My Wife Said I Can't But Find Help Here....

by tonyna
15 replies
Thank you so much for checking out this thread.

I recently lost my job in a bank during the pandemic.
This led me to consider venturing into direct response copywriting.
I lost my Dad recently due to a health-related issue and that seemed to pull me towards alternative health niche.

Please what are your words of advice for me to get good with alternative health DR copy and to land clients please?

Is there any DR copywriting mentor in this group please? I will love and appreciate your guidance please.

Thank you very much,
#find #wife
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  • Profile picture of the author DWolfe
    If you are looking how to get started in copywriting you may want to view this thread here - https://www.warriorforum.com/copywri...-get-work.html

    As far as finding a mentor here on the forum. Spend some time reading posters profiles in this section of the forum. Be careful who you listen.
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    • Profile picture of the author tonyna
      Originally Posted by DWolfe View Post

      If you are looking how to get started in copywriting you may want to view this thread here - https://www.warriorforum.com/copywri...-get-work.html

      As far as finding a mentor here on the forum. Spend some time reading posters profiles in this section of the forum. Be careful who you listen.
      Thank you so much for your response.

      I am truly grateful.

      Are you a copywriter please?
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      • Profile picture of the author DWolfe
        Originally Posted by tonyna View Post

        Thank you so much for your response.

        I am truly grateful.

        Are you a copywriter please?
        No I'm not.
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  • Profile picture of the author Frank Donovan
    Originally Posted by tonyna View Post

    I recently lost my job in a bank during the pandemic.
    This led me to consider venturing into direct response copywriting.
    Why would working in a bank lead you to consider direct response copywriting?

    I lost my Dad recently due to a health-related issue and that seemed to pull me towards alternative health niche.
    My condolences. Sounds like you might have some relevant and helpful knowledge/experience to relate.

    Please what are your words of advice for me to get good with alternative health DR copy and to land clients please?
    Why look for clients when you have yet to build any expertise or experience in the service you're trying to sell? Wouldn't it be better to sell or promote something in the alternative health field yourself first and get good at what you do, before scouting for clients? You might even find a lucrative enough niche of your own and have no need of clients. But that would mean ridding yourself of your bank/employee mindset.
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    • Profile picture of the author tonyna
      Originally Posted by Frank Donovan View Post

      Why would working in a bank lead you to consider direct response copywriting?

      My condolences. Sounds like you might have some relevant and helpful knowledge/experience to relate.

      Why look for clients when you have yet to build any expertise or experience in the service you're trying to sell? Wouldn't it be better to sell or promote something in the alternative health field yourself first and get good at what you do, before scouting for clients? You might even find a lucative enough niche of your own and have no need of clients. But that would mean ridding yourself of your bank/employee mindset.
      Thanks for your response.

      I worked at the customer service desk while at the bank.

      I was doing some Google search on how to acquire digital skills and that when I stumbled on DR copywriting.

      I find it fascinating...and my desire and curiosity to understand it and master grew more.

      As I write this, I am reading Outrageous Advertising by Bill Glazer.

      There is tremendous power in being able to move people to buy your goods and services...adding value to their lives while changing your fortune.

      These are my thought processes.
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      • Profile picture of the author Frank Donovan
        Originally Posted by tonyna View Post

        I worked at the customer service desk while at the bank.

        I was doing some Google search on how to acquire digital skills and that when I stumbled on DR copywriting.

        I find it fascinating...and my desire and curiosity to understand it and master grew more.

        As I write this, I am reading Outrageous Advertising by Bill Glazer.

        There is tremendous power in being able to move people to buy your goods and services...adding value to their lives while changing your fortune.

        These are my thought processes.
        The principles of direct response copywriting long predate the digital age. While there's nothing wrong with studying the topic and how it might transfer to online variations such as email and web copy, my point is that until you've put that learning into practice and honed your craft with hard experience, it's just theory - you're not in any kind of valid position to take on clients.

        Pick a product or service in a niche that interests you - seems like you have some personal experience to bring to bear in alternative medicine - and sell something. Then keep selling until you get good at it.

        In time, you might be ready to sell your skills to clients. More likely, you'll be better off selling your own stuff, but that'll be your decision.
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  • Profile picture of the author Matthew Stanley
    Im sorry for your loss.

