What is the best way to find good clients?

by Julk
23 replies
Hi,

I'm trying to get started on copywriting, and I'm tired of trying to get my first gigs on sites like fiverr or upwork. I've been practicing sending out cold emails, but it's hard to find good businesses that aren't too high-end and would actually hire someone who's just starting out.

Any help? I'd appreciate it.
#clients #find #good
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  • Profile picture of the author SARubin
    OK, I'm going to ask you a few quick questions. And depending on your answers, I may (or may not) come back here and offer you some guidance...



    1 - What exactly are you selling? (or what do you think you're selling)


    2a - Who (or "whom" if we want to be grammarians) are you selling it to?

    2b - What are your ideal clients buying from you? (or what do you think they're buying)


    3 - Why are you selling it? (why do you want to be a copywriter)



    These are basic questions that will help us determine if you're even ready to move on from the freelance farms.


    I'll check back later (maybe tonight?... maybe tomorrow?) and if no one else has steered you in a direction, I'll see if I can help you out (depending on your answers to the questions)

    .
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    If your advertising is not getting you the results you want to see... I can show you how to fix it - Direct Response Copywriter / Conversion Flow Specialist

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    • Profile picture of the author Julk
      Hi there,

      1. I'm selling my copywriting services, focusing on content writing and blog/article content. I'm also learning about marketing and sales funnels, so I'm hoping I can get some experience on that pretty soon.
      2a. I was thinking of small-time entrepreneurs or solopreneurs whom will agree to work with someone with no experience. I don't have a defined niche or client preference yet since I've never had a client before.
      2b. My copywriting services. I'd also offer my expertise on marketing and whatever other skill if necessary (I have knowledge of coding and graphic design)
      3. That's a tough one. The main reason I wanna be a copywriter is because I like the freedom and responsibility of working as a freelancer. I had a part-time office job one summer and I can't imagine myself going back to that place again. I dread having a boss or being stuck in one place for long periods of time everyday.

      What did you mean by moving on from the "freelance farms" though? Never heard that term before.
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      • Profile picture of the author SARubin
        OK, those are some answers we can work with...

        Honestly, I half expected you to come back here saying you just wanted to make 6 figures within 6 months, working from a tropical island two hours a week (or something similar). Because that's the dream you were sold

        And then I was going to tell you to keep dreaming, and come back when you were ready for a dose of reality.


        But since you actually gave some thought to your answers, I believe you deserve a reply that has some thought put into it as well.

        I started replying here, but true to form my response started turning into an endlessly scrolling narrative. So I'm going to finish it offline... put it into a PDF... load it to one of my websites... and I'll PM you a link where you can read it if you want to.

        I'll send you the link in a couple hours (once I finish brain dumping my thoughts onto the page for you)


        All the best,
        SAR
        Originally Posted by Julk View Post

        Hi there,

        1. I'm selling my copywriting services, focusing on content writing and blog/article content. I'm also learning about marketing and sales funnels, so I'm hoping I can get some experience on that pretty soon.
        2a. I was thinking of small-time entrepreneurs or solopreneurs whom will agree to work with someone with no experience. I don't have a defined niche or client preference yet since I've never had a client before.
        2b. My copywriting services. I'd also offer my expertise on marketing and whatever other skill if necessary (I have knowledge of coding and graphic design)
        3. That's a tough one. The main reason I wanna be a copywriter is because I like the freedom and responsibility of working as a freelancer. I had a part-time office job one summer and I can't imagine myself going back to that place again. I dread having a boss or being stuck in one place for long periods of time everyday.

        What did you mean by moving on from the "freelance farms" though? Never heard that term before.
        Signature

        If your advertising is not getting you the results you want to see... I can show you how to fix it - Direct Response Copywriter / Conversion Flow Specialist

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        • Profile picture of the author Julk
          Alright. Thank you!
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        • Profile picture of the author Mousie
          Hello SAR. I would be most appreciative if you would be willing to share your PDF with me as well. I am looking to do the same thing.
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          • Profile picture of the author SARubin
            Originally Posted by Mousie View Post

            Hello SAR. I would be most appreciative if you would be willing to share your PDF with me as well. I am looking to do the same thing.
            Well, the PDF I gave to Julk was somewhat personalized for Julk, based on where he (or she... hard telling from a screen name on the internet) is at on his journey.

            Some of it would be useful to all... some of it wouldn't.

            So let me first ask you a couple questions...

