If you had to recommend one book...

45 replies
Hey, I have a quick question.

I'm trying to improve my copywriting skills, not necessarily to get clients, but for my own business.

I've written a couple of sales pages before in the Internet Marketing niche which have performed decently, but not at the level I want them too.

So, I am going back to the basics and am deciding between two books to read:

1. Breakthrough Advertising by Eugene Schwartz

or...

2. Advertising Secrets of the Written Word by Joseph Sugarman

Which out of those two books would you recommend?

Please don't say read them both... I know each book is highly respected and valuable, but I just want to improve my copywriting skills overall. I'm not interested in becoming a professional A-List copywriter for hire or anything like that.

I just want to have the tools to go into any market, whip out a sales page fairly quickly, and have it convert extremely well.

Which book would you recommend me to read out of the ones listed above?

P.S: I'm finishing up reading "Influence" by Robert Cialdini, and am going to start reading "Great Leads" by Michael Masterson soon.
#book #copywriting #eugenze schwartz #joseph sugarman #recommend #recommendation
  • Profile picture of the author Andrew Gould
    It's not easy to tell you how to get to where you want to be without knowing where you currently are.

    That said, for a refresher in the basics Sugarman's book is the one to go with.
    Signature

    Andrew Gould

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    • Profile picture of the author Edwin Torres
      Originally Posted by Andrew Gould View Post

      It's not easy to tell you how to get to where you want to be without knowing where you currently are.

      That said, for a refresher in the basics Sugarman's book is the one to go with.
      I wouldn't say I'm a pro, but I wouldn't say I'm a complete beginner either. I'm familiar with how to make a headline, bullets, and how to structure a sales letter (state problem, hint at solution, tell them how you discovered solution, etc.).

      But, my sales letters don't convert as well as I would like them too. That's why I wanted to see which out of the two books (if I had to read one) would help me.
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  • Hellor Edwin,

    Originally Posted by Edwin Torres View Post

    So, I am going back to the basics and am deciding between two books to read:

    1. Breakthrough Advertising by Eugene Schwartz

    or...

    2. Advertising Secrets of the Written Word by Joseph Sugarman

    Which out of those two books would you recommend?
    This is a tough question. I own both and have read both. Both are of great value to me.

    But my choice would be...

    Breakthrough Advertising

    I must disclose: I started rereading this book today. So I have a bias at this point in time.

    But honestly, if you really want to get back to the basics, where a writer shows you, through his own letters, and explains his results, and how he adapted them to different industries, I'd read the 1937 version (466 page hardcover) "The Robert Collier Letter Book"

    I just spent the last week reading that book. You can't get more basic than Collier's book.
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    • Profile picture of the author Edwin Torres
      Originally Posted by ThePromotionalGuy View Post

      Hellor Edwin,



      This is a tough question. I own both and have read both. Both are of great value to me.

      But my choice would be...

      Breakthrough Advertising

      I must disclose: I started rereading this book today. So I have a bias at this point in time.

      But honestly, if you really want to get back to the basics, where a writer shows you, through his own letters, and explains his results, and how he adapted them to different industries, I'd read the 1937 version (466 page hardcover) "The Robert Collier Letter Book"

      I just spent the last week reading that book. You can't get more basic than Collier's book.
      I'm kind of shying away from Breakthrough Advertising because I've heard it's veryyyyy heavy and dry.

      Also, I want to freshen up on the basics, while still learning new things to improve my copy overall.
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      • Hellor Edwin

        Originally Posted by Edwin Torres View Post

        I'm kind of shying away from Breakthrough Advertising because I've heard it's veryyyyy heavy and dry.

        Also, I want to freshen up on the basics, while still learning new things to improve my copy overall.
        Nothing could be further from the truth. This book is only 236 pages. How deep do you think Schwartz can get in a read that would take about 2-3 days to get through?

        I can assure you, once you read it, you won't be able to stop from writing copy that converts.

