Book: "Secrets of a Freelance Writer" -- How are the fees/rates he discusses in 1988 so high in 2017?

19 replies
Hi Everyone,

My name is Erik, and I'm a freelance copywriter with 9+ years in the business. This is my first post, and I look forward to being a part of the community!

I'm currently reading a book called "Secrets of a Freelance Writer: How to Make $100,000 a Year or More" by Robert W. Bly, the first edition of which was published in 1988. Despite the tacky name, it's actually full of good evergreen info.

One thing that baffles me, however, is the author's discussion of pricing. Just as an example, he claims that he charges a fixed amount of "$2,500 for a two-page sales letter," or "$700-$850 for a press release," "$750-$1000 for a 300-400 word web page" and only for copy alone. This book, mind you, was written 30 years ago.

These numbers are somewhere in the ballpark of 5-8x (if not more) the amount that I regularly quote said jobs, see said jobs quoted and have been asked to do said jobs for, and we're 30 years in the future. Logically, I should be charging MUCH more than what he was in the '80s given inflation.

Again, it's not that I'm under-pricing my work (I don't think?)--it seems as if the market value has depreciated significantly according to these figures.

Can anyone explain this before my head explodes?
#— #1988 #2017 #book #discusses #fees or rates #high
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  • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
    Erik, please don't take this the wrong way. Part of what you see is determined by what "league" you're playing in.

    If you're writing for Boardroom or Agora or the like, the fees Bly quotes are a bargain.

    If you're looking for clients on Fiverr or the like, you would be sky high even at 1/5 to 1/8 of what Bly quotes.

    I'm guessing that you fall somewhere in the middle.

    Couple that with foreign competition at the lower levels, and you see a race to the bottom with so-called professionals competing on price.

    Here's something I got from a recording of a Dan Kennedy seminar a few years ago that you might like...

    Dan was talking about his early career, and asked a mentor how to increase his fees. The mentor told Dan to think of the highest fee he could imagine charging, then quadruple it. The next step was to practice saying that fee out loud in front of a mirror until he could do it confidently, without hesitation and without flinching. The first time Kennedy tried it on a live prospect, all the prospect said was "okay, when can you start."

    Beyond that, all I can say is welcome to the forum...
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  • Profile picture of the author colmodwyer
    Check what edition you're reading. I assume those numbers have been updated since he has a quote for web pages.

    Also, as an Agora copywriter, those fees seem quite steep to me...

    $2,500 for 2 pages works out to about $40,000 for a full package. Getting that from Agora would be very wishful thinking for most copywriters. (I'm just talking upfront fees here, with royalties, the sky's the limit!).

    Bly does a lot of B2B writing, which is probably where that figure comes from. So to some huge bank or whatever, it might be a bargain.

    Cheers,
    Colm
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  • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
    I recently watched a replay of one of AWAI's webinars on pricing. The presenter showed a graphic of a three-tiered triangle.

    The top tier (the smallest, pointy end) he called the "rock stars", the guys and gals that get the top fees. Bly is one of those guys.

    The middle tier he called "the professionals", the folks making professional fees for professional work. He said this is where most working copywriters should be placing themselves, while perhaps aspiring to be rock stars.

    The bottom, and by far the largest, tier he called the "bottom feeders", those competing in the race to the bottom. You'll find a lot of these people competing on sites like Fiverr and the content mills, trying to survive on penny a word articles.

    Just like the music business, there are a handful (relatively) of musicians making the megabucks. Just below them are a large number of professional musicians making a good living.
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  • Profile picture of the author splitTest
    Originally Posted by Erik Neilson View Post

    Hi Everyone,

    My name is Erik, and I'm a freelance copywriter with 9+ years in the business. This is my first post, and I look forward to being a part of the community!

    I'm currently reading a book called "Secrets of a Freelance Writer: How to Make $100,000 a Year or More" by Robert W. Bly, the first edition of which was published in 1988. Despite the tacky name, it's actually full of good evergreen info.

    One thing that baffles me, however, is the author's discussion of pricing. Just as an example, he claims that he charges a fixed amount of "$2,500 for a two-page sales letter," or "$700-$850 for a press release," "$750-$1000 for a 300-400 word web page" and only for copy alone. This book, mind you, was written 30 years ago.

