Best Course to Practice Copywriting?

32 replies
Hello all,

I just finished an online copywriting course through my local university. In the past 8 weeks, I've done the following:

- Translated features into benefits for a banana

- Created customer personas and wrote a sales letter for a hypothetical e-book

- Wrote a creative brief for Awake Chocolate

- Wrote two hypothetical bus shelter ads for Starbucks and Tim Hortons

- Rewrote an 'about page' for a local moving company

Now obviously, my portfolio is still very thin, so I am wanting to take another course that will force me to write more and allow me to expand my portfolio. I heard that the AWAI Accelerated Program for Six-Figure Copywriting is a great course with plenty of practical exercises, so I am planning on purchasing that next.

Just wanted to hear your guys' thoughts.

Money is not an issue for me, as my parents are willing to pay.

I know that there is already a post on here about the best copywriting courses (https://www.warriorforum.com/copywri...ng-course.html), but I want one that places more emphasis on writing, rather than reading.

I've already read Bob Bly's The Copywriter's Handbook, and am halfway through Peter Bowerman's The Well-Fed Writer, so I really am just itching to write.
#copywriting #practice
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  • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
    The AWAI program is excellent.

    But if you are itching to write, then write.

    Get yourself an affiliate account with a company in a niche in which you have an interest. Create reviews, sales pages, landing pages, emails, etc. and send traffic to them. Nothing will prepare you for the real world like the real world.

    One of the AWAI instructors, Nick Usborne, has a site called CoffeeDetective.com. Start on a blog like this, and practice your skills in addition to taking the Accelerated Program.
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    • Profile picture of the author darrenli32
      Hi thanks for the reply John. I will be purchasing the AWAI program shortly. Someone I was messaging online mentioned that you can submit your completed assignments to AWAI for feedback and that you can also ultimately take on a live assignment. In addition, you can get access to their online job board once you complete the course, so I am very excited.

      Regarding website creation, I actually have already created a rehabilitative fitness blog just for fun (as part of a wordpress course that I'm taking at my local college). However, I believe that it is a bit too niche, as the whole blog is dedicated to a problem that took me years to fix (glute inactivity).

      So far, I only have two blog posts and a sales letter for a hypothetical e-book relating to the topic. I wouldn't mind expanding the site, but I'm not sure how I would go about making money from it. Like I could finish writing the e-book and then try to drive people to the sales page to buy it, and I could try selling a few pieces of gym accessories through amazon affiliate links, but I personally think the topic is too niche to write endless blog posts on.

      The only other idea I have is to create a hockey goalie equipment review blog, as I love the game and have been playing for almost 10 years. However, goalie equipment is expensive to buy, so I don't have a lot, and I'm not sure how I would become an affiliate for the big brand names such as CCM, Bauer, and Warrior.

      Regardless of the money making potential, playing around on wordpress has given me insight into website creation (and how simple it can be). Once my copywriting portfolio is dense enough, I can create a business website to display it on.
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  • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
    Not trying to be a smart-alec, but is "glute inactivity" anything like too much time sitting on your butt, with the attendant back problems and muscle loss?

    As far as being too niche, think about what happens when you throw a pebble into a pond. You end up with a series of expanding concentric rings. Many niche sites start out like yours, focused on one very specific problem. What you've learned about rehabilitative fitnes can also be applied to conditions beyond glute inactivity, can't they?

    Besides, at this point, that website you are building will be another sample for your portfolio. It will show potential clients that you are capable of communicating clearly and persuasively.

    And, as you'll learn, the health market, with it's huge number of niches, pays very well and has a lot of potential clients. Most copywriters only need a small number of steady clients to make an excellent income.
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    • Profile picture of the author darrenli32
      Yes, glute inactivity can stem from too much time sitting, but it can also be a result of injuries or bodily asymmetries (such as a shorter left leg).

      Most glute activation advice on the internet suggests isolation exercises, such as clamshells and hip thrusts, but these exercises are futile if the opposing muscles are tight. That's why my blog places a huge emphasis on stretching and releasing your muscles before going into activation exercises.

      Thanks for all your advice so far. I'll keep writing on my blog, while working through the AWAI program.
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  • Profile picture of the author affmarketer101
    You can go to Udemy and search for many copywriting courses at reasonable price. The best copywriting course I've known is "Direct Response Copywriting Course by Pam Foster". Just google it, you can easily find it. It's created by Digitalmarketer - if you take the course, you can earn a certificate too.
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    • Profile picture of the author 1Bryan
      So ...

