How do you know which formula to use?

5 replies
I went through Copy Ranger's 21 Incredible Copywriting Formulas (I use) and I think the list of formulas serves as a huge help. The only thing I am a little confused about is the process of deciding which formula should be used when putting together a sales piece. How do you do it?
#formula
  • Profile picture of the author Raydal
    Originally Posted by BetterByDay View Post

    I went through Copy Ranger's 21 Incredible Copywriting Formulas (I use) and I think the list of formulas serves as a huge help. The only thing I am a little confused about is the process of deciding which formula should be used when putting together a sales piece. How do you do it?
    Very good question.

    There is a basic level to all of those formulas. The one you choose
    would depend on a number of factors:

    1.How aware/ informed is your market about your product.
    2. Are they for or opposed to your product
    3. The price point of your offer
    4. Do they know they have the problem your product solves?
    5. How your product compares to that of your competition?

    For example, Michel Fortin's Q.U.E.S.T Formula works very well for introducing
    new products to the market.

    -Ray Edwards
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    The most powerful and concentrated copywriting training online today bar none! Autoresponder Writing Email SECRETS
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  • Profile picture of the author KinneyJ2014
    Here's three of my favorite formulas because it reminds me to stay focused on the goals of the copy and the benefits to the reader.

    Keep the writing clear, keep it concise, find a compelling angle to write from, and write with credibility that what you're promising can be trusted to happen.


    The 4 U's
    Useful - Be useful to the reader
    Urgent - Provide a sense of urgency
    Unique - Convey the idea that the main benefit is somehow unique
    Ultra-specific - Be ultra-specific with all of the above

    Attention - Interest - Desire - Action (AIDA)
    Attention - Get the reader's attention
    Interest - Interesting and fresh information that appeals to the reader
    Desire - Benefits of your product/service/idea and proof that it does what you say
    Action - Ask for a response
    Signature
    Set S.M.A.R.T. goals
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  • Profile picture of the author wordsandthebees
    Can I add #22 to that list?
    FYG formula 'follow your gut'!!

    If you've done your research before you've picked up your pen it's likely that you're already in the mind of your target market and you know exactly what will sell the product to them. Write it!

    While it's great to have formulas and technical guidance to refer to, I do think that we can over-complicate the naturally creative process when we start including things that don't need to be in our writing.

    When you have a formula to follow, your writing can become sterile and unemotive so it's good to let your creativity flow as much as possible. I was talking in jest about following my gut however it does play a large part in my work.

    Here's the framework I use for my writing and so far, so good:

    1) Create engagement
    2) Describe your product
    3) Make your ask.

    However that works best depends on who I'm writing for. Having free reign to write whatever I feel is what I love about being a copywriter so I'd find it really difficult to follow rules and regulations every time I had to write something!

    Have you tried any of them to see what suits your individual style best?
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    • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
      Originally Posted by wordsandthebees View Post

      Can I add #22 to that list?
      FYG formula 'follow your gut'!!
      An experienced copywriter can 'follow his gut' because he has internalized the FLOW of successful sales letters.

      (That's what formulas are - FLOWS)

      A new copywriter?

      Not so much... following his gut is a recipe for disaster.

      Alex
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      • Profile picture of the author wordsandthebees
        Originally Posted by Alex Cohen View Post

        An experienced copywriter can 'follow his gut' because he has internalized the FLOW of successful sales letters.

        (That's what formulas are - FLOWS)

        A new copywriter?

        Not so much... following his gut is a recipe for disaster.

        Alex
        Very true. I had (perhaps mistakenly) worked on the assumption that Betterbyday had experience as a copywriter. Perhaps they can clarify?
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