            1 - Why do you want to be a copywriter?

            2 - What have you done so far ? (to move your writing career forward)

            3 - What exactly are you selling? (or what do you think you're selling as a copywriter)

            4 - Who are you selling it to? (who are your ideal clients )

            5 - What are your ideal clients buying from you? (or what do you think they're buying)


            I'm not saying I'll have any helpful insights for you, but we won't know until we find out where you're starting from (or as some folks in New England might say - hard tellin' without knowin')...
            Signature

            If your advertising is not getting you the results you want to see... I can show you how to fix it - Direct Response Copywriter / Conversion Flow Specialist

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    • Profile picture of the author Jiddah Reul
      Hi SARubin,

      I'd also like to take a look at the PDF. To be honest I've gotten a few clients through referrals but I recently dropped a client and have trouble filling up my calendar.

      To answer your questions, so you don't have to repeat them.

      1. My offer is that I'll do a diagnosis and deep dive of their marketing and sales process and improve on it with direct-response copy. Where I'm from, direct-response copy is practically unheard of. I also help them craft their core messages, brand story, and unique edge to stand out in their market.

      2a. I'm targeting small companies & businesses already with a proven sales process, getting five-figure sales, and helping them double on triple their sales by improving their funnel, doing deeper market research, and testing multiple hooks, angles, and stories.

      2b. Businesses are buying a solution to help them increase their sales. A lot of them are product focused and don't put much thought into optimizing their sales process or marketing messages. I want to help them do that to increase their revenue.

      3. I've been a content writer for about 7 years as a hobby. Copywriter for about 2 years training with a direct response company. Then left to be a freelancer for personal reasons. I also had an interest in psychology and communication so when I discovered copywriting, it sort of was a match made in heaven.
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      • Profile picture of the author SARubin
        Originally Posted by Jiddah Reul View Post

        Hi SARubin,

        I'd also like to take a look at the PDF. To be honest I've gotten a few clients through referrals but I recently dropped a client and have trouble filling up my calendar.

        To answer your questions, so you don't have to repeat them.

        1. My offer is that I'll do a diagnosis and deep dive of their marketing and sales process and improve on it with direct-response copy. Where I'm from, direct-response copy is practically unheard of. I also help them craft their core messages, brand story, and unique edge to stand out in their market.

        2a. I'm targeting small companies & businesses already with a proven sales process, getting five-figure sales, and helping them double on triple their sales by improving their funnel, doing deeper market research, and testing multiple hooks, angles, and stories.

        2b. Businesses are buying a solution to help them increase their sales. A lot of them are product focused and don't put much thought into optimizing their sales process or marketing messages. I want to help them do that to increase their revenue.

        3. I've been a content writer for about 7 years as a hobby. Copywriter for about 2 years training with a direct response company. Then left to be a freelancer for personal reasons. I also had an interest in psychology and communication so when I discovered copywriting, it sort of was a match made in heaven.

        Honestly, Jiddah Reul,
        The PDF I gave to Julk probably wouldn't do you much good.

        Julk came here with very little, to zero experience. And based on where he was at, the response I sent him was designed to help fast-track the progress to get him to where you're already at. ( If he follows the advice, it will give him a bit of experience with a pathway to branding himself as a writer in the eyes of his first potential clients)



        It sounds like you've already been playing this game for a couple years, and have already worked with your first clients?

        So the best advice I can give you right now, based on what I'm seeing in your words, is the same thing one of my mentors told me the first time I asked if I was ready to be a professional copywriter (I already had experience writing for my own businesses, but wasn't a "professional writer" yet)...


        Here's what I was told to do...


        First, you're going to figure out who you want as your ideal clients. (you can start with what industry you want to write for)

        Then, pick a dozen businesses that you know you can help, and that you want as clients. (based on demo, geo, size, employee count, revenue, their business philosophy, or whatever criteria you decide.)



        And then you're going to study those businesses and the people who run them.
        Side note: You want to look at businesses that already spend money on advertising. Otherwise you can waste a lot of time trying to convince someone that they need a copywriter in the first place.
        Next, learn everything you can about your chosen clients... how they do business... who their customers are... who the competition is... what the industry is struggling with... and most importantly, what the business owners are interested in (work, hobbies, or anything else you can learn about them as a person)

        Then, you're going write a sales letter to the business owners. This will be a lead generation piece selling the most important investment they could ever make for their business...

        ... YOU


        If you get a positive response, then you are now talking to a very warm lead, and you want to follow up right away with your soon-to-be client.