        But only pick that book up when you're ready to advance to that stage in your career.
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  • Profile picture of the author selvaa4n
    So You Think You Can Write? book is recommended.
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  • You always want a copywriter to prove they have (and read) "Breakthrough Advertising."

    At least you can do a quick test on the ownership...

    Before your hire them ask what the first sentence is on the second paragraph on Page 77.

    I had to wait almost 20 years to get a copy (it was out of print for ages until Boardroom republished it) - many said after reading it - it's like getting a doctorate in advertising and marketing.

    To me it's got to be the best ever "how to" copywriting book ever written.


    Steve
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    • Hellor Steve,

      Originally Posted by Steve The Copywriter View Post

      You always want a copywriter to prove they have (and read) "Breakthrough Advertising."

      At least you can do a quick test on the ownership...

      Before your hire them ask what the first sentence is on the second paragraph on Page 77.
      "Advertising is salesmanship in print. Therefore, above everything else, advertising is the literature of desire" -pg 77 Sentence 1&2
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  • Just outta interest, when was it this book "broke through" ?

    Forgive me, but I am stoopid right now.

    I would personallya gone with Breakout Advertising — but I was not around to have written it.

    Even Outbreak Advertising eludes me, inspitea my various boredomfeedsa nooz.

    Prolly I woulda written Advertising "Outbreak"

    I would want my activest -ing verbs always to link hard with perfectly quotable definitions of what is gowin' on with upclose NOW beyond the shocka its propulsitory transmisso.
    Signature

    Lightin' fuses is for blowin' stuff togethah.

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  • Maybe in 1966 when it was first published "Breakthrough" was the epitome of cool.

    I do like Breakout - I don't know why but it reminds me of having a full english fry up in the local cafe.

    No, no that would be "Breakfastout"
    .
    Maybe I need a coffee and a sandwich to keep me going until dinner.


    Steve
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  • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
    The best book I've seen on copywriting is, "How To Make a Fortune Mailing Simple Postcards" by Steve The Copywriter.

    Well, I haven't actually seen it. I'm hoping it gets written someday.

    Alex
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  • Alex it's nearly finished!

    I've just got to put the "table of contents" on the other side of the card and it's done.


    Steve
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  • Yes! and the extra sentence.

    Now any aspiring clients who want the best copywriters will have to ask another "test" question.

    Shouldn't be a problem - there's plenty of paragraphs in the book.


    Steve
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  • Profile picture of the author vovanfree
    After reviewing it I would suggest you to read advertising secrets. While I also mention reading a book can improve your vocabulary but it won't provide information about any niche. You will have to search and write every thing .Even if you are expert , you will have to search and find some thing unique and new.
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  • Profile picture of the author havplenty
    Originally Posted by Edwin Torres View Post


    1. Breakthrough Advertising by Eugene Schwartz

    or...

    2. Advertising Secrets of the Written Word by Joseph Sugarman


    P.S: I'm finishing up reading "Influence" by Robert Cialdini, and am going to start reading "Great Leads" by Michael Masterson soon.
    Breakthrough Advertising isn't particularly basic. I believe Masterson has echoed the same sentiment somewhere. But read it anyway; if nothing else, you'll get some insight about how to approach your copy.

    Read Masterson's Great Leads and follow it up with Architecture of Persuasion.

    And read How to Get Rich by Felix Dennis. Pay close attention to the style and tone of his writing. He wasn't a copywriter but I bet he could have competed against the best of them.
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  • Profile picture of the author silveroaks
    i will not read Breakthrough Advertising by Euge myself and hence will not recommend it as well because the book does not have that ability to glue you to the pages.
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  • I bet many who have "Breakthrough Advertising" haven't actually read it (or all of it).

    Good news because it gives us who have a HUGE advantage.

    I mentioned earlier that I had to (eagerly) wait about 20 years to get a copy - so you might have thought I quickly breezed through it.