    These numbers are somewhere in the ballpark of 5-8x (if not more) the amount that I regularly quote said jobs, see said jobs quoted and have been asked to do said jobs for, and we're 30 years in the future. Logically, I should be charging MUCH more than what he was in the '80s given inflation.

    Again, it's not that I'm under-pricing my work (I don't think?)--it seems as if the market value has depreciated significantly according to these figures.

    Can anyone explain this before my head explodes?
    Keep in mind that if people want you to "buy into" writing as a career ... by buying their books or courses or magazines or whatever ... it's in their interest to convince you that you will be making scads and scads of cash. Whether it's Bob Bly or Writer's Digest, they're all going to paint the rosiest picture they can...

    While it's true that it depends on the "league" you're in, much like baseball, not everyone can play in the major leagues... Bly is probably the most recognizable name in copywriting today, so he's "major league"... He also has the corporate contacts that come with a long career... and he has specialized in technical copywriting for industry... Big corporations can afford to pay his rates with a shrug... and they're willing to pay big $$ for a writer who they know can handle technical stuff...

    No beginner is getting those rates... No freelancer is getting $850 for a 300-word webpage... (Maybe a renowned agency that's handling the whole production, graphics and all, might net that for copy... but not some freelancer the client just picked off the internet...).

    ... Still I would advise you to never "bottom feed"... That is, you should quote rates that will make clients think you're worthy of the work... That weird part of consumer psychology that makes people think something is worth more if it has a higher price weighs strongly on copywriting... So confidence goes far in this biz...
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    This is all about Money Tolerance.

    I've written extensively and made videos about this key limiting belief as it is so important.

    What you think of as "a lot of money" has a huge impact on your life. Where you live, who you hang around, what you think is attainable, what you'll charge, what you'll buy.

    And your money tolerance is NOT the same as everyone else's out there.

    Many decision makers at many businesses wouldn't hire a $100 press release writer. They would never hire a $500 sales letter copywriter. To them, and their money tolerance, there isn't enough CERTAINTY on display by the service provider at those price points. It shows that the seller doesn't believe much in themselves (to the buyer...this is all internal perception.)

    $2500 isn't much for a sales letter and it's not actually a big jump from $500 IN THE MINDS OF CUSTOMERS, either. $15K and $50K is where the jump really is.

    Your money tolerance has you wearing blinders. At any level. I have 'em at my level. They make it hard to see that better class of clientele. You have to put consistent effort into changing your money tolerance, changing that filter by which you see the world, what is "a lot of money." This is a habit. Money tolerance is a habit. A habitual filter. I've raised that money tolerance maybe 6 times over the past six years, and it has never been easy. You have to cut contact with the old level. You have to insist to yourself that the better class of customer is out there. Actually, they're right there, beside you...you've just been filtering them out. And once you start seeing them you'll kick yourself, "How could I not see that opportunity? It's been there all this time."

    People make the huge mistake of thinking how THEY think is how EVERYBODY ELSE thinks. Ain't true. But everyone wants to be right, and will defend their opinions to the death. Just remember this, if you take nothing else away from my post here: Most 'facts' are actually just opinions. We box ourselves into little prisons with our own thoughts every day. If you think of yourself as the janitor, you'll never approach the CEO to do a deal.

    PS Just remembered I interviewed Bob Bly...from a cold call to his house (I was annoyed with something he said lol).
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  • Profile picture of the author DABK
    I will put it another way, because I agree with John and Jason and the others, but think some people need extra help:
    Everything comes down to what you know about your skills, about what people think about your skills, about your professions, about what other people think of your profession.

    If you know that a sales letter is worth $500, you cannot charge much more. If you know that the guy you're trying to sell the letter knows that a sales letter is worth $600, you won't charge a lot more. If you know that a letter is worth $500-600 but some of your competitors charge $400 and you're in need of dough, you'll probably charge $300.

    If you know that your letters will make sales for whoever you're talking to and know that the going rate is $500, you'll charge $500. If you know your letters will outperform your competitors, you'll charge a bit more, depending on how much outperforming is involved and your knowledge of the value of such performance in the eye of the seller.

    Awkward way to say, the problem is what you know, what you're certain about.

    Unlearn some things, learn new things in their place... You'll either find out that the people you're now working with are able and willing to pay more for your pieces or you'll find, without trying too hard, people who are...

