in your teeth or swallowed back forever, and the regurgitary rorschach gonna come pre-figured with imagry, words & meanin'.

        Now you gotta figure on what to do with all that spewy stuff.

        It's a mess, it stinks, but no way ru gonna mop up now.

        Leave it, walk away.

        Come mornin', come the followin' evenin', when your stomach's quit hurtin' and the fruit of your gut is conjealin' into some kinda shape, that's when you get down on fancyin' it up it for someone else to consume.

        Eh-ditt-in'.

        Done good, editin' can transform a floor swillin' with goulash into Marco Pierre White's tastiest meatballs.

        So I guess my specialty is the throwin' up part, not 'cos I'm bulimic or nuthin', and I can fill the swill bucket real quick.

        Just get the darn stuff outta me.

        Research, I kinda skimp on, and I KNOW this makes me STOOPID.

        So most of my time is editin', polishin', tweezerin' out the slivers of worm, and 'new eyes' is exactly right: you gotta step back and come at it again like you ain't never seen it before.

        Zen mind, and all that shit.
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        Lightin' fuses is for blowin' stuff together.

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    • Profile picture of the author Raydal
      Originally Posted by JamieFriedlander View Post

      For me, I find it beneficial to take a 2-3 day break between writing and editing. When I take a few days off to not think about or look at a piece of writing, I've found that I am much better at noticing structural issues, small errors, inconsistencies, etc.

      What do you typically do?
      Good tip. The time between writing and editing is important so you can
      "forget" what you wrote and come back to it with new eyes. No joking,
      I have been "wowed" by some sales letters only to find out eventually that
      I wrote the letter but had forgotten about them. (Ever heard the preacher said that
      he got so good at preaching that sometimes he wants to stop and take notes
      on himself?)

      Other things that help with editing is to change the font, size, color, copy to
      a new program--anything that makes the writing look different. It's easier
      to pick up on mistakes that way.

      -Ray Edwards
      Signature
      The most powerful and concentrated copywriting training online today bar none! Autoresponder Writing Email SECRETS
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      • Profile picture of the author JamieFriedlander
        Originally Posted by Raydal View Post

        Good tip. The time between writing and editing is important so you can
        "forget" what you wrote and come back to it with new eyes. No joking,
        I have been "wowed" by some sales letters only to find out eventually that
        I wrote the letter but had forgotten about them. (Ever heard the preacher said that
        he got so good at preaching that sometimes he wants to stop and take notes
        on himself?)

        Other things that help with editing is to change the font, size, color, copy to
        a new program--anything that makes the writing look different. It's easier
        to pick up on mistakes that way.

        -Ray Edwards
        I never thought about changing the font, color, etc. when editing. Such a unique idea! I'm going to try that next time.
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        • Profile picture of the author Oziboomer
          Originally Posted by JamieFriedlander View Post

          I never thought about changing the font, color, etc. when editing. Such a unique idea! I'm going to try that next time.
          This tip is valuable.

          I'll explain a different situation in relation to producing artwork that was a technique used in the past but is often overlooked today.

          An artist would use a "black mirror" created by painting the back of a piece of glass with black paint.

          They would then view the scene in the black mirror to get a different view...usually a more tonal one than one that was cluttered with color.

          By changing the font or font size you are tricking the mind into taking a different look at the output and this could shorten the dwell time...thanks Ray.
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  • Profile picture of the author gjabiz
    In many instances, the client has put a time frame on their promotion. If they want the ad to appear in the Thanksgiving Day issue of ______, then you need to have final copy approved and ready by their publishing deadline.

    So, I like to start at the end, how much time do I have? Then knowing there is a process, like going through a legal dept., and copy editors or the boss, and then knowing how fast I write...

    most of my time, over 60% is on research (mulling over) 25% on writing the remainder for editing.

    But, it varies project by project, and a rule of thumb, the sooner the deadline, the more I would charge...if the client puts copy at the end, then he is going to pay through his nose to get it, cause, he's stupid.

    gjabiz







    Originally Posted by Oziboomer View Post

    I was just reading an article on content creation and it got me thinking about how long you leave between the creative phase of copywriting and the logical phase of editing...

    ...and from your personal experience how much of a percentage of a project is spent on research, creation and the refining or editing component and why?

    The article I was reading was from Sean d'Sousa and is located here The "Star Trek Theory" of Why We Struggle With Creating Content
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[10320959].message }}
  • Yeah, gotta reframe, de-&re-POV.

    The more angles you got, the more mis-hit fails you gonna see before you bowl a winner.

    *Mind Warrior Neurotwango Alert*

    Either that, or you morph into a fruitcake.
    Signature

    Lightin' fuses is for blowin' stuff together.

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