    If only…

    It took 5 reads before I grasped it all. It was hellishly difficult.

    The book is definitely not written like a Schwartz Ad. More the polar opposite. It's a deep "academic" read. I felt that virtually every sentence was a full on "thesis" on advertising (it's fair to say that many are).

    But however tough it is to wade through and no matter how many times you have to read it.

    It is so worth it.

    Because the knowledge you gain - when you're finally able to "wire" it all in - is priceless.


    Steve
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    • Hellor Steve,

      Originally Posted by Steve The Copywriter View Post

      I bet many who have "Breakthrough Advertising" haven't actually read it (or all of it).

      Good news because it gives us who have a HUGE advantage.

      I mentioned earlier that I had to (eagerly) wait about 20 years to get a copy - so you might have thought I quickly breezed through it.

      If only...

      It took 5 reads before I grasped it all. It was hellishly difficult.

      The book is definitely not written like a Schwartz Ad. More the polar opposite. It's a deep "academic" read. I felt that virtually every sentence was a full on "thesis" on advertising (it's fair to say that many are).

      But however tough it is to wade through and no matter how many times you have to read it.

      It is so worth it.

      Because the knowledge you gain - when you're finally able to "wire" it all in - is priceless.


      Steve
      I'm with you about wishing I had this book back in 93' when I first started writing copy.

      It wasn't until years later Brian Kurtz sent me a copy. Come to think of it, about 2 years ago is when he sent it to me. The moment I got it, I dove right in. Cover to cover.

      "A-Ha" moments and shaking my head "Yep, yep, that's right" pummeled my thoughts.

      Since then I've read it multiple times. Each time curled up in a blanket with hot, burn the top of your mouth, cocoa. With each new read, I always come away learning something new or reinforcing a practice and a blister.

      But honestly, having a sales background myself and owning multiple service businesses, it has never been a hard or deep read for me.

      When I read the words and explanations about:

      Identification, Gradualization, Intensification, Character Roles, Achievement Roles & etc...

      I'm reading with eyes of an existing business owner/salesman and seeing basic sales 101 training being broken down and explained to it's lowest common denominator.

      Beliefisms twisted and turned to sell the reader on how to look at selling in print, the market, the reader, desires, wants, needs and understand the mechanics behind it.

      Sales jargon from an advertising/copy writing point of view, if you will.

      But as mentioned, that's how it comes across to me. What I read makes complete and practical sales sense.

      But the deep academic read is just not there for me.

      Or maybe I'm just a loon... Who knows?

      But my recommendation for the OP is still "Breakthrough Advertising"

      Chinchilla
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  • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
    I agree with Breakthrough Advertising too.

    His idea of market awareness is more relevant today than ever.

    If you look at the speed in which markets become fully aware
    of a repeated message by more than one advertiser, then
    you'll realize it becomes a lost cause coming out with a similar message.

    Market awareness is the foundation where everything else is attached to it.

    Just about every ad you see is written as if the writer has
    ignored what the reader has already seen, listened and watched,
    hence the dismal results from paid advertising.

    It transfers over to one call close phone sales too.

    Gene goes into depth on how to recognize what level of market awareness
    your prospective buyers are in and how to create a message that fits each stage of awareness.

    Nail this part before you ever write a word and you are on your way to a breathtaking breakthrough.

    Best,
    Ewen
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  • The bit that caused me the most "thought" because it took a while to really get the meaning...

    Stage 5 - Sophistication Of Your Market - this is when - the market disbelieves everything in an Ad.

    No matter how genuinely wonderful the "thing" is - nobody wants it because they won't read the wondrous words. In a world saturated with Ads they've heard it all before. And have been disappointed and let down time and time again.

    Or they assume they already know what you're about to say, muttering "It's never going to be the answer, doesn't/won't/can't work, waste of time, might be Ok for others but not me, I'll stick with what I've got even though it's more or less useless" etc, etc.