    Then you reach another plateau. As long as it's comfortable, you'll stay there. When it becomes uncomfortable, change what you know, what you're certain of.
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    • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
      Originally Posted by DABK View Post

      I will put it another way, because I agree with John and Jason and the others, but think some people need extra help:
      Everything comes down to what you know about your skills, about what people think about your skills, about your professions, about what other people think of your profession.

      If you know that a sales letter is worth $500, you cannot charge much more. If you know that the guy you're trying to sell the letter knows that a sales letter is worth $600, you won't charge a lot more. If you know that a letter is worth $500-600 but some of your competitors charge $400 and you're in need of dough, you'll probably charge $300.

      If you know that your letters will make sales for whoever you're talking to and know that the going rate is $500, you'll charge $500. If you know your letters will outperform your competitors, you'll charge a bit more, depending on how much outperforming is involved and your knowledge of the value of such performance in the eye of the seller.

      Awkward way to say, the problem is what you know, what you're certain about.

      Unlearn some things, learn new things in their place... You'll either find out that the people you're now working with are able and willing to pay more for your pieces or you'll find, without trying too hard, people who are...

      Then you reach another plateau. As long as it's comfortable, you'll stay there. When it becomes uncomfortable, change what you know, what you're certain of.
      I agree with what you say, the "I know this is true" thing.

      It's built on limiting beliefs and a lot of that is from what other people push at us. Money Tolerance is an "I know this is true" thing ("That's expensive." Compared to what?! And based on whose perspective?)

      What your prospect knows to be true is not the same thing you know to be true. But people are walking around believing everyone else believes the same things they do...or are broken versions of themselves.

      The main principle Elon Musk uses is to define what he "knows" to be true, and then try to bust that truth. Prove it wrong. That's how he gets where he is and accomplishes more than the rest of us.

      Fortunately, these goal posts can be moved deliberately. It takes effort because what is true is the result of our habits, upbringing, and a few key choices.

      If you're brought up in an affluent neighborhood, that's what you are used to and believe to be true. People have well kept lawns, nice late model vehicles, and are quiet.

      If your parents struggled with money and that's what you learned money was about, that's "the truth" for you.

      The problem comes from being unconscious about these beliefs and assuming everyone else is that way, too.
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      • Profile picture of the author SARubin
        Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

        I agree with what you say, the "I know this is true" thing.

        It's built on limiting beliefs and a lot of that is from what other people push at us. Money Tolerance is an "I know this is true" thing ("That's expensive." Compared to what?! And based on whose perspective?)

        What your prospect knows to be true is not the same thing you know to be true. But people are walking around believing everyone else believes the same things they do...or are broken versions of themselves.

        The main principle Elon Musk uses is to define what he "knows" to be true, and then try to bust that truth. Prove it wrong. That's how he gets where he is and accomplishes more than the rest of us.

        Fortunately, these goal posts can be moved deliberately. It takes effort because what is true is the result of our habits, upbringing, and a few key choices.

        If you're brought up in an affluent neighborhood, that's what you are used to and believe to be true. People have well kept lawns, nice late model vehicles, and are quiet.

        If your parents struggled with money and that's what you learned money was about, that's "the truth" for you.

        The problem comes from being unconscious about these beliefs and assuming everyone else is that way, too.
        Very insightful, Jason. I've also held a similar understanding for some time now.

        Just out of curiosity, how would you suggest people release their limiting beliefs, and move beyond them?

        I have my own thoughts (that have worked for me) But I'm just curious how a fellow traveler perceives it?
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        Started working on a new copywriters forum side project (because I got bored one day) It's a work in progress. We'll see how it goes (suggestions for improvements are welcome)

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        • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
          Originally Posted by SARubin View Post

          Very insightful, Jason. I've also held a similar understanding for some time now.

          Just out of curiosity, how would you suggest people release their limiting beliefs, and move beyond them?

          I have my own thoughts (that have worked for me) But I'm just curious how a fellow traveler perceives it?
          Written a lot and made videos about this topic over the past several years.

          Here's what I wrote at the end of last month for a guy in Coffee With Dan on FB:

          You're halfway to fixing the problem because a) you know about it, and having awareness means you can start to change it, and b) you've noticed the emotional reactions your beliefs about money are tied to. And therein lies the "secret" for making change happen.

          Your next step is to choose what emotions you DO want money to be associated with for you. Examples: excitement, ability to take action, abundance.

