For CopyWriters Only: How fast do you type

by lena111 18 replies
Please post here how fast you type as well as your accuracy.

Just a benchmark
#copywriting #copywriters #fast #type
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  • Profile picture of the author Chris Ramsey
    Originally Posted by Paul McQuillan View Post

    what the hell?



    that took 10 minutes
    You took my joke. *******.

    And where's my bid for $250
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  • Profile picture of the author Darrel Hawes
    I don't understand the relevance of this question.

    We don't get paid by the word.

    Plus, many/some writers use voice recognition software for their first draft.

    Some of the best copywriters have horrible typing skills and do not type fast at all...

    ... but that has no bearing on the end product.

    If the question was directed at content writers, who get paid per article or whatever, then the question may make sense... except that many/some of them use voice recognition software too.
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    • Profile picture of the author lena111
      Originally Posted by Darrel Hawes View Post

      I don't understand the relevance of this question.

      We don't get paid by the word.

      Plus, many/some writers use voice recognition software for their first draft.

      Some of the best copywriters have horrible typing skills and do not type fast at all...

      ... but that has no bearing on the end product.

      If the question was directed at content writers, who get paid per article or whatever, then the question may make sense... except that many/some of them use voice recognition software too.

      Sorry if I have offended you Darrel. I am trying to benchmark if I can be a copywriter because I just finished typing master. Also, thank you for this informative post. I realized that there are voice recognition softwares that can do this.
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  • Profile picture of the author travlinguy
    50 words per minute with 3 - 4 mistakes per page. I learned typing back in high school and it has been a blessing.
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  • Profile picture of the author Dean Dhuli
    Well, I type really fast but when it comes to writing sales letters
    I am really nitpicky and slow.


    - Dean


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  • Profile picture of the author Ken Strong
    a couo;pdohi hibndre d woifr a minfg.
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  • Even though people type 25 WPM or 125 WPM, I believe that is irrelevant to effectively copywriting skills.

    To proficiently write copy, the copy must move your target market to act. When you write copy that motivates your ideal prospect they see the value in buying your solution to their problem. In order to write copy that gets your ideal prospects to embrace change, I believe we must really know the intention, the purpose and the motivation driving a potential prospect to solve his or her problem using your solution in the form of a specific product or service.

    Another key to writing efficient, successful sales copy is explaining that your intention is to help your customer achieve a specific sales goal. You do that by writing sales letter copy to the mindset of your customer. That means that sometimes the copy may sound unfamiliar to your customer. But, as you explain to your customer that the copy will sound, enticing and appealing to your customer’s readers, your customer might understand why we write the way we write.

    In other words, in order to develop effective sales letter writing skills that result in high conversion rates for your customer, the words in your sales letter or marketing materials must sound like the same words and phrases and thought patterns of your customer’s target market. This can be confusing for your customer.

    For example, suppose your customer is an automobile company. And your customer’s target is mothers with young families. If you desire to write copy that appeals to a mother with young children, you’ve got to tap into the emotion of that type of woman in that type of situation.

    If you simply tell her the features of how a car transports her children to and from school, dance lessons, guitar lessons, baseball games, etc., that’s not enough. That’s too practical for most woman. Instead, you’ve got to demonstrate by using descriptive text and phrases how the children, because of the safe traveling done back and forth to their extracurricular activities, makes possible for them to develop their natural talents and skills to live their dreams and create happy childhood memories. The happy childhood memories are important to the mother.

    Women really care about their children. When you can associate a car (or van) as being an important tool to create a happy memory for a mother’s children, and the reason that she buys the car (or van) in her mind is to make possible happy memories for her children, that is the mark of affective and effective copy.

    The copy has affects that EFFECT something considered vitally important to the mother--how to make happy memories for her family life. So, your copy must be affective and effective so the mother sees the value in buying that particular car or van.

    The mother is one of the decision-makers in buying the car. Talking to decision-makers in affective and effective copy, you begin to see how influential and persuasive copy helps people achieve goals they really desire to achieve anyway. Some people just need a little nudge so they can align their priorities correctly.

    After writing copy for several years, I really think the key element in people choosing to buy as a result of reading copy has to do with helping them see the value in changing and accepting something that initially seems unfamiliar. If you purposely write copy to help people add value to their lives and truly achieve their goals simply because you genuinely care to see people feel happy, that is the mark of an effective copywriter. I encourage you to make your motto be to write copy so that it’s easy for people to see the value in risking doing the unfamiliar to achieve their most passionate dreams.

    Susan





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  • Profile picture of the author Kevin Lam
    I'm feeling lazy this morning... had a nice break... still want to keep taking my break, lol, but I know I need to work.

    Anyway, I type about 75 WPM casually and when I'm in the zone, I'm at 110 WPM. Not that it matters really because when it comes to copywriting, I slow down.

    I'm the type of person that has to type it out rather than using a speech recognition software, because I can only think and type, but not think and say it aloud, lol. I fumble over my own words and my thoughts are lost. This is why I always lose an argument with the wife, lol. SOMETIMES I win... it's when I blackout and my subconscious takes over - j/k.... or am I?
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  • Profile picture of the author nemock
    I think typing is a beneficial skill. When I couldn't type I'd argue that it didn't matter. The end result was all that was important. Then, I decided to learn how to really type and develop an "unconscious competence" for it. The result was that I found I didn't just experience a productivity increase, I experienced a less quantifiable creativity increase.

    As for my typing speed: it ranges from 80 to 105 WPM, depending on what I'm doing. I think the relevant point is that the competence has a material yield.

    Dave
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  • Profile picture of the author Kevin Lam
    Well, not that it matters, but the question is like the weird question I had last week when someone confronted me with "how long does it take to write a 2-6% solid sales letter?"

    Time is irrelevant, as such, typing speed is irrelevant to the selling capability of the sales letter.
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  • Profile picture of the author DougBarger
    You're asking about a transcriptionist.
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    • Profile picture of the author Kay King
      I think Doug nailed it. I can transcribe at 100 wpm. However, when writing original copy it's the words that count - not the speed at which you type them.

      The only benefit my typing skills offer is this: as a touch typist I don't look at the keyboard so I can stare off into space composing what I'm saying as I go or read the text on the monitor as I type it.

      But I'll be making the transition to word recognition software soon as it types faster than a human can - without any wrist pain.

      kay
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  • Profile picture of the author BiancaRaven
    My typing speed is 106 words per minute with 99.3% accuracy when I'm writing emails or manuscripts where the ideas just flow out of my head, but the typing speed drops dramatically to around 20-25 wpm when I'm considering every word of a client's copy very carefully before getting it down.
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