    So (at least initially) if you dare mention the product, it's mechanisms or the benefits you are likely to get tons of sale resistance.

    The answer? - call out to the prospects deepest emotions, their state of mind in essence exactly how they are feeling - do this in a single statement.

    It's what Team Makepeace call a dominant emotional headline (it's 1000 times more powerful than just "entering the conversation the prospect is having in their head").

    Get this headline right… (to reinforce it I tend to write a prehead and a subhead as well).

    And when prospects see it and strongly identify with it they can’t help but read on.

    Then build up the problem, reveal the benefits of finding the solution, give them the solution, and prove you’ve got the best possible solution and entice them with an irresistible offer to get the solution.

    Do all this my using the other techniques in "Breakthrough Advertising". Including Identification, Gradualization, Intensification, Character Roles, Achievement etc... (as mentioned by Promo Guy in thread 19).

    The response can be truly amazing.


    Steve


    P.S. The credit for this information must go to Mr Eugene Schwartz and "The Screaming Eagle" published by Mr Clayton Makepeace and his team.
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    • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
      Originally Posted by Steve The Copywriter View Post

      The bit that caused me the most "thought" because it took me a while to really get the meaning...

      Stage 5 - Sophistication of Your Market - this is when - the market disbelieves everything in an Ad.

      No matter how genuinely wonderful the "thing" is - nobody wants it because they won't read it.

      So (at least initially) if you dare mention the product, it's mechanisms or the benefits you are likely to get tons of sale resistance.

      The cure? - Call out to the Prospect deepest emotions, their state of mind in essence exactly how they are feeling in a single statement.

      It's what Team Makepeace call a dominant emotional headline.

      When your prospects see this style of headline and identify with it so strongly they can’t help but read on.

      Then you build up the problem, reveal the benefits of finding the solution, give them the solution, and prove you’ve got the best possible solution and then get them to act on the offer.

      The response can be truly amazing.

      Steve
      I recall Carline Anglade Cole's headline for an eyesight remedy
      tackling the customer scepticism about 2 ingredients head on....

      Why [X] And [Y] Don't Work

      The ingredients in the product she was writing for
      were the same as in the headline.

      She turned the negative into a positive by giving evidence all others
      were of such low dose that they wouldn't work.

      Of course, it went on to become a control.

      And yes the theme played to the reader's dominant emotion
      about those ingredients for eyesight remedies.

      That's one of many examples I could come up with, including
      ones I've written.

      Best,
      Ewen

      P.S. Great subject btw.
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    • Hellor Steve,

      Originally Posted by Steve The Copywriter View Post

      The bit that caused me the most "thought" because it took a while to really get the meaning...

      Stage 5 - Sophistication Of Your Market - this is when - the market disbelieves everything in an Ad.

      No matter how genuinely wonderful the "thing" is - nobody wants it because they won't read the wondrous words. In a world saturated with Ads they've heard it all before. And have been disappointed and let down time and time again.

      Or they assume they already know what you're about to say, muttering "It's never going to be the answer, doesn't/won't/can't work, waste of time, might be Ok for others but not me, I'll stick with what I've got even though it's more or less useless" etc, etc.

      So (at least initially) if you dare mention the product, it's mechanisms or the benefits you are likely to get tons of sale resistance.
      Stage 5 - My Firsthand Encounter - Years Later Confirmed Through Breakthrough Advertising

      In 1995 this stage took North America by storm in the auto industry. Primarily Ford Motors. Some might argue GM back in 84 on the Corvette but they had a visual in place. (Security Diode Shown Here)



      Two years earlier I had opened a little automotive/truck locksmith business. I wrote sales letters and ads promoting my services.

      In those days generating a lost or duplicating vehicle keys, from Bugatti to Ford, Bentley to Dodge, Rolls to Datsun (For Nissan Haters) always the same process. Pure mechanical.