      Benefits of a banana, eh?

      Lol.

      Do this:

      Get a P/T sales gig. Face-to-face. Commission + base. You'll learn more in 8 weeks of that than any course.

      Why?

      Clients don't hire copywriters to buy "writing."

      They hire copywriters for more SALES.

      Copywriting is a sales gig. Not a writing gig.

      It's taking the sales process and putting it into mediums (which can include text) so that more eyeballs see it.

      But it ain't about being a "writer" ...

      It's about SELLING.

      If you focus on that - SALES - you'll not only get better faster. You'll make more money. Content writers pretending to be "copywriters" don't make much in the grand scheme of things.

      P.S. Read up on diploma mills. That's what all these "courses" and "certificates" are. Worthless.
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      • Profile picture of the author darrenli32
        I've struggled immensely with the few face-to-face sales jobs that I've tried... Does this mean that I'm unfit to be a copywriter?

        I would say "no," because according to Peter Bowerman, "success as a freelance commercial writer is far more about a process than a personality. It's far more about a lot of things you have to do, than some way you have to be."

        Also, face-to-face sales is a lot different than written sales. When you're talking to people face-to-face, there are a lot of nonverbal nuisances you must be wary of, such as voice tone, body language, and eye contact.

        But when you're writing, you can convey, for example, confidence, even if you're a shy, inhibited person in real life. You just have to use the right words and sentence structure in order to convey the tone that you're going for.

        You also have time to think of everything and to structure your main points in a coherent, persuasive way. Face-to-face sales you must think of everything on the spot. Not good for natural introverts like me, who have always struggled to master social calibration.

        Anyways, what face-to-face sales jobs have I done? Let's take a look:

        1. Knife seller

        On our first day, our boss got us to write down the names of 100 people that we knew (or hardly knew). We would then try to contact these people using whatever means necessary, in order to set up an appointment in their homes. So I would be walking up to peoples' doors with a big, black bag full of knives, fruits, and vegetables. I'd spend a bunch of time building rapport and demonstrating the products, before going for the close.

        It was an extremely challenging job, but it really helped me to improve my social skills. I sold some knives, but I was doing so bad at one point that my boss had to take away my base pay in order to motivate me more. We operated on a referral program, so absolutely no cold-calling. I eventually ran out of leads and ended up quitting after that summer.

        2. Door-to-door sales for a painting company

        Walked door-to-door asking people if they would like a free estimate on any painting work that needed to be done. Most people said no. I got fired after a few weeks.

        3. Street fundraiser

        Stood on the street trying to talk to random people. The goal was to get them to sign up as monthly donors for child sponsorships. Pure emotional brainwash. I was successful some days, but eventually got fired for not hitting the sales targets.
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        • Profile picture of the author 1Bryan
          Originally Posted by darrenli32 View Post

          I've struggled immensely with the few face-to-face sales jobs that I've tried... Does this mean that I'm unfit to be a copywriter?

          I would say "no," because according to Peter Bowerman, "success as a freelance commercial writer is far more about a process than a personality. It's far more about a lot of things you have to do, than some way you have to be."

          Also, face-to-face sales is a lot different than written sales. When you're talking to people face-to-face, there are a lot of nonverbal nuisances you must be wary of, such as voice tone, body language, and eye contact.

          But when you're writing, you can convey, for example, confidence, even if you're a shy, inhibited person in real life. You just have to use the right words and sentence structure in order to convey the tone that you're going for.

          You also have time to think of everything and to structure your main points in a coherent, persuasive way. Face-to-face sales you must think of everything on the spot. Not good for natural introverts like me, who have always struggled to master social calibration.

          Anyways, what face-to-face sales jobs have I done? Let's take a look:

          1. Knife seller

          On our first day, our boss got us to write down the names of 100 people that we knew (or hardly knew). We would then try to contact these people using whatever means necessary, in order to set up an appointment to go to their house to demonstrate these knives. So I would be walking up to peoples' doors with a big, black bag full of knives, fruits, and vegetables. I'd spend a bunch of time building rapport and demonstrating the products, before going for the close.

          It was an extremely challenging job, but it really helped me to improve my social skills. I sold some knives, but I was doing so bad at one point that my boss had to take away my base pay in order to motivate me more. We operated on a referral program, so absolutely no cold-calling. I eventually ran out of leads and ended up quitting after that summer.