        If you don't get a response, then as a copywriter it's your job to figure out "why not". (go back over your research and see what you can test or tweak in your copy)

        - Did you miss something?

        - Did you pick the wrong market?

        - Was the timing off?

        - Can you tighten up the message and make it more impactful?

        - Maybe try a different teaser copy or headline?

        Sometimes it's just a matter of persistence. And after a few more contacts you might get your response.



        Either way... it's your job to figure it out.



        You can also template a rough draft for your letters, to speed up the process. But for landing better paying clients, I've always gotten a bigger impact when I fill it in with some personally identifiable words that relate to my audience. Remember what we said about "finding out what the business owners are interested in?"

        Well...

        If they're interested in boating, then you're here to help them "sail past the competition"

        If they like flying, then you're going to help them "soar above the competition"

        If they play golf, then you're going to remove the "handicap" from their full revenue potential.



        So you can use a template to save time, but each letter will be somewhat personalized to the recipient.



        This will take a bit of time and work for you. But it's what most writers today are not willing to do. And that's one reason why most of them are whoring themselves on low end freelance sites for a couple pennies a word.



        So this is NOT a mass mailing for a commodity product.

        And this is NOT a general sales pitch to get you a $50 writing gig on fiverr or freelancer


        This IS you knocking on the door of your future clients (repeat clients), and potentially adding many thousands of dollars to your annual revenue.


        Let me wrap this up by saying "when I first did this, I used direct mail and landed 3 good clients."

        It was years ago, but I highly recommend you consider using snail mail also.



        I know, I know... most people shun snail mail or personal delivery service these days, because everything is online now.

        But here's something to consider...

        While that business owner is automatically, and habitually, deleting dozens of emails (from your competitors) without giving them a second glance...

        ...your physical correspondence is sitting on the desk, patiently waiting for their full attention.



        I'm not telling you which way to go, but it is something to think about...



        I could continue with a couple other methods I've used to introduce myself to good clients, both online and offline.
        But this is a forum designed for short responses. And I've already used up enough of your time.



        Anyway, Jiddah Reul,

        Hopefully some of this makes sense to you, (and anyone else with a similar question). Especially the part about understanding your audience and how it's the pinnacle of importance for all sales copy.

        My greatest hope is that I've at least helped you move one more step forward in your journey.

        All the best,
        SAR
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        If your advertising is not getting you the results you want to see... I can show you how to fix it - Direct Response Copywriter / Conversion Flow Specialist

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  • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
    Originally Posted by Julk View Post

    Hi,

    I'm trying to get started on copywriting, and I'm tired of trying to get my first gigs on sites like fiverr or upwork. I've been practicing sending out cold emails, but it's hard to find good businesses that aren't too high-end and would actually hire someone who's just starting out.

    Any help? I'd appreciate it.
    Newer solopreneurs represent your best chance of getting copywriting jobs.

    Put together a lead generation strategy that targets them.

    Alex
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    • Profile picture of the author Julk
      Thank you for the input. Do you recommend any places in particular to find them?
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  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    copywriting services, focusing on content writing and blog/article content.
    In the marketing 'world' - copywriting is NOT the same as content writing.

    Content writing is blog posts and articles.....to inform and entertain.

    Copywriting is considered the sales copy on a page meant to lead you to buy or convince you to sign up.

    These are two different writing processes/styles and not interchangeable terms if you are selling writing as a freelancer.
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    Every child needs a pet because every family needs an optimist

    Saving one dog will not save the world....but will forever change the world for one dog.
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    • Profile picture of the author Julk
      Good point. I just read an article outlining those two differences. Thank you for your response.
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  • NEWER SOLOPRENEURS
    Take arms against the old guard & BLAST OUT!


    tbh likely you SLAVERIN' for YOUR CHANCE.

    Only you CAN'T WRITE SHIT STRAIGHT even tho yr brain is BLAMMO ON THE FYOOTURE.

    Time to hire an UNCANNILY DISPENSIBLE PATSY whose immediately glossy talents may ultimately ground your initiative in LAWSUIT NIGHTMARELAND should you later take the money an' run, claimin' she nevah pumped your baby ass fulla rockit fyool.

    Scared?

    Prolly you should be.

    BECAUSE I CAN CHANGE YOUR LIFE FOREVAH ... even tho you may ultimately REGRET IT.

    that is my skeleton script rn.

