Why are squeeze pages usually short?

17 replies
Hi,

I always wondered about the theory behind it.
I understand why long sales letters "in general" convert better.
(they address all the possible issues the user have etc)

However, I don't understand why many squeeze pages are short.
Why not a long letter for opt-in?

I do know all the "rules" are not absolute and probably there are some long letter type opt-in pages which are doing well, but why "in general" short pages are better?

Thanks for your input in advance.
#pages #short #squeeze
  • Profile picture of the author Harlan
    It's because the people who are doing it have no clue what they are doing.

    And if they use Google PPC to drive traffic, they are in for a shock.

    The times, they are a changing.... (again).
    Signature

    Harlan D. Kilstein Ed.D.
    Free NLP Communications Course at http://www.nlpcopywriting.com
    http://overnight-copy.com
    Get Fit In Four Minuteshttp://just4minutes.com
    Learn how to build a Super Site Without SEO http://supersiteformula.com

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2204764].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
      Google's not the only game in town.

      Alex
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2204841].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author MikeHumphreys
      Originally Posted by Harlan View Post

      It's because the people who are doing it have no clue what they are doing.

      And if they use Google PPC to drive traffic, they are in for a shock.

      The times, they are a changing.... (again).

      I think a lot of marketers are overlooking the fact that if you are using a longer squeeze page, you're probably less likely to get Google slapped because you have more content on the page.

      One of my best converting squeeze pages in a non-IM niche is 5+ pages and has been converting at 60% for over 4 years.

      Of course, the only way to know for sure is to test.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2207437].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author BryansFitWorld
        Originally Posted by MikeHumphreys View Post

        I think a lot of marketers are overlooking the fact that if you are using a longer squeeze page, you're probably less likely to get Google slapped because you have more content on the page.

        One of my best converting squeeze pages in a non-IM niche is 5+ pages and has been converting at 60% for over 4 years.

        Of course, the only way to know for sure is to test.
        Wow 5 pages? I never read a 5 page opt in page before, what market would you find those?! Can you give me an example?

        I always wondered what would be best in the fitness and weight loss market.
        Signature
        Can't seem to lose weight? What If I told you that you will lose at least 5lbs of fat by next week? Find out here

        I love my Warcraft Niche Site :D
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2211635].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Jag82
      Originally Posted by Harlan View Post

      And if they use Google PPC to drive traffic, they are in for a shock.
      There's no need to bend over to Google
      just because of the quality score issue.

      If the short form squeeze page works...
      why change it just for Google?

      There are so many other traffic sources
      that can bring the same level of quality...
      at a higher volume...and at a cheaper rate
      than Google Adwords (sometimes even with
      zero competition).

      - Jag
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2207871].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Rezbi
    Originally Posted by ikuret75 View Post

    Hi,

    I always wondered about the theory behind it.
    I understand why long sales letters "in general" convert better.
    (they address all the possible issues the user have etc)

    However, I don't understand why many squeeze pages are short.
    Why not a long letter for opt-in?

    I do know all the "rules" are not absolute and probably there are some long letter type opt-in pages which are doing well, but why "in general" short pages are better?

    Thanks for your input in advance.
    I reckon it's like if someone's testicles are squeezed you'd be able to make them do anything.

    In the same vein, a squeeze page makes people sign up.

    Can I say testicle on here?

    Whoops! I said testicle twice.

    Darn, I've gone and said testicle again.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2205069].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author FiverrGuru
    Originally Posted by ikuret75 View Post

    Hi,

    I always wondered about the theory behind it.
    I understand why long sales letters "in general" convert better.
    (they address all the possible issues the user have etc)

    However, I don't understand why many squeeze pages are short.
    Why not a long letter for opt-in?

    I do know all the "rules" are not absolute and probably there are some long letter type opt-in pages which are doing well, but why "in general" short pages are better?

    Thanks for your input in advance.
    Because you're only asking them for their contact information.

    I had opt in pages that were 2-3 pages long with 1-2 pages full of copy and sometimes they outperformed the short version. Just make sure the opt in form is above the fold and everything leads to the opt in.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2205137].message }}
  • They aren't all that short, but sometimes a shorter page will work better when you split test it against a long form sales letter. It varies, but shorter pages work especially well in some particular markets.

