Using Transubstantiation In Your Sales Copy

by Tony M
11 replies
A couple months back I picked up a copy of Bob Bly's "Killer Copywriting Secrets."

Now that I have more free time on my hands I've been listening to it everyday now for a couple of weeks.

If you've ever snatched a copy of his "Copywriters Handbook" (which I highly recommend you do if you haven't), Killer Copywriting Secrets is 'somewhat' an audio version of his book, tightly packed into 3 hours of just pure tips and strategies.

In the first CD he quickly covers a strategy that I can't seem to find in his book called, Transubstantiation.

As he puts it, Transubstantiation is when you "begin with an idea that seems like an impossibility and is advertised by a claim that sounds like a lie."

He gave a couple of examples in a article I found from Early to Rise back in 2004 (link below).

For some reason I'm having a hard time wrapping my head around the concept.

I'd love to hear everyone chime in on the subject.

I provided a link to the article below.

https://www.earlytorise.com/the-secret-of-transubstantiation-part-1/
#copy #sales #transubstantiation
Avatar of Unregistered
  • Profile picture of the author GordonJ
    Originally Posted by Tony M View Post

    A couple months back I picked up a copy of Bob Bly's "Killer Copywriting Secrets."

    Now that I have more free time on my hands I've been listening to it everyday now for a couple of weeks.

    If you've ever snatched a copy of his "Copywriters Handbook" (which I highly recommend you do if you haven't), Killer Copywriting Secrets is 'somewhat' an audio version of his book, tightly packed into 3 hours of just pure tips and strategies.

    In the first CD he quickly covers a strategy that I can't seem to find in his book called, Transubstantiation.

    As he puts it, Transubstantiation is when you "begin with an idea that seems like an impossibility and is advertised by a claim that sounds like a lie."

    He gave a couple of examples in a article I found from Early to Rise back in 2004 (link below).

    For some reason I'm having a hard time wrapping my head around the concept.

    I'd love to hear everyone chime in on the subject.

    I provided a link to the article below.
    First thing, I like Bly. Good teacher, good writer.

    My first encounter with the subject was WONDER BREAD, how by eating this crap (my father called it) one could build strong bones and health.

    We lived a couple of blocks from the WONDER BREAD outlet store, and we were NEVER allowed to eat White Bread.

    In marketing and copy, if you can think of WONDER BREAD, and how it was/is marketed, it could serve you as the prime example of turning one thing into something else. Catholics are taught and raised with transubstantiation TSS with wine and bread...
    (NOT being a Catholic, I don't know what the wafer is made from).

    But it is one of those little known or used (consciously) techniques.

    AWAI will turn anyone who can write "this simple letter" into a high paid, in demand copywriter for only a few hundred bux...

    THAT is one of the best TSS ideas there is. You take one thing, and turn it into the other.

    I think you will find those Amish fire heaters, not only being an oxymoron, but it turns one thing into another. It takes an ordinary space heater and turns it into a hand crafted, beautiful piece of furniture, see?

    GordonJ

    PS Check out the WSO section, and see how many Warriors can be changed into IM successes with just a little help from a friendly Warrior...HA!

    Good AD which demonstrates TSS is the Charles Atlas, kick sand in face, turns 98 pound weaking into a HE MAN, and makes the girls swoon.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11635012].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Tony M
      Ah, now its starting to make sense.

      The topic was in the audio program was only covered for about two minutes. Thank you!
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11635108].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Matthew Stanley
    Love Bob Bly and his works - esp his B2B stuff.

    Fun fact: I believe the oldest and most well known meaning of this is actually from Christian religious/biblical scripture - "the Miracle of Transubstantiation" is the conversion of the Eucharistic bread and wine to body and blood.

    But back to its marketing use - I think GordonJ lays the concept (which AWAI is big on) out well. Another way to think of it is just coming up with a new/more intriguing/exciting/appealing way of describing something that's not necessarily exciting. Examples abound, but here are a few:

    *In financial promos, this could be referring to gold coins as "secret money"
    *Legend has it that the discoverer of the dish known as Chilean Sea Bass re-named what was originally known as "Patagonian Tooth Fish" in order to sell it in America
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11635018].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author SARubin
    I'm not a roman catholic so I had to look up the meaning of the word.

    Based on what I just learned (over the past 5 minutes) Transubstantiation seems like just another way of putting a new spin on a common item to make it seem bigger than it is. Or finding a unique hook to repackage an old idea.

    One example that comes to mind is from a few years ago when a fat boy named Jared lost a couple hundred pounds and became a spokesman for Subway sandwiches.

    Basically, Subway took a foot long loaf of bread layered with lunch meat and cheese, and turned it into a weight loss diet.

    Might not have been miraculous but it seems to fit the definition of Transubstantiation?
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11635027].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Tony M
      You're correct. Subway also forgot to mention in the ads that Jared also WALKED OVER A MILE 5 DAYS A WEEK.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11635109].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author cristeck
        I believe one way to apply transubstantiation to a product is to use branding. Branding transforms an ordinary lap of chicken to a KFC package. It's the difference between a homemade burger and a McDonald's
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11641942].message }}
  • {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11635031].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Tony M
      Thank you for providing the link. For some reason it didn't post.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11635105].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author marciayudkin
    *Legend has it that the discoverer of the dish known as Chilean Sea Bass re-named what was originally known as "Patagonian Tooth Fish" in order to sell it in America
    Yes, that is an excellent example. A similar instance is kiwi fruit, which was originally called "Chinese gooseberries." Since they were grown in New Zealand, a woman who sold exotic fruits in North America came up with the new name, which turned a nothing item into a hot one.

    Marcia Yudkin
    Signature
    Check out Marcia Yudkin's No-Hype Marketing Academy for courses on copywriting, publicity, infomarketing, marketing plans, naming, and branding - not to mention the popular "Marketing for Introverts" course.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11635038].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Matthew Stanley
      wow - did not know that - that's a great one. I feel like there's a chance I bought a "Chinese gooseberries" supplement at some point - be ironic if I picked them up at the same store I purchased my Kiwis from...
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11635084].message }}
  • Believable miracles.
    Results beyond ken.
    You seen what was gowin'


    (drum roll)


    an' then ...




    So here is crankin' believability to the max via the medium of sum stuff might actschwlly work OK.


    You can't evah bend the trooth, but you sure can inflate the fkr.
    Signature

    Lightin' fuses is for blowin' stuff togethah.

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11635049].message }}
Avatar of Unregistered

Trending Topics