          2. Door-to-door sales for a painting company

          Walked door-to-door asking people if they would like a free estimate on any painting work that needed to be done. Most people said no. I got fired after a few weeks.

          3. Street fundraiser

          Stood on the street trying to talk to random people. The goal was to get them to sign up as monthly donors for child sponsorships. Pure emotional brainwash. I was successful some days, but eventually got fired for not hitting the sales targets.
          You didn't learn you couldn't sell from those 3 experiences. You learned you couldn't sell junk.

          Congratulations.

          Neither can I.

          It means you have a conscience.

          Were the knives Cutco?

          I couldn't sell those. Not even to my family.

          I'm not trying to discourage you from being a copywriter. What happens to most is they get lost in this "safe" idea that they can be a copywriter without ever really having to sell.

          What happens?

          They wind up writing on freelance forums, if they are lucky. Otherwise, they just never realize the aspiration of being a copywriter.

          And not everyone is meant to sell. You can write informational stuff and still get paid well.

          But you are still going to have to sell yourself to get those gigs.

          P.S. Bowerman has sales chops. He pounded phones hard. Watch him on video. He's a salesman.

          P.P.S. Written and face-to-face sales aren't much different. That's why it is sales in print. Or sales multiplied.
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          • Profile picture of the author darrenli32
            Yes, they were Cutco.

            And yes, I know that when my portfolio is developed, I'll have to market myself a lot.

            In his chapter on cold calling, Bowerman says that he made 1000 calls in two months when he was first starting out. That's 25 calls a day.

            In regards to selling with words, I feel like if I keep reading and writing, then I can improve.

            And not everyone is meant to sell. You can write informational stuff and still get paid well.
            How can you make $ from writing informatively? Are you talking about content writing?
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            • Profile picture of the author 1Bryan
              Originally Posted by darrenli32 View Post

              Yes, they were Cutco.

              And yes, I know that when my portfolio is developed, I'll have to market myself a lot.

              In his chapter on cold calling, Bowerman says that he made 1000 calls in two months when he was first starting out. That's 25 calls a day.

              In regards to selling with words, I feel like if I keep reading and writing, then I can improve.

              How can you make $ from writing informatively? Are you talking about content writing?
              Bowerman has it in there. Whitepapers, brochures, internal documents, etc.

              Be careful about using the word "content" because it has a catch-all vibe to it.

              Businesses that pay well - usually they aren't going to refer to a white paper as "content."

              Knowing the language is important.

              Make them calls ... get into action.

              This forum used to be more active. And there were a lot of "hopeful" copywriters who'd talk about studying copywriting for 2 years.

              And in that time they had ZERO clients.

              All they were doing was reading and fantasizing about being a copywriter.

              Don't be that.

              P.S. Calls ... use the momentum. Make one call. If you still have momentum? Make a 2nd. It's the inertia ... you have to deal with that more than anything. If you call the right businesses? They will be happy to hear from you. Because they need writing.

              It ain't even in the same league as selling Cutco knives, lol

              P.P.S. I had no portfolio when I started. That's also the point. It's about starting. Not waiting to start.
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              • Profile picture of the author darrenli32
                P.P.S. I had no portfolio when I started. That's also the point. It's about starting. Not waiting to start.
                How did you get jobs if you had no work to show?
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                • Profile picture of the author 1Bryan
                  Originally Posted by darrenli32 View Post

                  How do you get jobs if you have no work to show?
                  How do you show work if you have no jobs?

                  Chicken or the egg.

                  P.S. Make samples. Use it as a security blanket so you feel more comfortable calling. You'll find that most never ask for samples.
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                  • Profile picture of the author darrenli32
                    I only have those 5 samples listed above, along with 2 blog posts and a short sales letter for a hypothetical e-book.
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                  • 1Bryan,

                    you are the man!

                    darrenli32

                    I hope you launched that course... GO all in and don't hold back.

                    Screw those thoughts that tell you everything has to be perfect.

                    You just have to give it your ALL and you'll feel good if you tried your 110%.


                    This conversation was so intense and awesome to read thanks guys.
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      • Profile picture of the author Proofread
        Love this reply.
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  • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
    Originally Posted by affmarketer101 View Post

    You can go to Udemy and search for many copywriting courses at reasonable price. The best copywriting course I've known is "Direct Response Copywriting Course by Pam Foster". Just google it, you can easily find it. It's created by Digitalmarketer - if you take the course, you can earn a certificate too.
    I'm familiar with Pam Foster. Total pro, seen several webinars with her.