      Those fledgling copy writing efforts paid off handsomely the first 2 years with my market...

      until...

      Well out rolls the 1995 Ford Taurus SHO and Ford Mustang GT models. Unbeknownst to the public and kept hidden from the after market service businesses, these vehicles came equipped, from the factory, with Transponder (computer chip) key technology.

      This system could not be removed, disabled or bypassed. It controlled the fuel pump, injectors, relays, starter and security alarm system. When the correct programmed key turned in the ignition, the computer authorized all these features to fully function.

      When turning a non-programmed key in the ignition, nothing happened. Vehicle appeared to have a dead battery.

      What looked like a regular key, with a large black head, but mounted in that bow (part of key you hold) the end user doesn't get to see the glass chip. (Shown here).

      And if the public can't see it, it doesn't exist.



      Here's where Stage 5 bit my business in the ass.

      Customers did not, would not, short of calling me a heretic, believe their new Ford vehicle had computer chip keys, which first had to be mechanically made, to turn in the locks, but now had to be programmed into the vehicle's on board computer with a Hickok made NGS programmer (Shown Here), to start the car.



      Side Bar: The Hickok NGS programmer/diagnostic tool was created for and only sold to authorized Ford Motor Company service departments in those days. Eventually a class action lawsuit found Ford guilty of knowingly preventing aftermarket service centers from assisting their customers, forcing the public to go back to the dealer. End Side Bar.

      No amount of sales letters I wrote, advertising diagrams I created - the market just didn't believe me. Car dealers were dropping me as a service provider.

      There were many times these business owners would argue with me about this - thinking I was trying to blow them off. Sadly I couldn't help them because only the dealer could generate these keys and no aftermarket service provider could get their hands on this programmer.

      It was like rolling a concrete boulder up a muddy steep incline. Eventually I got away from the vehicle market and went straight to commercial and department of defense contract hardware servicing and electronic access control system installation and troubleshooting.

      I said all that to reinforce the truth of Stage 5. It is a business killer.

      Chincilla
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  • As you know the lovely Carline was a Makepeace protégée.


    Steve
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    • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
      Originally Posted by Steve The Copywriter View Post

      As you know the lovely Carline was a Makepeace protégée.

      Steve
      Yep, I dined with her and her kids at my niece's husband's
      restaurant when they were in Auckland.

      She went gaga for our lamb and beef.

      Best,
      Ewen
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  • I'm not surprised she liked the lamb.

    It's very popular here in the UK.


    Steve
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  • Promo,

    To me that hit the proverbial nail bang on the head.

    The part that always "confused" me about Stage 5 until the 5th reading of the book is - no matter how hard you try sometimes there just isn't a workable answer.

    Never easy to accept this or explain it to a client.

    Fortunately you did understand.


    Steve
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    • Profile picture of the author havplenty
      Originally Posted by Steve The Copywriter View Post

      Promo,

      To me that hit the proverbial nail bang on the head.

      The part that always "confused" me about Stage 5 until the 5th reading of the book is - no matter how hard you try sometimes there just isn't a workable answer.

      Never easy to accept this or explain it to a client.

      Fortunately you did understand.


      Steve
      Stage 5 can ruin a business for sure. But its also where the brands live. I heard Joe Sugarman say once in an interview, that the ultimate aim of marketing is to build a brand.

      Really clever positioning can, I think, massage a stage 5 market. Avis did this with its "We Try Harder" campaign.

      The way I think about it, a stage 5 market still has problems and still wants them solved. In promo's scenario people still needed new keys to get their vehicles going. The proprietary nature of the new system was what really killed his business in the end. Short of having the programmer on hand there was no point in even advertising... The writing was on the wall the moment the new keys came into play. (I hope I understood your scenario correctly, Promo).

      Eugene Schwartz really got into the bowels of marketing and understanding the consumer. As practicioners, we are all better for it.