    I am mostly appealin' to anywan launchin' slip-on rubber teats for Vodka bottles or people got breakthrough solootions for world domination mean I don't gotta incinerate my own dinnah X nights outta ... X.

    Tellya, soloprenoors, you wanna fix my eats for free so I don't gotta STARVE, ima prolly tattoo your butt cheeks with the permanent ink of BRANDED illoosory saliva jus' for the crack ...
    Signature

    Lightin' fuses is for blowin' stuff together.

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    • Profile picture of the author Julk
      I've seen way too many posts like this on this forum. Is it an inside joke or something?
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  • Low priced good quality offer is always something people are looking for. Provide great value in the marketplace will definitely help you to get your first sale.
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  • Profile picture of the author kate palagam
    [DELETED]
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    • Profile picture of the author juliakuz
      You are right. If you are a persistent guy, all these recommendations will be helpful. However, you should prepare to wait for at least a month to get a result.
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  • Profile picture of the author max5ty
    Contrary to what some may say...

    a blog post can actually be a very good method a copywriter can use to boost business.

    I understand why some think blog posts don't fall into the copywriting category...but they often are an overlooked way to sell more than a sales letter.

    I've written a few blog posts for companies that have gone viral and put a company out there. Although the post didn't ask for a direct sale...it prompted tons of sign-ups for the companies which led to a crap load of sales and recognition.

    Almost every major blog that's followed by large numbers, is written by a talented writer...throw in a good copywriter and you have a win-win.

    I could list 8 companies off the top of my head that was a nobody until a blog post sent them viral...all because a very smart copywriter got involved haha.

    I like to use the EAT24 post about how they decided to advertise on porn sites. Was a very controversial post that some thought would backfire, but ended up going viral and making them a household name. They were sold a few years ago to GrubHub. A little company that used a blog post to make a big name.

    There's also the company started by Larry Kim after he sold his multi-million dollar company...the blog post called out a competitor...something risky...and now his company is taking off.

    Woot.com use to be a company that I followed that took off huge because of good copywriting. Not so much since Amazon bought them. Anyways, Jason Toon (one of their main writers) still works as a copywriter as far as I know. I know he started another site but not sure how its's doing. He did a great job for Woot though.

    Don't overlook a good blog post...it can pay huge dividends if done right.

    But to the OP...just offering to do low priced work is still a risk for a company.

    They still put a lot of money into reputation, depending on what you're offering. It can backfire on a company not just in initial cost but also reputation (which can be worth millions)...so their trust isn't just based on the price you offer. You're also asking them to trust you with their reputation.

    There are so many products out there you can sell...I've said before many times, if you're a good copywriter you should have no problem finding your own product and making it successful. Instead of asking a company to let you practice using their money and reputation, sell a product first and prove you know what you're doing.

    Best wishes.
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  • Let us consider INFOPULSISMO --



    speshly cos'n when I proclaim
    THIS DON'T EXIST LESS'N I SAY SO

    See, cos now I got trooth on my side 'steada the deloosion sum people here figure OOZES OUTTA MY FLAPS ALL KINDA DEFAULT.

    You on that team ... besta luck, Sweeties.

    Thing is, we all got problems to solve, whichevah place in our lives we at.

    And, as exotically idiosycratic hearts-made-flesh, rockin' out best we can in a world fulla similar wonders, always we gotta consider ...

    what steps forward may I take right now?

    If'n I wanna do so, an' I like kinda wanna?

    Frickin' AMOEBA got no problems here, tellya.

    "Yeah, cos like me and the guys slooshie around here all day, with zero clue about what we're doing -- meaning fear of our ultimate demise ranks alongside our appreciation of opportunities arising as a direct result of our consummate BRAINO POWAH like ineffectual f*cking around on an eternity-specific ticket in an evolutionary blender."

    So lemme ask evrywan a question here.

    You got the slooshin to EVRYTHIN for EVRYWAN rn?

    (Tellya, as a PRINCESS, I am all too aware of the potential hubris issues inherent in proclaimin' yusself as sum kinda GAAAAHD.)

    Anyways, pulsin' out transformative info rocks super always.

    For sure we got overload now, nets & socmed & fake nooz & stuff, all kinda confoosed -- but people ain't stoopid.

    Wheat an' chaff're eternal, like stayin' alive, so prolly we gonna figure stuff.

    YADDA YADDA ain't no sound I EVAH wanna hear from offah my footfall.