          We are not stuck with Pavlovian reactions. We can choose our reactions. The one you've had until now was an unconscious reaction installed by your mother since the time you were too young to do anything about it. That's not uncommon BTW. Your reactions, all of them, are habits and you know you can change a habit in, what, about 30 days of sustained effort.

          So here's what's going to happen: you're going to have that knee-jerk reaction to money the next time the subject comes up. But this time, you'll notice it. You'll remember you can DO something about it, change your reaction, before your brain and body go into unconscious autopilot and take you down into the pit you've gone in the previous times all these years.

          You stop yourself, literally say it out loud if you have to, "NO. I choose to feel happy, abundant, successful about money and my relationship with money." Think and say it over and over again until you begin to feel better. You can choose to feel any emotion at any time and are not at the whim of automatic reactions. So pump yourself full of positive feelings when you start thinking about money.

          Develop that habit, the one of thinking good things about money. Will you make mistakes? Will you fall into the knee-jerk reaction on occasion, and find yourself moping about the subject of money? Yes. But when you regain conscious knowledge of how you're feeling about money, you can go ahead and start changing that feeling again that instant.

          Our limiting beliefs work on us when they're in the shadows. When we're unconscious of them. You are already well on the road to becoming the person you want to be, the one with the reaction to money and how you feel about money that you desire. Now you need to identify the target of HOW you want to feel about it, and start practicing the adjustments until it becomes the new "unconscious competence' habit.

          Right now you're a success! You're unconsciously competent at reacting to money with this set of beliefs and emotions. It's straightforward to deliberately put new beliefs and emotions in their place to get the result you want.

          For fun, because being lighthearted about things can help, put the word "electricity" where "money" was in how you were talking about money above. "I grew up in a relatively poor household and learned that any time electricity was involved so was a world of negativity to include fear, anxiety, and anguish. This all came primarily from my single mother."

          Now substitute "roast beef" for "money." Read it through again. Out loud.

          And now "fish hooks."

          The purpose of doing this is not to make you feel silly, but to start disassociating your feelings and reactions from the topic of money. Money itself is an inert thing, just an idea, just a thought with hangers-on of other thoughts (the beliefs and feelings you've put on it like Christmas tree ornaments.) Keep doing this until you start to smile.

          Happy to provide more info by PM as they don't like direct linking in this group, but this is the core of what you'll get in a paid course and I'd rather see you helped under your own power rather than get in thrall to some "magic guru" (and build another set of dependency beliefs!).
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          • Profile picture of the author SARubin
            Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

            Happy to provide more info by PM as they don't like direct linking in this group, but this is the core of what you'll get in a paid course and I'd rather see you helped under your own power rather than get in thrall to some "magic guru" (and build another set of dependency beliefs!).
            Very interesting, and well thought out answer, Jason. I'm sure it will benefit many who read it.

            Although, I think you misunderstood the intent of my post. Which means I didn't word it properly, and I apologize for that. I was really just going for an exchange of ideas.

            I've already made great strides in changing my own beliefs about money, over the years.

            I too grew up in a household full of negative (limiting) beliefs about money, with old cliches' such as "money doesn't grow on trees" - and, "we can't afford this, or that."

            Those beliefs followed me through a good portion of my life. But I've consciously changed them over the past decade (or so)

            My own personal method of change revolves partly (primarily?) around the power of habits, and the mental / physical action of consciously changing habits, and beliefs, one at a time.

            Call it Kaizen, call it neuro-synapsis pattern manipulation, or simply call it creating new habits based on the theory of - cues... rituals...rewards?

            I think my own personal breakthrough with money came when I finally managed to disassociate (pretty much all) emotion from money. Now I see it as simply a method of value exchange, and I no longer get excited, or anxious at the thought of it.

            Now don't get me wrong here, if someone dropped $10,000,000 in my lap, I would likely go through a range of emotions from giddy, to suspicious, to euphoric (and who knows what else?)

            But then once I came back down to earth, I'd probably just buy myself a new outfit, or a new toy... spend a chunk of it on my family... donate a chunk of it to a worthy cause... and put the rest of it into an investment, or savings... and then carry on with my life.

            All that said, I still appreciate your response to my inquiry. It did provide me with some value (mostly in the form of idea exchange) and I'm sure it will benefit many others who read it here.

            All the best,
            SAR
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            Started working on a new copywriters forum side project (because I got bored one day) It's a work in progress. We'll see how it goes (suggestions for improvements are welcome)

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  • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
    Or, to go with the short version...

