Should i write about copywriting topics?

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I want to be a copywriter. Right now I am in the learning stage. Is it necessary to write about copywriting topics so that it could increase my chances to land a client?
Since i am new to it, wouldn't it be too early to write about them?
#copywriting #topics #write
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  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    What is a 'copywriting topic'? A thread that might help is


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  • Yes, agreed ^. If by "copywriting topic" you mean "write about the craft of copywriting to establish authority," I'd say no - better to practice writing actual copy first. There are a number of helpful threads in this site to help steer you there (as well as some good paid courses to help fast track it, if you're interested in that route.)

    IMO a client (on Upwork or other "starting out" sites) is much more likely to hire you based on a sample that's relevant to their specific project than based on links to articles about other general copywriting topics...
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  • Profile picture of the author DABK
    That would depend on what you actually have to say. I mean, which topic you choose and how much authority you convey.


    A "How I increased a website conversion rate from 2.4% to 9.3%" is a copywriting topic that would get someone like me (business owner) interested in you.


    If I get to see that piece of content.


    So, if you're good at SEO and have money for advertising and have the experience (or the knowledge), go for it.


    I say 'or the knowledge' because the topic can be changed to "How to increase a website conversion from 2.4% to 9.3%" without total loss of credibility or authority.
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  • Profile picture of the author koolstories
    Yes do write about copywriting topics so that fellow budding copywriters have some knowledge about the domain.
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  • Originally Posted by Tamim007 View Post

    I want to be a copywriter. Right now I am in the learning stage. Is it necessary to write about copywriting topics so that it could increase my chances to land a client?
    Since i am new to it, wouldn't it be too early to write about them?
    That means you aren't one yet.
    No. Don't write about copywriting. Wait until you have some expertise. Right now, you would just be letting potential clients know that you are just starting out the learning process.

    Write to sell something. Anything. That's practice. Eventually, your training will pay you, and then you will have something to write about.

    Get a few clients for free. Don't charge them. Practice. Study. find successful ads and see what makes them work.

    Then, when you have unpaid clients that are getting results, you'll have something to bring to the table. Evidence, testimonials, proof you know what you are doing.

    I'm not a copywriter. I'm a salesman. But if I were just starting out learning about how to sell, and wrote articles about how to sell, I would just prove that I don't know how to sell yet.

    Anyway, I hope that helps you.
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  • Profile picture of the author SARubin
    Whenever I see Claude post in a sales thread, I automatically assume it's worth paying attention to. So I'll add my 3 cents to this topic and try to pick up where he left off...


    Originally Posted by Tamim007 View Post

    I want to be a copywriter. Right now I am in the learning stage. Is it necessary to write about copywriting topics so that it could increase my chances to land a client?
    No, it isn't necessary to write about copywriting topics to land a client.

    I won't tell you it's a bad idea, but it's certainly not the most productive way I've found to attract new clients.

    In fact, I've written dozens of copywriting articles on my blog, and so far it's helped me land a total of one (1) new client. And even that was an unexpected event. Fortunately, for me that was never the intent of my blog anyway (it's mostly just a creative outlet to give my ADHD someplace to go on my off days)



    But the real flaw with your question is, you've barely even begun your education and you're already wondering how to land a client?

    What will you do if you actually land a client and have to prove your skills in the real world?

    It's a bit like a puppy running out the door to chase a car down the street. If he actually catches the car... Then what? (most puppies don't think that far ahead)


    Now if you're actually referring to "content writing" (instead of copywriting) and your potential clients own copywriting blogs, then it might be a good idea to build a portfolio about copywriting topics.


    But if we're talking about sales copy, and you'd like to keep a client longer than 5 minutes...

    Better you should focus on getting some real world sales experience first, then learn to write copy, before looking for a client.

    At least start with the basics, like...

    Understanding salesmanship and the difference between features and benefits

    Understanding target markets and consumer behavior in general

    Learn how to target the right markets for different offers

    Learn how to identify a big idea and a good hook in a product, and how to connect that with what your market already wants


    Then you can start learning to write headlines, opening ledes, offers, guarantees, calls to action...



    Once you learn the basics, then it's time to use your copywriting to actually sell something in the real world.

    Pick something to sell. It can be your own product or an affiliate product, or it can even be selling your copywriting services to your potential clients.

    Then based on your understanding of everything I just mentioned above, write your copy and test it in the market.