      Hav
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      • Hellor Hav,

        Fortunately in those days there were plenty of vehicles that still hadn't made the switch over to immobilizer systems. I saw the writing on the wall earlier enough and began phasing out vehicle worked.

        Turned the business towards commercial work which led to a door opening to be a contractor for Department of Defense.

        All in all. It was a better move. Great experience. No regrets.

        Chincilla
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  • It's a fair point.

    But one other critical factor Schwartz made is - you can't create "desire." Even if it SHOULD exist.

    Instead you have to channel [I]existing[/I desire (and it has to be a mass desire).

    If for whatever reason the "desire" is not there or rightly or wrongly has "gone."

    And this and other reasons creates a Stage 5 problem… which would cost fortunes to "fix"

    My view is it may be best to move on.


    Steve


    P.S. Lets say we have a client with 1,025 massive warehouses spread across the US of A.

    Each one crammed to the rafters with pristine, top marque " 99% as good as DVD's" video players selling for $25.00 (sensationally reduced from $5,500).

    Buy one and you can legally get every major movie and TV show on tape for a mere $1.00.

    You know what? - we could never realistically sell enough of them - because despite the incredible quality and price there is no mass desire for "old fashioned" home entertainment systems.
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  • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
    Schwartz was wrong... you can create desire.

    Through education.

    Education can take an individual who is oblivious or apathetic and turn him into a rabid buyer.

    Alex
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  • Good point Alex

    But there has to be a "desire" to be educated.

    Many products do well on this - learn a foreign language, learn how to play a musical instrument, learn how to build a house, restore a classic car etc. etc.


    Steve

    P.S. I have a "desire" to eat healthy foods - but the allure of Rita's Full English Breakfast in the local cafe completely knocks out my good diet "education."

    Costs of my education over 10 years around $300.00 (a lowly 30 bucks a year) buying books and magazines on "good eating" including greens juices, vitamins and weird and wonderful superfoods etc (sadly no upsells or repeat business to the makers).

    Cost to me reading Rita's handwritten blackboard with todays "specials" nothing - Rita paid about $10.00 for the board and chalk (and lots of money paid by me for delicious food, plenty of upsells and continued repeat business).


    P.P.S. I did I hear Schwartz say you can create desire but it's usually too expensive or extremely difficult - it's much easier to channel existing desire.

    As in - Steve, Rita is ready and waiting for you.
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  • Profile picture of the author AronParker
    I'd say "Cashvertising" by Drew Eric Whitman.

    or "The Ultimate Sales Letter" by Dan Kennedy
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    • Profile picture of the author HandsomeGenius
      Originally Posted by AronParker View Post

      "The Ultimate Sales Letter" by Dan Kennedy

      That would be my pick too. I don't understand why you'd only read one though.
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  • Way, way back Drew Eric Whitman did a course on cassette (at the time Dvd's hadn't been invented).

    "How to Create Power-Packed Ads, Brochures & Sales Letters that Make Money NOW!"

    It was good.

    I remember on one of the cassettes he said - there is one book you should try and get (back then it was "out of print" Drew had managed to get an original copy saying it was the best ever book on copywriting).

    Breakthrough Advertising by Eugene Schwartz.


    Steve
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  • Profile picture of the author Jared Kennedy
    could anyone tell me where i could get my hands on either of these books?
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    • Hellor Jared,

      Originally Posted by Jared Kennedy View Post

      could anyone tell me where i could get my hands on either of these books?
      Google the titles...

      ...results will reveal

      Cinchilla
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  • Hellor Edwin & Steve,

    I think I may have discovered why some folks state that Breakthrough Advertising is deep, dry and takes several reads to grasp what Schwartz wrote.

    We surround ourselves with writing persuasively, picture words, images, stories, testimonials and the sort.

    2 weeks ago my personal goal was to read "The Robert Collier Letter Book" from cover to cover. I whipped right through it.

