Here's Why Most Ads Are Almost Always Busts And Why Some Of Them Are Always Home Runs!

11 replies
You have heard that we humans buy based on emotions and then we justify by logic...but, why is that?

Here's the answer...

Neuroscientists have proven for decades that instead of one main brain, we "actually" have 3 brains instead. Which they call the "Triune Brain Theory"

Which consists of

The Neocortex - the "logical" brain, the youngest and weakest part of our brain, when comes to making the decision.

The Limbic brain - the "emotional" brain.

The Reptilian brain - the "old" brain, responsible for our survival instincts and also the most powerful brain when comes to making the decision.

So why do the Reptilian brain is so important?

Because all the information we perceive, at first, goes through the Reptilian brain, which means it will be perceived from the emotional and instinctive point of view!

So then, where's the problem?

The problem is that a lot of times, the advertisement will try to sell people to their "logical" brain - the Neocortex. Not on their emotions.

For example:

You probably have seen those car dealership ads on TV...
What is their "typical" angle?

"Come see us, we have a Fall sale! 50% off on every car!"
or
"Come check it out the new Ford Mustang model with XYZ features, only $xx, xxx!"

So the first problem is that pretty much everybody else is using the same marketing approach, so there's nothing that "uniquely" stands out...but that's another subject.

Also, it's selling to our logic, not our emotions...

So instead would more effective if your ad would sound like this:

"Would you trade $xx xxx to be the guy who "steals" all the girls with the new Ford Mustang by your side?"

You see...It speaks directly to buyer's emotions and also, it speaks directly to the type of person who would buy this kind of car.

So let's break down both ads.

1) "Come check it out the new Ford Mustang model with XYZ features, only $xx, xxx!"

What's the survival instinct it speaks to: really not anything...

What's the emotional reason to buy: could be the sense of feeling "cool" or keep up with trends, but it's not mentioned!

2) "Would you trade $xx xxx to be the guy who "steals" all the girls with the new Ford Mustang by your side?"

What's the survival instinct it speaks to: I will be socially approved!

What's the emotional reason to buy: I will be the "slick" dude!

So you see the difference?

The takeaway...

Really try to appeal to the emotional reasons who truly drive our decisions!
#ads #busts #home #runs
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  • Profile picture of the author Ged3
    You have made some very good points there.


    I think a lot of advertisers do try and appeal to our emotions.


    They realise that we will often buy something on an impulse rather than something that we need.


    Best Regards
    Ged
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  • Profile picture of the author Bella Lopez
    That's some great advice. I'll definitely apply it to my upcoming posts and share the result difference on this thread.

    Thank you!
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  • Profile picture of the author helisell
    Sorry but this is just some random information
    extracted from some book or other.

    Anyone who writes copy and doesn't already know this
    has a pretty serious problem.

    Ist post and producing this? Really?
    Signature

    Making Calls To Sell Something? What are you actually saying?
    Is there any room for improvement? Want to find out?

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    • Profile picture of the author DABK
      This is OP's 1st post. 'Nuff said, no?

      Originally Posted by helisell View Post

      Sorry but this is just some random information
      extracted from some book or other.

      Anyone who writes copy and doesn't already know this
      has a pretty serious problem.

      Ist post and producing this? Really?
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  • tbh I am so relieved 'bout the 3 brains deal.
    Signature

    Lightin' fuses is for blowin' stuff together.

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  • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
    Going the other way (only an emotional appeal) doesn't work either.

    Remember, "people buy with emotion and justify with logic"?

    You may get their attention with the emotional appeal, but if you skip the logic, they won't pull the trigger.

    Speaking of car ads, Range Rover had one that illustrates this.

    Opening shot: Little girl wearing shorts, tee shirt and a wool cap is turning a cactus into a "snow man."

    Parents see this. They load the little girl into their new RR and drive all night to a cabin with snow. Little girl build her snowman, grins, and runs inside.

    I'm sorry, but I'm not going to buy a $60k SUV so my kid can build a snowman.

    Infiniti has one that drives me nuts.

    The husband is sent to fetch food for a holiday dinner. He keeps deliberately screwing up so he can jump in the car and drive back to town. This repeats a few times, until the wife leaves in mid-sentence for her turn. All this tells me is that anyone who buys an Infiniti has some kind of brain damage.

    Am I missing something here?
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

      Going the other way (only an emotional appeal) doesn't work either.

      Remember, "people buy with emotion and justify with logic"?

      You may get their attention with the emotional appeal, but if you skip the logic, they won't pull the trigger.

      Speaking of car ads, Range Rover had one that illustrates this.

      Opening shot: Little girl wearing shorts, tee shirt and a wool cap is turning a cactus into a "snow man."

      Parents see this. They load the little girl into their new RR and drive all night to a cabin with snow. Little girl build her snowman, grins, and runs inside.

      I'm sorry, but I'm not going to buy a $60k SUV so my kid can build a snowman.

      Infiniti has one that drives me nuts.

      The husband is sent to fetch food for a holiday dinner. He keeps deliberately screwing up so he can jump in the car and drive back to town. This repeats a few times, until the wife leaves in mid-sentence for her turn. All this tells me is that anyone who buys an Infiniti has some kind of brain damage.

      Am I missing something here?
      Yes. Institutional ads are different from direct response ads. They are designed to evoke feelings, so that the local ads can appeal to logic (roughly speaking)

      The Range Rover ad is very specific to Christmas and is designed to inject a "RR will get my family to love me more because the RR delivers them to a fantasy winter hid-a-way" subconscious feeling. Don't you want your kids to hug you like that girl hugs her father? Apparently, if you get a RR...you'll be more loved, and trendier, and more with it.

      And the Infiniti one is easier. It shows (in a slice of life segment) that thin, attractive, wealthy people of indeterminate race find driving the Infiniti fun. Do you want to have fun while driving? Drive an Infiniti.

      Again, these aren't meant to sell cars, but to give you a subconscious emotional feeling when you see the local ads.
      And these are the kind of ads you have to see over and over again to make an impression on your temporal lobes.

      Notice all the people in these ads are beautiful? Young? Sexy? Wealthy looking? Don't you want to be like them?

      A related example. A friend of mine that sells life insurance has multiple billboards in town. Just his face and something like "What the world needs now is love sweet love...and more life insurance"...and his name.

      I thought I knew the answer before I asked him, but I asked how these billboard signs sold life insurance. He said that he never gets calls from the ads, but it's far easier for him to get in the door, because he's considered a very minor local celebrity...and his billboards make you smile....so he gets doors more easily opened, and quicker rapport.

      And amazingly, he never thought that billboard advertising was direct response advertising.
      In fact, I think he just thought it would be neat to have his face on billboards. But after the fact, he figured out the benefit.
      Anyway, it's a theory.

      The one I like is (No idea the make or model) where the guys says "Driving matters"...like it really does. Of course, it's meaningless. But if you say something meaningless...but say it with meaning...it has meaning to you.

      And so...Driving matters.
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      • Profile picture of the author JayKay Dowdall
        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post


        The one I like is (No idea the make or model) where the guys says "Driving matters"...like it really does. Of course, it's meaningless. But if you say something meaningless...but say it with meaning...it has meaning to you.

        And so...Driving matters.
        Zoom Zoom
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  • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
    Originally Posted by Direct Response Rebel View Post

    Here's Why Most Ads Are Almost Always Busts And Why Some Of Them Are Always Home Runs!
    Mixed metaphor alert!

    Alex
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  • Profile picture of the author copywriterpros
    Lot of things to learn from you. Thank you for the great post! Now I start thinking about "Triune Brain Theory" and how much we actually do not know about ourselves.
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