    On the mentor point, one thing that's important to always keep in mind is the opportunity cost of someone's time. A 15 minute call or three may sound inconsequential, but by definition requires someone to *not be doing something else of their choosing during that time. Which isn't to discourage you from pursuing a direct mentor - I get the appeal and value - but rather to suggest you a) continue to make good use of the many "virtual mentors" found here and elsewhere (many golden threads and guidance within these pages), and b) make sure your approach to a would-be mentor is deeply researched, and, if possible, value-additive/stimulating to them as well. Imo people generally do want to help (particularly here!) ... it just may take a different form than what one initially envisions...
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    • Profile picture of the author tonyna
      Originally Posted by Matthew Stanley View Post

      Im sorry for your loss.

      On the mentor point, one thing that's important to always keep in mind is the opportunity cost of someone's time. A 15 minute call or three may sound inconsequential, but by definition requires someone to *not be doing something else of their choosing during that time. Which isn't to discourage you from pursuing a direct mentor - I get the appeal and value - but rather to suggest you a) continue to make good use of the many "virtual mentors" found here and elsewhere (many golden threads and guidance within these pages), and b) make sure your approach to a would-be mentor is deeply researched, and, if possible, value-additive/stimulating to them as well. Imo people generally do want to help (particularly here!) ... it just may take a different form than what one initially envisions...
      Matthew,

      Thank you so much for your response.

      You are ubiquitous! I see you virtually in every thread.
      Thank you for always been so helpful. I will take heed to advice as well.

      One thing I also discovered recently about myself is that...

      I still have this employee mentality. I still somehow want to be instructed on what to do.

      A mindset that will not take me far if I am going thre route of entrepreneurship.

      I also battle with Bright Shiny Object Syndrome. I am laying myself bare because I need help.

      But I love marketing and copywriting. I know in my heart of hearts that I do.

      How can I strip myself of this employee mindset and BSO Syndrome please?

      I really want to grow and be all I can be as an entrepreneur. Thank you
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      • Profile picture of the author SARubin
        Originally Posted by tonyna View Post

        One thing I also discovered recently about myself is that...

        I still have this employee mentality.

        I also battle with Bright Shiny Object Syndrome.

        How can I strip myself of this employee mindset and BSO Syndrome please?
        Well Tonyna, I'm not sure if my story will help you overcome these things, or make you decide it's not worth it.

        But I can at least share with you how I got over the employee mindset and BSO syndrome...


        To set the scene...

        I quit my last official J-O-B about 25 years ago. I wasn't sure what I was going to do, but I knew I didn't want to spend the rest of my life working for peanuts, just to make someone else rich.

        On top of that, I had just spent 2 years in the Army followed by 7 years working at a New England sawmill, and I was all done taking orders from idiots. If I was going to work for another idiot it was going to be me [pause here for awkward laughter...]

        So off I went, headstrong and unsure what the future would bring, but cocksure that I could do it better on my own.



        Well, after about 2 years on my own (the time it took for me to blow through most of my savings) I began to realize I didn't know diddly jack squat about being an entrepreneur or running a business.

        And I knew I had to figure it out in a hurry. Otherwise I'd need to choose between finding another job... or getting really drunk and driving my car over a cliff. (and both of those options had about the same appeal to me)

        Through a bit of soul searching, and a weekend of self medication, one thing I began to realize was this...

        The people you spend most of your time with is a reflection of where your life is at, and where it's going to stay.



        A big part of my problem was that I was still hanging out with the same people I had worked with at the sawmill.

        These were my friends and I didn't want to lose them. But I also understood my life would always be a reflection of the people I associate with on a regular basis.

        If you spend most of your time hanging around with worker bees, you will never break free from the employee mentality.

        Because while I was trying to talk about running a business, they were still talking about hating the boss, or not getting paid enough, or "thank god it's Friday, now I can go drink half my paycheck away at the bar".

        It was a harsh reality and a bitter pill for me to swallow. But I had to leave most of my old friends behind if I wanted to move forward. It sucked for me but I was at a crossroads, and I had to make a choice.


        So how do you get over the employee mentality?

        You may need to get away from your peers who have nothing but an employee mentality. Because while you're trying to rise up they will pull you back down.

        Some may try to hold you back out of genuine concern for your well being. Because they truly believe a "safe job" is better than taking a risk.

        Others will pull you down because they don't want your success to be a reflection of their failure.

        Sometimes they don't do anything and you hold yourself back out of loyalty to your peers.

        Whatever the reason, you need to decide if it's worth it for you to suffer the discomfort of leaving some people you care about, behind.


        As far as how I got over the bright shiny object syndrome...