    This is your real training ground because the market won't hesitate to let you know if your copy is any good.

    If it sells... then it's good

    If it doesn't... then it's not, and it's our job to figure out why not. (wrong market? wrong message? wrong medium? bad timing?)

    Once we get some results we look at the numbers, make adjustments, and test it again (rinse and repeat) until we get some acceptable response rates (or until we decide it's not worth it and we move on to something else)

    After you have a couple winners under your belt it's a whole lot easier to attract more clients. Sometimes they even come looking for YOU.


    Bottom line... If you're looking to land some copywriting clients, my best advice is to learn some basic salesmanship and copywriting first. That way when you do land some clients you have a better chance to keep them for a few years.



    And if you still want to write about copywriting topics... Once you've sold something through the written word you'll be able to write better articles about copywriting. Articles with more genuine authority and authenticity behind them, because it will be something you actually know about.

    Originally Posted by Tamim007 View Post

    Since i am new to it, wouldn't it be too early to write about them?
    Yes it would...
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    • Originally Posted by SARubin View Post

      Whenever I see Claude post in a sales thread, I automatically assume it's worth paying attention to. So I'll add my 3 cents to this topic and try to pick up where he left off...
      That means a lot to me.


      Originally Posted by SARubin View Post

      After you have a couple winners under your belt it's a whole lot easier to attract more clients. Sometimes they even come looking for YOU.

      When I used to speak to groups of advertising reps, I'd tell them that the single most profitable thing they can learn is how to create ads that actually sell.. How to bring in buyers of their client's offers.

      I told them that if they just learned how to make their ads pay, they would never have to cold call again, and after the first ad, a client would never let them go. They would become indispensable to their company and to their clients.

      I honestly don't think I've ever talked to an ad rep that knew anything about how to write profitable ads. and I've met hundreds.

      Originally Posted by AdmanMrWoo View Post

      When I was a young copywriter I was competing to land this one client... and my competition had written a book on advertising. I hadn't.

      He got the job and I didn't.

      His book gave him authority.
      .
      I don't know if I remember getting a client right from a book I wrote. But the books sure got me plenty of interviews and speaking engagements...and they got me plenty of clients.
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  • Profile picture of the author AdmanMrWoo
    When I was a young copywriter I was competing to land this one client... and my competition had written a book on advertising. I hadn't.

    He got the job and I didn't.

    His book gave him authority.

    On another occasion, I got the client because the old ad guy put typo's in the ad.

    Just between you and me, I also put a typo or two in the ads I created, but he didn't notice because my copy was so long. But he got more business from my ads than the old guys.

    Just thinkin.
    Linwood.
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    • Profile picture of the author AdmanMrWoo
      [QUOTE= On another occasion, I got the client because the old ad guy put typo's in the ad.

      Just between you and me, I also put a typo or two in the ads I created, but he didn't notice because my copy was so long. But he got more business from my ads than the old guys.

      Linwood.[/QUOTE]


      SPEAKING OF TYPO's.

      There is some evidence that typo's help your sales instead of hurting them.

      Just thinkin' again.
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      • Profile picture of the author Jonathan 2.0
        Originally Posted by AdmanMrWoo View Post

        SPEAKING OF TYPO's.

        There is some evidence that typo's help your sales instead of hurting them.
        .
        As a complete guess, I would say that's because it makes the Ad seem more "Personal, authentic, or sincere" ... However there are much, much better ways of communicating that.
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  • Profile picture of the author marciayudkin
    SPEAKING OF TYPO's.

    There is some evidence that typo's help your sales instead of hurting them.
    As someone who is right now finishing up creating a course on how to prevent typos, I would love to see that evidence since I already have so much evidence to the contrary.

    Thank you.

    Marcia Yudkin
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    • Ill let AdManMrWoo reply here, but from what I recall on this, it has something to do with the "wrongness" of a word/phrase causing one to pause/hover/over/pay *more* attention to it, and consequently increase retention
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  • Profile picture of the author marciayudkin
    Ill let AdManMrWoo reply here, but from what I recall on this, it has something to do with the "wrongness" of a word/phrase causing one to pause/hover/over/pay *more* attention to it, and consequently increase retention
    Thank you, but increasing retention is beside the point. If I remember the typo and decide not to buy from such a sloppy company, how does that help sales?

    I would like to see evidence that typos improve sales.