    Really, if you think about it, it takes a lot less convincing to get someone to give over their email address than it does their hard earned money - at least in some markets.

    Hey, you have problem X and it sucks, right? Want a free answer to your problem? I'll email it to you! What is your email address?

    </crappiest squeeze page ever> but you get my point.

    The problem is, many people believe blindly that either long or short is best, and just go with it. You have to test, otherwise you'll never know!
    Signature
    Take your product from idea to profit in less than 90 days! Work with me to develop and implement a step-by-step plan for success!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2207382].message }}
  • It's genetic. Squeeze page's grandparents on both sides were short so it makes sense squeeze page should be short.

    But, to be serious, short can work wonders. Yes, Google won't like it for PPC, but if one is trying to use the same landing page for all traffic sources, one is, as they say, a fool. Create different squeeze pages for different traffic sources.

    Here's a screen shot from Google Website Optimizer for a test I have been running for a few months. 4 squeeze pages, all of them variations on an extremely short design, all traffic coming from the same ad:



    3,190 visitors to the test so far and the top page is producing over 83% conversions. It contains a headline, an image and an opt-in form. Short, sweet, to the point.

    Test and see what works for you.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2207599].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Rezbi
      Originally Posted by Kevin-VirtualProfitCenter View Post

      It's genetic. Squeeze page's grandparents on both sides were short so it makes sense squeeze page should be short.
      I get the feeling you've got a swipe file of these somewhere.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2215042].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Jag82
    Originally Posted by ikuret75 View Post

    However, I don't understand why many squeeze pages are short.
    Why not a long letter for opt-in?
    You use whatever is required to sell. Not a word more.

    In this case...there's nothing to buy.

    We are selling a "freebie" in exchange for an email.
    Not as much persuasion is needed as compared
    to selling a priced product.

    My experience is that a squeeze page with
    a good headline, a couple of enticing bullets,
    above-the-fold web form is good enough.

    Throw in images, video or audio (even exit pops)
    if you want to test for higher conversions.

    If you want to add more content...then try doing
    2 forms (one above the fold on the right side
    of the page and another below).

    As Mike said...to really find out what works - test.

    - Jag
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2207896].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author ikuret75
    Thanks guys for all the answers/inputs you gave me. I do appreciate them.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2208636].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Sarah Harvey
    A short squeeze page should be above the line, meaning the user should not have to scroll down to read anything. Well that is the theory... whether it will work in a particlar site is another thing and that is why people test different pages to see which convert better.
    Signature
    "Find the problem and provide the solution."
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2211508].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author DCromwell
      I've done some copy for a few of these and it seemed like more of a challenge to produce copy with brevity than the typical format we see around the web. I've also been seeing trends in video marketing being coupled with short squeeze page format, a tactic that a few of my clients are utilizing.

      I agree that typically these are just used for lead generation so that "sell" of it isn't as difficult. From my experience these are also typically used in a more "pop-up" style ad scenario. While the lack of content might make PPC a bit of a bear to wrestle with (Especially when it comes to cost and relevance) there are other networks that cost far less and are used more frequently for marketing with squeeze pages - Cost Per View comes to mind.

      For the record, I think they prefer to be called "vertically challenged".

      -Derk
      Signature

      We do amazing things with words - http://www.thunderbaymedia.net


      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2211593].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author mccflo99
    What it comes down to is that the barrier of entry (free) us much lower than trying to sell something. People don't need to be hard sold on the fact that they are about to get something for free. If you got them to your site in a targeted way, they are already interested. Offer them something of value, describe it briefly with a solid headline, a half dozen solid bullets, and a solid call to action.

    Chris Elliott
    Signature
    Copywriter With High Profile References...
    Click Here >>> Copywriter
    Personal Blog (Music Reviews, Bad Business, Poetry)...
    Click Here >>> http://www.ibechris.com
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2212570].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Hesaidblissfully
      I think a lot of it is just imitation. People see that opt-in pages for successful products are short, so they use the same sort of format. But it is true that you don't need as much persuading when someone's only submitting their email address versus a paid product. And the shortness helps keep the opt-in box above the fold so that it takes less "work" for people to opt in.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2212945].message }}

Trending Topics