Schwartz's Breakthrough advertising market awareness and sophistication mixing for headline...

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Anyone here use this methodology? I'm working with a market that is highly sophisticated-- the claims and ads have been around for over 50 years, but the target market is not necessarily informed or believes that the product will fulfill their desire. One the one hand, I should be identifying with the market because of their sophistication. But, I need to reinforce how the product will fulfill the their desire.

Am I interpreting this wrong? Do I need to blend the two to make my headline?
#advertising #awareness #breakthrough #headline #market #mixing #schwartz’s #sophistication
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  • Profile picture of the author SARubin
    It seems like you may be overthinking this a bit. The main thing is (and will always be) "where is your markets mindset at" ?


    I've read Breakthrough Advertising, twice. It's a brilliant book, but I don't really think of it as a "methodology" as much as a "conceptual way of thinking about, and creating promotions." (tamayto...tamahto?)

    Of course, market awareness and sophistication is always an important factor, but only to the degree that it can help you understand where your markets mindset is at. And based on your question, I'd say it's not the most important factor in your case.


    If the claims and ads have been around for over 50 years, but the market is still not informed... then how sophisticated can the market really be?

    And if they don't believe the product will fulfill their desires... Then that stands as evidence of how "time and saturation" do not always lead to confidence in a product (sometimes it just leads to jaded cynicism) In which case an angle of "authenticity and trust" will always be your best bet.

    Truth be told... now more than ever, authenticity and trust are a valuable currency for any company. (if they want to stay in business very long)



    As far as starting your message (headline and lede)...

    On one hand... we always want to start by speaking directly to the person, and try to join the conversation already going on inside their heads. So if they're uninformed, or simply don't believe the claims, then it's your job to empathize with where they're at, and show them, guide them, and prove to them how your product can improve their lives.

    Your headline needs to get their attention by calling out your target audience... And offer them a way to remove their pain, or offer a promise of a better future.



    On the other hand... (Well, on my other hand there's four fingers and a thumb. So I guess there's only one hand to consider here... and that is "what does your audience want, and how can you tie your product into those desires")



    Here's an example of what I'm getting at: Life insurance has been around for a very long time. Many people don't want it, or don't think they need it, but most people are still aware that it exists (market sophistication?) So our job is to explain how it can benefit them, and why our solution is the best choice.

    It still comes down to your audiences desires (not so much their awareness of the product)

    If I'm young and just starting a family, then sell me life insurance on the idea of taking care of my young family if I suddenly die.

    If I'm already established, and my children are grown, then you're better off selling me whole life insurance as a secure, wealth building, financial vehicle.

    Same product... Two different motivations for buying.


    So my main advice for you right now is to think a little less about market sophistication, and think a little more about what pain, hopes, dreams or desires your target audience has. And how your product can tie into, and give them what they want in their lives.

    Good luck with your promotion.


    All the best,
    SAR


    Originally Posted by Onenamefitsall View Post

    Anyone here use this methodology? I'm working with a market that is highly sophisticated-- the claims and ads have been around for over 50 years, but the target market is not necessarily informed or believes that the product will fulfill their desire. One the one hand, I should be identifying with the market because of their sophistication. But, I need to reinforce how the product will fulfill the their desire.

    Am I interpreting this wrong? Do I need to blend the two to make my headline?
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    "It all boils down to psychology, and numbers"
    SARubin - Direct Response Copywriter / Advertising and Marketing Aficionado
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  • Profile picture of the author Dogfish451
    Oh my God, don't you realize you're messing with one of the Gods of Advertising? It doesn't matter how long his ads have been around for. They tap into human psychology. Which never changes. Focus on shocking your customer with PERCEIVED GENEROSITY!
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