    It isn't what you don't know that holds you back. It's the things you know to be true that are not true that get you in trouble.
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  • Profile picture of the author laurencewins
    I concur with Jason, John and others here.
    If you have a product called X and you believe it's worth $40, that's what you'll charge ( or perhaps a little more, hoping to attract more people.
    If your thinking stronger than this, your product might be worth $80 but it depends on how much your traffic believes it's worth.

    If, on the higher end, you have the same product and you have placed a $200+ price tag on it, you may throw an extravagant party to help make you plenty of sales despite the incident that just happened. Obviously you'll have hidden the product in a place where it won't be found.

    So there you have it. 3 options but they depend on meticulous planning, including getting safely away without being recognised. What's stopping you???
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    Cheers, Laurence. Writer/Editor/Proofreader.
    Website / Blog for more info.

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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    I'll give an example of pricing from my own experience. Sales On Fire was my sales training WSO and I launched it in January 2012. At first the price was $27 for a call with me. I got a stupid number of takers and basically stayed in my house for a month doing calls from 8:30AM - 11PM. Hurt my voice.

    Then I recorded it, so I wouldn't have to keep performing the content, and made it into a lousy-looking simple password-protected website. I charged $37 for that. It sold. Then I raised the price to $57. Kept selling. April 2012 I made more than my salary as a senior manager at an Inc. Top 1000 firm with $57 sales...tax refund money, I guess. Then I raised it to $87. Sold just fine.

    $97.

    Stopped selling.

    "What the heck?" I thought. "I must have hit the top of the price elasticity." This was early summer 2012.

    A fellow Warrior who ran a separate sales forum decided to be an affiliate. We tried a $197 price tag to make sure we were both fairly compensated. Meh, one or two sales.

    At this point I redesigned the offer a little. How about the buyer gets a live call with me...and then gets the recording of that, plus the website videos and audios? I put a $297 price tag on it.

    That offer sold and kept selling, including a price rise to $497 at the end, until I shut it down years later. Sometimes I'd get six orders a week. I reinvested profits into turning the program into a membership site...later three pretty membership sites...and customers got all that in addition to the live call with me.

    Notice how much more it was than the original price. Wasn't like I was doing a whole lot more work.

    Why did people eagerly buy at $297 but not $97? Or $197? Shouldn't they have bought more at the lower price?

    The reason they didn't is the low price = higher sales volume idea is a fallacy. It's wrong.

    There's a point in the buyer's mind where "It costs that much so it must be good. I'm comfortable with that, it makes me feel comfortable, so I'll buy it."

    If I cared, I might try even more pricing experiments here...but I feel the market has moved on.

    What YOU think and value isn't what your BUYER thinks and values.

    What YOU think is a "high" price for an article or sales letter may well be "low" for your individual buyer. We have a saying for this in sales training: leave your beliefs in the car.
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  • Profile picture of the author marciayudkin
    But people are walking around believing everyone else believes the same things they do...or are broken versions of themselves.
    You are so right, and I see this problem in operation every single working day in people's marketing copy - assuming that everyone thinks the way they do, knows what they know, has the gadgets they have, values the goals that they cherish, etc.

    Even if in the rare case you happen to be right that you are thinking the same way and on the same lifestyle wavelength as your target audience, you can raise the effectiveness of your marketing copy dramatically by reminding yourself not to take this similarity for granted and to bring it out in the text.

    Hope that makes sense! It's a cornerstone of the work I do.

    Marcia Yudkin
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    Check out Marcia Yudkin's No-Hype Marketing Academy for courses on copywriting, publicity, infomarketing, marketing plans, naming, and branding - not to mention the popular "Marketing for Introverts" course.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    This is what you asked: "Just out of curiosity, how would you suggest people release their limiting beliefs, and move beyond them?"

    That's what I answered. I went and looked up, copied and pasted my answer from the CWD group (still took me 10 minutes to find). So that is the group I was referring to if that is the cause of confusion.

    If you wanted to know my thoughts about something else, what is that?
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    • Profile picture of the author SARubin
      Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

      This is what you asked: "Just out of curiosity, how would you suggest people release their limiting beliefs, and move beyond them?"

      That's what I answered. I went and looked up, copied and pasted my answer from the CWD group (still took me 10 minutes to find). So that is the group I was referring to if that is the cause of confusion.