    Originally Posted by 1Bryan View Post

    So ...

    Benefits of a banana, eh?

    Lol.

    Do this:

    Get a P/T sales gig. Face-to-face. Commission + base. You'll learn more in 8 weeks of that than any course.

    Why?

    Clients don't hire copywriters to buy "writing."

    They hire copywriters for more SALES.

    Copywriting is a sales gig. Not a writing gig.

    It's taking the sales process and putting it into mediums (which can include text) so that more eyeballs see it.

    But it ain't about being a "writer" ...

    It's about SELLING.

    If you focus on that - SALES - you'll not only get better faster. You'll make more money. Content writers pretending to be "copywriters" don't make much in the grand scheme of things.

    P.S. Read up on diploma mills. That's what all these "courses" and "certificates" are. Worthless.
    He's right, right up until the PS, where he doesn't know what he's talking about. He's spouting the same kind of anti-education nonsense that comes up when someone mentions taking courses or classes to learn something.

    Yes, there are diploma mills for copywriters, just like there are for doctors. Doesn't mean that any entity offering a structured course is "worthless."

    Copywriting has often been defined as "salesmanship in print." If you're trying to sell fruit to a nutrition company, being able to describe the benefits of your bananas over those of other providers is a useful skill. In fact, pretty much the whole organic foods industry is built on this.

    Even the P/T gig can be an exercise in frustration if you have no base to start from. If you have no clue about sales, being handed a nametag and an order book is more likely to lead to failure than learning, or learning the wrong things (like telling a customer anything they want to hear just to make the sale).
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    • Profile picture of the author 1Bryan
      Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post


      He's right, right up until the PS, where he doesn't know what he's talking about. .
      Please explain how I don't know what I am talking about. Tell me how an unaccredited certificate holds value.
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  • May I slooshie in here on a Chicken or Egg ticket & re-energize the seeds we got flowin' outta the original question like an unpeeled banana?

    Gonna lose best straight out cos it is kinda lame.

    That leaves ...

    course

    practice

    &

    copywritin'

    --
    an' I would wanna suggest that is the right order for arrangin' out this baby.

    Course is life's inevitable flow -- forever mixin' out intake an' output, like we breathe ... till we die.

    So ... gotta learn stuff ... then go apply.

    Practice says we gonna klutz out maxo cos we not frickin' Gods.

    On the basis inertia ain't no solution, you gotta max out here on how SUCCEEDIN' AS A NON-IMMORTAL means pitchin' in fulla heart with top skills you got.

    Copywritin' factors in how other people might want u direct 'em sumplace smart gonna tip all chicken & egg conundrums productively in their favor.

    That is why sumdays u on intake -- confused offaya tits 'bout infodump central knockin' outya smarts an' droppin' copywritin' kudos way off in the distance.

    But thenya evidence pull on cyclic happnincraft & lure from outta seemin' noplace an output.

    I overhyperbole here to proffer self-perpetuatin' SUCCESS imagry.

    Cos nowan can ever output forever on a self-generatin' whim.

    Point is, you gotta take heart in whatchyoo got & submit its potential exotica to the test.

    You on a course to practice copywritin', right?
    Signature

    Lightin' fuses is for blowin' stuff together.

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  • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
    Originally Posted by 1Bryan View Post

    Please explain how I don't know what I am talking about. Tell me how an unaccredited certificate holds value.
    Depends on who issued that unaccredited certificate and who is judging it. I'm not aware of any official accreditation for the AWAI program being discussed here, but some heavy hitters, like Agora and Stansberry Research to mention a couple, give the successful completion of the Accelerated Program weight when hiring writers.

    On the other hand, a Udemi course by a total unknown would carry very little weight.

    I didn't, and don't, deny that there are many certification programs which are worthless. My comment was based on the seeming assertion that any program not sanctioned with an official accreditation was part of a "diploma mill."

    No personal affront was intended.

    Originally Posted by darrenli32 View Post

    I only have those 5 samples listed above, along with 2 blog posts and a short sales letter for a hypothetical e-book.
    You want more samples and you are itching to write? Write some samples for yourself. Figure out what kind of writing you want to do (sales letters, landing pages, email series, whatever) and start writing.

    That's a benefit of having a blog project on the side, whether you make big bucks with it or not. Between your professional site and your blog, you have samples that will be used to judge what you can produce.

