The Most Overlooked Copywriting Skill Is...

28 replies
IMAGINATION ...

For example ... your client sells a product that will increase somebody else's
sales. So you send out an email to their list, offering to "increase their
sales"...

Well, I get tons of emails every day, making the same promise -

- so the email gets ignored by me, and probably by lots of other recipients
who are thinking the same thing.

What you NEED to capture my attention and interest is to make me go,

"Mmm... what's THIS? I just HAVE to find out... <click>"

And that, my fellow copywriting hot shots, requires creativity... which
stems from IMAGINATION.

Imagination allows you to generate fresh, new ANGLES ... to present
information and ideas in a way that allows the reader to feel they've just
had the scales fallen away from their eyes, and to say... "Wow, I never
thought of it like that!"

And that, I'll admit, is NOT EASY. Very few people teach you how to be creative.

When your inbox increasingly looks like this...

"Would you like to increase sales?"
"I'll increase your sales by 123%..."
"How to increase sales..."
"Paul, you must read this tip on increasing sales..."
"3 things you must do to increase sales TODAY..."


... then it takes IMAGINATION to come up with something that will stand
out from the crowd
, and make 'em take notice.

Yet that's what the best copywriters do.

They know how to get (and keep) attention in an IMAGINATIVE way that
makes the reader feel they're about to hear something new.

And, quite frankly, it also takes GUTS.

When your client wants to sell their product on "increasing sales, it takes
GUTS to send out an email on their behalf with the subject header,

"Paul, I think I just blew up my sister's cat..."

... but in the midst of a bunch of yawn-inducing "increase sales" emails, I
know which one would get MY attention

(I'm using email subject headers here... but this could equally be true of
sales letter headlines, etc. It takes GUTS to use a radically different
headline from everyone else.)

So how important do YOU think imagination and creativity is in the world
of copywriting? Do you think being imaginative can help or harm copy?




#copywriting #overlooked #skill
  • Profile picture of the author John_S
    Or you cheat by sending a fedex package.
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  • Profile picture of the author JasonParker
    Cool post.

    I have an email swipe file in Gmail. It's just a folder in there... sometimes I check out what subj lines made me click... and I just add them to the swipe file.

    Got the idea from Matt Bacak.

    Works well for getting your brain going on writing em.
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    • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
      Originally Posted by Paul McQuillan View Post

      I'm going to remove the copywriter hat and look at how
      I react to emails.... NOTHING is creative enough.

      I only read emails from those I have pre-qualified. I
      even removed myself from Makepeace's list. Not
      because I was bored, but because of his relentless
      promoting of products.

      To be honest, I delete a lot of 'creative' emails daily.

      I wont even touch writing email copy anymore because
      the copy plays such a small role. If the sender has not
      justified themselves, it will fail.

      I don't give a hoot what's in the subject line- somebody
      wants my money and I know it. A VERY select group
      is allowed to get my attention... and they need nothing
      creative to do it.
      Same here Paul. Got one today from a well-known marketer. The subject line was, "what a WILD ride".

      Yawn.

      Yesterday I got one from a marketer who took the time to build a relationship with me. The subject line was, "Happy Independence Day, Alex!".

      I opened it and read every word.

      Most people look at the "From:" column before they look at the "Subject:" column.

      Alex
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      • Profile picture of the author Nick Brighton
        Originally Posted by Alex Cohen View Post

        Same here Paul. Got one today from a well-known marketer. The subject line was, "what a WILD ride".

        Yawn.

        Yesterday I got one from a marketer who took the time to build a relationship with me. The subject line was, "Happy Independence Day, Alex!".

        I opened it and read every word.

        Most people look at the "From:" column before they look at the "Subject:" column.

        Alex
        I got those two emails too. Hahaha.

        I agree with Paul's reply about responding to people, not copy. Email is a very personal space (mentally.) I look who its' from and decide to open or not. Slowly, I delete based on name more and more these days, until I remember to unsub one day.

        Others I open because I know it will be interesting... I don't decide based on the subject line most times.

        But saying that, copy does play a part... IF you get the relationship / branding right in the first place.
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  • Profile picture of the author vivifoster
    awesome post! imagination and guts. even if you have the coolest idea in mind, if you don't have the guts to use it on somebody it's still useless. thanks for putting the word out!
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  • Profile picture of the author John_S
    Imagination? Ho hum.

    How about plain, old, customer research. (Not yanking out the swipe file, but getting to know the customer better).

    For example, going to a museum, and seeing a customer trying to balance an item on the rim of their tray in the cafeteria, suggesting a larger tray, and seeing an instant boost in business.

    Having a truly disastrous retail product (shaving mugs) selling about nothing, going to barber shops and finding out customers demand "professional tools for shaving" and turning that into the USP for an easily defined, barber shop market as a business building tool.

    Applied imagination -- creativity in work clothes -- perhaps. But methinks the imagination thing is trite, pulling stuff out your ***, let's throw in a cheap gimmick thinking.