    Marcia Yudkin
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    • Originally Posted by marciayudkin View Post

      Thank you, but increasing retention is beside the point. If I remember the typo and decide not to buy from such a sloppy company, how does that help sales?

      I would like to see evidence that typos improve sales.

      Marcia Yudkin
      My guess is that this idea works better if you are writing a sales letter disguised as a hand written note from an individual. It will look a little more personal...and yes, it draws attention.

      But a business sales letter. A professional sales page? No. It would distract in the wrong way.
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      • My guess is that this idea works better if you are writing a sales letter disguised as a hand written note from an individual.
        That's a good distinction - and would agree about the personal aspect of it making it potentially more resonant in certain contexts. In some email marketing, for example, I find typos or cartoonishly/humorously misspelled words can, at times, increase the entertainment value and perception that the email comes from a friend / close confidant.

        More broadly, I think I was also thinking of - and lumping - sales page aesthetic (and more specifically, how "ugly" sites can sometimes convert better by standing out more) in my response about "typos", which I should've made clear and addressed as a separate point about counterintuitive 'errors' (albeit I realize you're focused on typos and haven't made mention of design.)
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  • Profile picture of the author Jonathan 2.0
    Originally Posted by Tamim007 View Post

    I want to be a copywriter. Right now I am in the learning stage. Is it necessary to write about copywriting topics so that it could increase my chances to land a client?
    Since i am new to it, wouldn't it be too early to write about them?
    To land a Client? Probably not. However as a Copywriting Student there's nothing stopping you from creating a site where you share what you're learning. Providing it's solid information/knowledge it could be a good idea. Don't quote me on that though -- it's just a thought.

    P.S.
    The domain name (and countless others) available is: CopyNewbie.com

    A Person doesn't have to be an "expert" to write a book/product review or summary ... And providing valuable step-by-step/how-to information as well could be a winning strategy IMO.
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  • Think so, I also did it on my site.
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  • Profile picture of the author marciayudkin
    SPEAKING OF TYPO's.

    There is some evidence that typo's help your sales instead of hurting them.
    I tried to find that evidence, but instead I found studies showing the opposite.

    Here are four of the recent studies I found:

    In studies by University of Michigan linguists Julie Boland and Robin Green that asked respondents to rate how desirable someone would be as a housemate, applicants who sent emails riddled with typos or grammar flubs got lower ratings than those without writing errors.

    At the peer lending site Lending Tree, loan requests containing spelling mistakes were less likely to attract funding.

    In a UK survey of 1000+ adults, 59 percent said bad grammar or misspellings stop them from buying from a website, most saying they wouldn't trust the company to provide good quality service. Others said online bloopers evidenced carelessness or unprofessionalness.

    When SurveyMonkey asked 1000+ American adults if mistakes on a website would make them think twice about buying there, 85 percent of Millennials said yes.

    Again, if anyone knows of genuine evidence that typos or other errors improve response, I would love to see it. And by the way, the proofreading course for which I did this research is now finished: Proofreading Hacks

    Marcia Yudkin
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    • Originally Posted by marciayudkin View Post

      I tried to find that evidence, but instead I found studies showing the opposite.

      Marcia Yudkin

      Dontchya jus' love it when sumone writes in clear & flooid Hingerlish?


      "Seems like I knew that already, of felt it before -- or it is a genuine surprise if I am mistaken on either count."
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  • Profile picture of the author max5ty
    No bad grammar or poor punctuation doesn't sell.

    You'll look like an idiot and a hack that is working out of their moms basement.

    Haven't seen any fortune 500 company or any other fortune whatever use bad spelling to get where they are.

    The whole thing about bad grammar is just a headline that grabs attention and sells some idiot that is still sitting around looking for another shiny thing that leads them into a whole different few days of exploring more bs while they sit on their rear waiting for the right idea to launch their thing.

    Nonsense.

    Hopefully I used proper
    punctuation and grammar...
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  • Profile picture of the author Naheed
    @Tamim,
    I would say it is necessary to write about the copywriting topics. When we write the copy, we are given the topic by the client. Make a little research on copywriting, prepare your efficient portfolio, and offer your services on online marketplaces like Fiverr, Upwork, Freelancers.com, etc.
    All the best
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  • Profile picture of the author Skeep2020
    Hello,
    If you're a Copywriter the best thing is to find a niche. What's your niche? with a niche you'll be able to find a good focus and locate your clients more easily. Additionally, you also need to write a lot just about anything to train yourself and mind about copywriting.
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