      If you wanted to know my thoughts about something else, what is that?
      My mistake (sorry) I must have misinterpreted the last part of your post.

      I was reading your post, and thought it was pretty interesting and well written. (I especially enjoyed the chuckle I got with the "roast beef" and "fish hooks" part) And I was with you right up until I started reading the last paragraph, which began...

      Originally Posted by Jason Kanigan View Post

      Happy to provide more info by PM as they don't like direct linking in this group, but this is the core of what you'll get in a paid course
      I guess you were just trying to be helpful? But, I thought it sounded like the beginning of a sales pitch. (maybe I've just heard too many sales pitches lately, and anything that even remotely resembles one, starts to sound like one?) I suppose at 6:30 am EST, I just read into it something that wasn't there?

      Anyway, that's why I replied the way I did. Just wanted to let you know that while I enjoyed reading it, and absorbing the ideas, I'm probably not your ideal target market.

      But the info you wrote, was still pretty cool to read. Thanks for that.


      All the best,
      SAR
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      Started working on a new copywriters forum side project (because I got bored one day) It's a work in progress. We'll see how it goes (suggestions for improvements are welcome)

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      • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
        Originally Posted by SARubin View Post

        My mistake (sorry) I must have misinterpreted the last part of your post.

        I was reading your post, and thought it was pretty interesting and well written. (I especially enjoyed the chuckle I got with the "roast beef" and "fish hooks" part) And I was with you right up until I started reading the last paragraph, which began...



        I guess you were just trying to be helpful? But, I thought it sounded like the beginning of a sales pitch. (maybe I've just heard too many sales pitches lately, and anything that even remotely resembles one, starts to sound like one?) I suppose at 6:30 am EST, I just read into it something that wasn't there?

        Anyway, that's why I replied the way I did. Just wanted to let you know that while I enjoyed reading it, and absorbing the ideas, I'm probably not your ideal target market.

        But the info you wrote, was still pretty cool to read. Thanks for that.


        All the best,
        SAR
        I have a bunch of blog posts and videos on the topic. Several people took me up on the offer and I gave them maybe six things to look at in PM. I don't have a program to offer on this offer so nothing to sell or buy.
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  • Profile picture of the author ryanbiddulph
    Hi Erik,

    Good to see you here.

    Love John's take.

    It is all a matter of clarity. Namely, the clarity of the individual charging the rates.

    Example; 2 years ago I recall helping a coaching client. He asked how much he owed me. I told him $15. Not kidding. He sent me $25 and told me to buy a few extra beers with it. I lacked clarity in the coaching area. Felt I was not good enough or experienced enough. So I charged $15 for an hour of my time, even though I made a ton more through different channels.

    Now I charge $200 per hour. More people have hired me at $200 per hour than $15. Because I got clear on my experience, value, the price being charged and also, my comfort with receiving money.

    Ditto for my course. I charged $30 for it 2 years ago. Now I charge $350 and have sold more than selling it at $30.

    This is so tough to get at first when running ideas solely through the mind - which likes to analyze, dissect, test, etc, etc - but when you get your energy right, meaning, losing virtually all fear around charging a certain price aka getting super clear on your pricing, folks will gradually reflect your clarity back to you.

    Of course, this clarity usually comes with experience, tons of practice and persistence, but you need to get your energy right, no matter what, to raise rates and also, to actually receive the money at your new rates.

    Ryan
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    Ryan Biddulph, Blogger, Author, World Traveling Digital Nomad
    If you want to become a full time blogger you can buy my eBook here
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  • [QUOTE=Erik Neilson;11165415.
    Can anyone explain this before my head explodes?[/QUOTE]

    You want I write in English ... or frickin' garbage?

    Truth is, all kindsa impossibly talented non-writer types would love for their entreprenoorial shit JUS' TO BE WRITTEN OUT THE WAY I THINKS IT ALL UP SO CRYSTAL CLEAR TO ME, YANNO?

    Prolly there is a market out there for paraphrasin' deloosional imbeciles, I dunno.

    I would wanna bypass that Nirvana Tossi an' go make shit up.

    So ... You Skimmed This Entire Thread, Simply In Order To Evidence Your DISRUPTIVE SMARTASS Credentials?

    Actshwlly, I wanna pee -- but I am tryin' to be helpful here.
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    Lightin' fuses is for blowin' stuff together.

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