        Well, I spent tens of thousands of dollars buying shit. And one day I looked at myself in the mirror and realized I was an idiot for spending so much money on so much useless garbage... And then I stopped doing it.


        Of course I'm not saying my way is the best way for you.

        I was just sharing my story in hopes it might help you figure out your own path.

        Best of luck to you,
        Steve
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        • Profile picture of the author tonyna
          Originally Posted by SARubin View Post

          Well Tonyna, I'm not sure if my story will help you overcome these things, or make you decide it's not worth it.

          But I can at least share with you how I got over the employee mindset and BSO syndrome...


          To set the scene...

          I quit my last official J-O-B about 25 years ago. I wasn't sure what I was going to do, but I knew I didn't want to spend the rest of my life working for peanuts, just to make someone else rich.

          On top of that, I had just spent 2 years in the Army followed by 7 years working at a New England sawmill, and I was all done taking orders from idiots. If I was going to work for another idiot it was going to be me [pause here for awkward laughter...]

          So off I went, headstrong and unsure what the future would bring, but cocksure that I could do it better on my own.



          Well, after about 2 years on my own (the time it took for me to blow through most of my savings) I began to realize I didn't know diddly jack squat about being an entrepreneur or running a business.

          And I knew I had to figure it out in a hurry. Otherwise I'd need to choose between finding another job... or getting really drunk and driving my car over a cliff. (and both of those options had about the same appeal to me)

          Through a bit of soul searching, and a weekend of self medication, one thing I began to realize was this...

          The people you spend most of your time with is a reflection of where your life is at, and where it's going to stay.



          A big part of my problem was that I was still hanging out with the same people I had worked with at the sawmill.

          These were my friends and I didn't want to lose them. But I also understood my life would always be a reflection of the people I associate with on a regular basis.

          If you spend most of your time hanging around with worker bees, you will never break free from the employee mentality.

          Because while I was trying to talk about running a business, they were still talking about hating the boss, or not getting paid enough, or "thank god it's Friday, now I can go drink half my paycheck away at the bar".

          It was a harsh reality and a bitter pill for me to swallow. But I had to leave most of my old friends behind if I wanted to move forward. It sucked for me but I was at a crossroads, and I had to make a choice.


          So how do you get over the employee mentality?

          You may need to get away from your peers who have nothing but an employee mentality. Because while you're trying to rise up they will pull you back down.

          Some may try to hold you back out of genuine concern for your well being. Because they truly believe a "safe job" is better than taking a risk.

          Others will pull you down because they don't want your success to be a reflection of their failure.

          Sometimes they don't do anything and you hold yourself back out of loyalty to your peers.

          Whatever the reason, you need to decide if it's worth it for you to suffer the discomfort of leaving some people you care about, behind.


          As far as how I got over the bright shiny object syndrome...

          Well, I spent tens of thousands of dollars buying shit. And one day I looked at myself in the mirror and realized I was an idiot for spending so much money on so much useless garbage... And then I stopped doing it.


          Of course I'm not saying my way is the best way for you.

          I was just sharing my story in hopes it might help you figure out your own path.

          Best of luck to you,
          Steve
          SARubin,

          I am truly grateful for sharing your story with me.
          It accurately captures my life experience. Yes, I have wasted money buying courses. And yes, my savings are running low at the moment.

          And I surely don't want to return back to the man.

          I am making a U turn from all my negative habits and starting all over again.

          I am grateful to you for choosing to share your story with me. You could have chosen not to.
          But I am grateful you did.

          Thank you so much.
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      • Profile picture of the author Diego Aguirre
        Hi there, I diagnose you a heavy dose of Dan Pena, you can find him in yt, London Real is a channel with interesting interviews with him.
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  • Profile picture of the author Matthew Stanley
    I also battle with Bright Shiny Object Syndrome.
    Well, if it's any consolation, you're certainly not alone there. This is one of the the biggest mental blocks for many a new IM'er. Others may have more insight into how to push past it, but for me, there aren't any major shortcuts or hacks to it. I think of it as one part cousin, one part byproduct of other pernicious productivity killers like impostor syndrome, analysis paralysis, and procrastination. The main way "out" to my mind is really just to commit to doing something ... and *follow through on it*. Requires dedicated, consistent action for a "real" amount of time (I'd say at least a few months is required to actually formulate a new habit - more to acquire real skills) - as well as just accepting the fact that you'll never have comprehensive information or a perfectly thought-out strategy in advance. Just pick something to commit to (finishing a course, setting up a website, setting up a store, writing sales copy for x amount of time, selling x$ on amazon or eBay, etc), jump in, and stay focused on it...
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    • Profile picture of the author tonyna
      Originally Posted by Matthew Stanley View Post