    You can do spec assignments for AWAI and some of the folks they refer to. Even if the client says no, you label that as "Spec" and put it with your samples.
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  • Profile picture of the author Nour Haba
    Check out creative circus or Miami Ad School
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    • Profile picture of the author GordonJ
      Originally Posted by Nour Haba View Post

      Check out creative circus or Miami Ad School
      You bring up a good lesson. Up until the 21st Century, the creative professionals who wrote copy were known as Copy Writers. The Gary Halbert Gang and that whole 70's entourage came up with copywriter, as a name for someone who is "mostly" involved in the world of direct response.

      And today, this is what people talk about when thinking AWAI and other such trainings, very few copy writers are going to start at six figures in an agency, where their jobs run the full spectrum of writing about products and services.

      It is the DIRECT RESPONSE copywriter who has the best chance of rapidly becoming a six figure or more per year writer, and these are the ones who practice "salesmanship in print".

      Here is my advice or two or three cents on this subject...learning copywriting is, like Princess B pointed out, a life time course, a never ending learning experience which doesn't end with a piece of paper hanging on a wall.

      BUT, that doesn't mean it takes years to become good enough to start making 6 figures a year if that is your magical goal.

      I believe a combination of learning techniques works best for most people, but at the top of the pile of what to do is

      WRITE TO SELL SOMETHING immediately. Put your learning to use right now, you are ready to make some discoveries. Also, if you find a good fit with a mentor, that may be the best and fastest way to reaching whatever goals you have set for yourself.

      Only thing about mentors is, measure thrice-cut once. Make sure you fit with your mentor's philosophy and resonate on principles.

      So, AWAI or any of the START HERE courses will do, but begin to sell something right now. Maybe your second TV on craigslist or offerup. Maybe a simple one page hotsheet or infographic sold via a one page website.

      By having an OFFER out there, you learn the process. First thing, people have to find or come across your promotion, they have to find your wonderful words. Only then can you begin to evaluate your work, by using analysis of

      where do your prospects come from
      What are they looking for
      how do you quickly capture their attention
      and keep it

      and how many do what you want them to do, be it give up an email, or click a link or a buy button

      you have to know these things to determine if your writing is doing the trick.

      And you can do this quite simply and quickly, learn as you go, but learn both from people and course as well as from your own efforts to influence people.

      Begin today, right now, and find something to sell (a couple of ideas have been given regarding affiliate products already)...

      and then figure out WHO your prospect is, how to get them to your promotion, what happens once they get there, and you KNOW if you are improving and growing as you learn.

      Alas, few do it, but feel free to spend thousands of your parent's money seeking the education you think will take you to your goals, I'd be inclined to ask them for a little help on getting traffic to your promotion, and what that is, or looks like, there are tons of examples right here in the sticky post showing dozens of different copywritng teachers and their techniques.

      OR, go to a school like MIAMI AD school, spend the dough, get the piece of paper and go forth and compete with tens of thousands of creatives who have MBA's.

      Writers write.
      Copywriters (the DR kind) sell.

      So write to sell something TODAY.

      GordonJ
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      • Originally Posted by GordonJ View Post

        Here is my advice or two or three cents on this subject...learning copywriting is, like Princess B pointed out, a life time course, a never ending learning experience which doesn't end with a piece of paper hanging on a wall.
        Typo buffs gonna be especially pleased by how the smarts firin' up this thread kinda work equally better if'n we switch out COURSE for CURSE.

        Momentary accolades're merely steps on, an' if'n you srs, that means encounterin' possibility's edge in a way makes backward more plummetful than forward.
        Signature

        Lightin' fuses is for blowin' stuff together.

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  • Profile picture of the author Mark 99
    First thing I would suggest is reading breakthrough advertising by Eugene Schwartz and great leads by Michael Masterson.
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  • Profile picture of the author romon132
    There are two books by Herschell Gordon Lewis that will show you everything you need to know: On the Art of Writing Copy and Power Copywriting. Collecting examples of good copywriting and studying them will give you additional insights. Read tons and tons of good writing (fiction and non-fiction) and practice writing everyday. Nobody can really teach you to be a copywriter, but they may help you hone your skills, so almost any course could be a benefit. Look for something offered as an e-book or e-course from Robert Bly. Keep in mind that clear thinking and clear writing are inextricably mixed: If you can't think clearly, you can't write clearly. Finally, I like to tell people that I chose to write for a living because writing is mostly thinking and thinking is indistinguishable from doing nothing.
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  • Profile picture of the author Enfusia
    If you REALLY want to learn copy writing then here's the BEST way.