    So mebbe spark my heels to ground with INFOPULSISMO ...so I got a fyooture fulla exotica ain't jus' 'bout favo stasis stuffs keepin' evrythin' same.

    "Succor of sweet sensation, flowin' out free in my direction, as I happenstance my fleeting exotica before tumult of gloom" -- gotta figure always this is what Joan of Arc prolly wanted to say 'steada AAAAAAAHHHHRRRRRGGGGHHH when a whole buncha dumbshits incinerated her ass.

    Alternative view, I guess, is how tamara gonna inject SERIOUS ZILCHO into evrywan's life stories.

    World rocks on Infopulsismo (or whatevah else kinda word any f*ckah says it does), an' long as we don't get too busted out on whatevah we discovah this means for evrywan steada nowan, prolly we always gonna wish to kiss up sweet.
    Signature

    Lightin' fuses is for blowin' stuff together.

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  • Profile picture of the author amuro
    Hi I don't mean to be blunt by what I am about to say and if I do, I will apologize in advance but those are my thoughts from the bottom of my heart.

    To me, there is no such thing as good or bad clients.

    But there is such a thing as good or bad service.

    And the reason why I said that is because in my country Singapore, we focuses very much on social and community values.

    In particular customer service.

    So the correct question you should be asking is - what products and services can I offer that will help my clients improve their lives?

    Instead of asking how you can find good clients.

    Because in my 22 years of marketing, there aren't really any.

    Someone can be your best friend or ideal prospect.

    But if your service sucks as in NOt providing him with the help and support he needs as customer on how to use your products - does not matter what they are, then he or she can be your worst or even nightmare client.

    People get agitated for many reasons.

    1. Their meets and wants are not met

    2. Because of their bad experiences with previous salespeople.


    So the correct question you should be asking -

    Is how can I best serve people in my products and services -

    That will make them remember me more and even referred their families and friends to me in the long run -

    So that me marketing becomes easier in such that -

    I will not be the one looking for them.

    But they come looking for me to advise and help.
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    • Profile picture of the author Kinya Shelley
      I disagree. There is definitely such a thing as a bad client, just like there's such a thing as a bad customer. The client/customer isn't always right.
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  • Profile picture of the author Kinya Shelley
    I think the biggest mistake new copywriters make is trying to compete with people who charge little or nothing.

    There is a market for people who charge more than 5 cents a word. There are people out there who realize you actually get what you pay for. You can find them here, on WF. They have no problem shelling out the money to get the quality that they want. But you have to deliver it.

    In all honesty, your samples speak for themselves. Are your samples worth the price you're charging? You should write sample blog posts, either for your own blog or for others.

    You only need three samples, no more than five. Contact people with blogs and offer to do a trade: you'll do their next blog post for free if they allow you to use it in their portfolio. This is also a good way to get testimonials.
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  • Profile picture of the author JrSezk
    One strategy that you can actually use, is not only cold emailing potential clients.
    Offer the clients cheap service, but of really good quality.

    You have nothing right now which is good too.
    You have to build on nothing. And the only way is to provide others with low prices in order for you to actually get a client.

    Try doing 5$ for 1000 words or 1500 words. With a really quick turn around time.
    Some people want it cheap, well let's be honest. 70% want it cheap and quick.

    You can build off this and then when you are done with like a couple of clients and you have actually written a couple of articles etc. You can then increase the price, provide more potential customers with your samples (your previous work)

    Or another thing you can do is, you can tell the client that they hire you as a trial ( like an intern with no or little to no pay ) and then you make a deal, if they like the work that you do, tell them to hire you with the price that you want. ( But don't go overboard, keep it low as you are just starting )

    Well this is just my 2 cents.
    I have tried this and it works for me. Even though its alot of hard work. But you gotta bust your ass, grind grind grind. Till you get there.

    And YOU WILL GET THERE!
    Good luck buddy.
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  • Profile picture of the author webcontent
    The most excellent way to find good customers is advertising. The cornerstone to advertising progressively is to create promising leads in substitute for the money you invest. To perform so, it supports to provide a message that not only strikes your target clients, but even display the worth you can grant them. To switch to web advertisement scheme, you must first build a Web presence. Then, relying on your target customers or enterprises, select your web channel. LinkedIn is a perfect resort among enterprises, business owners and CEOs, whereas Facebook lingers as greatly popular among consumers.
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    Working at Thoughtfulminds offering content writing services and Wordpress Website Development to help small, medium and large enterprises mark their presence.

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