      Well, if it's any consolation, you're certainly not alone there. This is one of the the biggest mental blocks for many a new IM'er. Others may have more insight into how to push past it, but for me, there aren't any major shortcuts or hacks to it. I think of it as one part cousin, one part byproduct of other pernicious productivity killers like impostor syndrome, analysis paralysis, and procrastination. The main way "out" to my mind is really just to commit to doing something ... and *follow through on it*. Requires dedicated, consistent action for a "real" amount of time (I'd say at least a few months is required to actually formulate a new habit - more to acquire real skills) - as well as just accepting the fact that you'll never have comprehensive information or a perfectly thought-out strategy in advance. Just pick something to commit to (finishing a course, setting up a website, setting up a store, writing sales copy for x amount of time, selling x$ on amazon or eBay, etc), jump in, and stay focused on it...
      Thank you Matthew.

      From what you said, I understand that BSO and its other cousins are habits.

      Breaking the habits and staying consistent to what I desire and work towards is the only way out.

      This gives me a fresh perspective on my challenges and working my way out of it. Thank you so much.
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  • Profile picture of the author max5ty
    Originally Posted by tonyna View Post

    Thank you so much for checking out this thread.

    I recently lost my job in a bank during the pandemic.
    This led me to consider venturing into direct response copywriting.
    I lost my Dad recently due to a health-related issue and that seemed to pull me towards alternative health niche.

    Please what are your words of advice for me to get good with alternative health DR copy and to land clients please?

    Is there any DR copywriting mentor in this group please? I will love and appreciate your guidance please.

    Thank you very much,
    Sorry to hear you lost your job...although sometimes that can be a blessing in disguise if it prompts you to discover bigger and better things...

    also very sad about your father.

    I always remind people that sometimes you still need to get a job to support yourself until you make it at what you want to do. Some get lucky and hit it big right off the bat, others (like me) can be slow learners when starting out.

    I would hope we're getting the pandemic behind us, although it's anybody's guess. I got my vaccines so I'm not sure if that's good or bad.

    I live in a little community and we haven't had it that bad... hope it continues that way.

    My favorite copywriter was/is Clayton Makepeace. One of the people he trained was Carline Anglade-Cole. She's one of the best in the Health field when it comes to copywriting. I'd suggest you get on her list and look at some of her samples.

    I don't have a connection to her as far as getting any benefit from recommending her...just saying she's good at what she does. I know she does mentor also. She's probably one of the best in the world when it comes to the health market.

    Her samples might give you loads of ideas. Plus, her emails are packed full of useful stuff.

    https://carlinecole.com/
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    • Profile picture of the author tonyna
      Originally Posted by max5ty View Post

      Sorry to hear you lost your job...although sometimes that can be a blessing in disguise if it prompts you to discover bigger and better things...

      also very sad about your father.

      I always remind people that sometimes you still need to get a job to support yourself until you make it at what you want to do. Some get lucky and hit it big right off the bat, others (like me) can be slow learners when starting out.

      I would hope we're getting the pandemic behind us, although it's anybody's guess. I got my vaccines so I'm not sure if that's good or bad.

      I live in a little community and we haven't had it that bad... hope it continues that way.

      My favorite copywriter was/is Clayton Makepeace. One of the people he trained was Carline Anglade-Cole. She's one of the best in the Health field when it comes to copywriting. I'd suggest you get on her list and look at some of her samples.

      I don't have a connection to her as far as getting any benefit from recommending her...just saying she's good at what she does. I know she does mentor also. She's probably one of the best in the world when it comes to the health market.

      Her samples might give you loads of ideas. Plus, her emails are packed full of useful stuff.

      https://carlinecole.com/
      Max5ty,

      Thank you so much, Sir.

      I am grateful you took time out to offer advice, ideas and hope to me in these critical times.

      You are actually one of the people I love reading their views and opinions on copy and marketing.

      And yes I have subscribed to Carline list. In fact, I just got her new book where she documented her journey into alternative health niche.

      She titled it: My Life as a 50+ Year-Old White Male: How a Mixed-Race Woman Stumbled Into Direct-Response Copywriting and Succeeded!

      I am reading that now.

      Once again, I appreciate you for the love. Thank you Sir
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