    Write a short eBook that solves a problem, such as: Help I've Fallen And I Can't Reach My Beer.

    Just joking. It could be why they can't lose weight, acne, dating - whatever.

    Just make sure you really solve the problem.

    Build the site.
    Write the sales letter.
    Write the opt in page
    Write your freebie.
    Write the emails.
    Write the ads.

    And sell your book.

    You'll learn more this way, by doing, then you ever will by courses.

    You'll learn what works and what doesn't in the real world.
    Signature
    Free eBook =>
    The Secret To Success In Any Business
    Yes, Any Business!
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by Enfusia View Post

      If you REALLY want to learn copy writing then here's the BEST way.

      Write a short eBook that solves a problem, such as: Help I've Fallen And I Can't Reach My Beer.

      Just joking. It could be why they can't lose weight, acne, dating - whatever.

      Just make sure you really solve the problem.

      Build the site.
      Write the sales letter.
      Write the opt in page
      Write your freebie.
      Write the emails.
      Write the ads.

      And sell your book.

      You'll learn more this way, by doing, then you ever will by courses.

      You'll learn what works and what doesn't in the real world.
      This will work even better if someone has at least a clue about what they're doing going in. Without some kind of framework, this is a recipe for frustration.

      I'm not saying this framework has to come from a course, but for many people, a good course will provide the knowledge/training to give a good jumping off point for your plan.

      You do have a legit point, though. Once you have a basic grounding in something, the only way to truly master it is by doing. The only way to catch a fish is by getting your hooks wet.
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      • Profile picture of the author Enfusia
        Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

        This will work even better if someone has at least a clue about what they're doing going in. Without some kind of framework, this is a recipe for frustration.

        I'm not saying this framework has to come from a course, but for many people, a good course will provide the knowledge/training to give a good jumping off point for your plan.

        You do have a legit point, though. Once you have a basic grounding in something, the only way to truly master it is by doing. The only way to catch a fish is by getting your hooks wet.

        Hi John,


        Yes, that's what I really meant was what you said at the end.


        People read course after course, buy WSO after WSO. But, in the end, there is nothing like getting your hooks wet as you said.



        At some point you have to just do it.
        Signature
        Free eBook =>
        The Secret To Success In Any Business
        Yes, Any Business!
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  • Profile picture of the author Judey
    If you're searching for one the best course for copywriting then i suggest you go for the AWAI Accelerated program, it's definitely great.
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  • Profile picture of the author oppyeaunome
    A good one that I've been through was Copyhour.

    In that course you go over some of the great letters of old and then you hand copy them out. It helps you to get into the mind of the copywriter as they are writing the letter.

    It also gives you some guidance as to why the writer choose the words that they did and stuff like that. The course goes from A to Z on how to craft a sales message.

    Another good one if you're just starting out is Neville Medhora's Kopywriting Kourse. Neville is a fun guy and he helps you to get up and running with copy quickly. Note that it is just a beginner type of course.

    Copyhour only opens up a few times per year, but when it does you should really check it out. It's really worth the investment.

    Hope that helps.
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  • Profile picture of the author Maxine Parks
    I personally took Anik Singal's online copywriting course through Lurn academy. It was expensive, but honestly worth it to me. I learned so much about writing, marketing, and gained invaluable resources.

    I should really be an affiliate the way that I talk about this program
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  • Profile picture of the author Vygintas Varnas
    I didn't read all the answers.

    If I were you I would find poorly made websites and offer them to rewrite their content for free. Most would accept and you would get a portfolio you could show for your future clients.
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  • Profile picture of the author AndrewCavanagh
    If you want to go old school...which I strongly recommend...you can do it free.

    Go through a pile of the great ads in hardtofindads.com from Gary Halbert and Eugene Schwartz then copy out all the best headlines onto file cards.

    And hand write or type the ads out so you get used to the flow and structure of well written copy.

    The reality of courses is they're only worth what you put in and if you really want to be a great direct response copywriter you need 3 basic skills:
    1. A knowledge of what converts in copy.
    2. The ability to sell
    3. The ability to write

    You can develop number 1 and 3 by writing out great sales letters and headlines.

    For number 2 if you haven't done it you may need to get some selling experience.

    I hope that helps.

    Kindest regards,
    Andrew Cavanagh
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