I Think I Entered a SpaceCraft!

by Intrepreneur 3 replies
It's been a long time since I've read a good thorough introduction to a book! A very long time, I think I have tended to skip the intro a lot of the time, but today I've read one from start to finish.

I've never heard this before, but while reading that one introduction I think I got a better idea about selling than from anything ever before.

I could always sell over the phone but not so much in text.

Then this one introduction in one book changes my whole perception.

What's the thoughts on introductions to books being like a salesletter and a pretty good outline to how it should be done?
#copywriting #entered #spacecraft
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  • Profile picture of the author Jo_Shua
    The back cover and introduction to books can be a great resource to learn from.

    Picture this:

    You are in a Barnes and Noble, and you are looking for a new book to take home.

    What do you do? Well, first you find the section of books that interest you, then, you start to look at covers... and pick up the ones that catch your eye.

    The books you do happen to pick up you first read the back cover, then, if that interests you -- you open the book.

    But, you only intend to read the first few pages: the introduction.

    The introduction is so well written and so captivating that it hooks you in... Before you know it, your girl friend is tugging on your shirt pleading for you to hurry up and come on.

    But, you are not done reading -- YOU CANNOT PUT IT DOWN.

    So, you buy it.

    Essentially, the back cover and introduction to books are no different than a black-hole... Gravity that is so strong, even the knowing copywriter cannot escape it's pull
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    • Profile picture of the author Revolves
      Originally Posted by Joshua Collins View Post

      ...You are in a Barnes and Noble, and you are looking for a new book to take home.

      What do you do? Well, first you find the section of books that interest you, then, you start to look at covers... and pick up the ones that catch your eye...
      That reminds me of Jay Abraham's video on using Amazon to find killer headlines in any niche. I guess we can even use offline bookstores for great ideas.

      I agree that introductions have that "pulling power". They often state who can benefit, why they can benefit, and what misconceptions the book uncovers (much like a sales letter). It includes all good things the book can do for you.

      The back cover is also similar, but it resembles more of those squeeze pages rather than a sales letter.

      Regards,
      Revolves.
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    • Profile picture of the author Intrepreneur
      Originally Posted by Joshua Collins View Post

      Essentially, the back cover and introduction to books are no different than a black-hole... Gravity that is so strong, even the knowing copywriter cannot escape it's pull
      That was my guess. My second guess is that books with a look inside sell better on Amazon than those that don't.

      I find it was an impressive learning curve for me, reading that one introduction. It probably couldn't have been a better choice either, with being an introduction to a book on NLP.

      I've never seen this mentioned in any copywriting books I've bought, nor did any of the 3 I personally bought and read, mention checking out the newspaper. It's got some fascinating headlines and ideas for one liners that pack a punch!
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      Started this stuff 2009. Time is what will teach you the skills you need.

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