    This past week I read through "Breakthrough Advertising" cover to cover. Can't say I whip through it. I found myself pulling through it.

    Collier's books is 466 pages. Schwartz's book is 236 pages.

    The difference?

    Collier's approach was to show his experience by what he wrote.

    Schwartz's approach was to look back on what others did.

    Collier's was more like an ad man's journal with samples.

    Schwarz's was more like curriculum.

    Coming away from both reads, opened a door to a market and how to tap into their industry.

    Both are great books and I'd recommend them both.

    Chincilla
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  • Profile picture of the author Bsmith7585
    I would go with Advertising Secrets of the Written Word. I'm currently reading it now and I'm enjoying it.

    I would also recommend The Boron Letters. That book was an awesome read and gave tremendous incite on copywriting.

    Best of luck to you!
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    • Profile picture of the author George Schwab
      Originally Posted by Bsmith7585 View Post

      I would go with Advertising Secrets of the Written Word. I'm currently reading it now and I'm enjoying it.

      I would also recommend The Boron Letters. That book was an awesome read and gave tremendous incite on copywriting.

      Best of luck to you!
      Sugarman is great, read that one, liked it a lot

      i'm not a copy writer, can i become one if i read:

      The Brilliance Breakthough - Eugene Schwartz

      Advertising Magic - Brian Keith Voiles

      heard these are the some of the best, except of course
      Halbert, Settle and Ted Nicholas
      Signature

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      • Hellor George,

        Originally Posted by George Schwab View Post

        Sugarman is great, read that one, liked it a lot

        i'm not a copy writer, can i become one if i read:

        The Brilliance Breakthough - Eugene Schwartz

        Advertising Magic - Brian Keith Voiles

        heard these are the some of the best, except of course
        Halbert, Settle and Ted Nicholas
        Brian's Advertising Magic came out in 1995 and is still a great copy writing course today. You will learn a lot. Do Note: Brian was writing copy for his magician gigs long before he knew what copywriting was. Then he got turned on to Halbert, Abraham, Harlan, and a bunch of other well known copywriters and really took the plunge into copy writing.

        As for The Brilliance Breakthough. By itself it is not a book about copy writing. But it is a work book, with hands on exercises, teaching the reader how to write using Picture Words and Connecting words. It doesn't focus on school grammar. The focus is how to write clearly and communicate with your reader, for them to remember what you wrote.

        Will a copy writer, novice or pro, benefit? Without a doubt. But so will an attorney, plumber, restaurant owner & so on. I have the publication. Next to my Elements of Style book, I'd say this resource is a close second.

        But then again...

        ...you already know this.

        Chinchilla
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  • Profile picture of the author George Schwab
    Interestingly NOBODY got back to me

    are these guys mentioned bigger than any WF copywriter?

    Apparently!
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  • Profile picture of the author SamNuku
    Dude the best way to improve copywriting is to do.... copywriting. Plain & simple all the greats say it.

    What i'd suggest is instead of just reading is to do what the best always recommend:

    Get the best ads & write them out by hand daily. Just 1 ad per day will make you a pro soon enough.

    I'm reminded of this as Ben Settle just sent out a $20 offer which has like 500 of the greatest ads ever.

    So my goal starting tomorrow is to write out 3 per week starting tomorrow.

    I hope this helps! Reading is great. Lilstening is too. So is studying. But action is always the key to improvement of any skill (and thats what copywriting is - a skill we must work on)
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  • Profile picture of the author George Schwab
    yeah man from Brisbane you are right - Amen! - lets do it.
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  • Profile picture of the author George Schwab
    Cheers, that was worth reading!
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  • Profile picture of the author yukon
    Banned
    Oh, The Places You'll Go! by Dr. Seuss is the number one graduation book/gift.

    Do you want to know why?

    Good, I'll tell you.

    It's not about you (the author), it's about the person reading the book/text.

    Now you know.
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    Hi
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