    We need a lot less "Oh man, I can put my whole letter in my headline!!!!" yellow-highlighter imagination, and more innovative customer insights. Less rat-like cunning, and more human intelligence.
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  • Profile picture of the author perryny
    Don't dismiss the tested and proven.

    I was always puzzled by all the "Frankly, I'm puzzled" emails I got... until I added one to my autoresponder series. That one gets the most response by a wide margin.

    Yesterday I got three "Final Notices" in my inbox. I did a search and found I have 19 of them in the past 11 months (and I'm not on that many lists). Darn tootin I'm gonna have one of those when I do my product launch.

    When I'm talking with customers (the ones who already paid me for something), I talk with them. Emails are conversational and have a direct purpose. They have every reason to open my emails.

    But if I'm going out to my opt-in list... If a subject line worked for someone else, I'm trying it.
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    • Profile picture of the author Daniel Scott
      Originally Posted by perryny View Post

      Don't dismiss the tested and proven.

      I was always puzzled by all the "Frankly, I'm puzzled" emails I got... until I added one to my autoresponder series. That one gets the most response by a wide margin.

      Yesterday I got three "Final Notices" in my inbox. I did a search and found I have 19 of them in the past 11 months (and I'm not on that many lists). Darn tootin I'm gonna have one of those when I do my product launch.

      When I'm talking with customers (the ones who already paid me for something), I talk with them. Emails are conversational and have a direct purpose. They have every reason to open my emails.

      But if I'm going out to my opt-in list... If a subject line worked for someone else, I'm trying it.
      Of course... some things are copied because "Guru A" did it... and now everyone copies him. It may not have been essential... or even effective in the first place.

      Sounds crazy, right?

      Trust me - you'd be amazed at the amount of big guys who don't even bother to test.

      The other factor is that the new and different tends to get more attention/response than what people are used to (probably why those PowerPoint sales letters are raking it in at the moment).

      A market (and hence its response to marketing stimuli) is a fluid, changing thing - it's not static. What works today may not work tomorrow.

      I think in addition to copying/swiping the wording... try and figure out why it works and swipe the psychological PRINCIPLE behind it.

      You're a sharp guy, Perry, and you probably already know all this. But just thought I'd mention it.

      -Dan
      Signature

      Always looking for badass direct-response copywriters. PM me if we don't know each other and you're looking for work.

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      • Profile picture of the author perryny
        Originally Posted by Daniel Scott View Post

        Of course... some things are copied because "Guru A" did it... and now everyone copies him. It may not have been essential... or even effective in the first place.

        Sounds crazy, right?

        Trust me - you'd be amazed at the amount of big guys who don't even bother to test.

        The other factor is that the new and different tends to get more attention/response than what people are used to (probably why those PowerPoint sales letters are raking it in at the moment).

        A market (and hence its response to marketing stimuli) is a fluid, changing thing - it's not static. What works today may not work tomorrow.

        I think in addition to copying/swiping the wording... try and figure out why it works and swipe the psychological PRINCIPLE behind it.

        You're a sharp guy, Perry, and you probably already know all this. But just thought I'd mention it.

        -Dan
        Hey Dan,

        Thanks for the compliment.

        With my limited experience, right now I kinda follow the gurus pretty blindly. Mind you, it's a pretty small group of widely respected gurus.

        So when the guru tells me to use the subject line "Frankly, I'm Puzzled", even though I personally don't believe it's something I'd respond to, I'll test it anyway.

        If I saw that people were opting out of my list after getting this email, I'd change it. But in this case, the gurus are right and this is the email that I receive the greatest response to.

        I'll change it when it stops working, or when I find something that works better.

        I also heard something recently... I think it was Bencivenga in an interview saying that creative headlines, when they work, can result in an amazing home run. But be aware that they only have a 25% chance of beating a benefit driven headline. So If you want to be creative, you'd be smart to split-test (His words, not mine. And I'm paraphrasing... badly. But the 25% statistic is correct).

        I'm getting involved here in a thread I really have no business being in. You copywriters that know the "rules" should be plenty qualified to take something that you know should work, inject some creativity into it and be able to improve upon it.

        For someone like me with no experience, I think trying to be creative is something that should be reserved as an "advanced" tactic.
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  • Profile picture of the author Daniel Sanchez
    Today for one fo the first times ever I actually responded to an email.

    Fortin and it said
    "I quit"

    Yeesh that hooked me good.

    When I do open and email from marketer frankly it's an amazing experience because nothing short of a gun to my head will get me to open an email anymore.
    Signature

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  • Profile picture of the author Paul Hancox
    Hey Folks

    Originally Posted by Alex Cohen

    Yesterday I got one from a marketer who took the time to build a relationship with me. The subject line was, "Happy Independence Day, Alex!".

    I opened it and read every word.

    Most people look at the "From:" column before they look at the "Subject:" column.
    This is a very valid point, Alex... and for email I absolutely agree the "From:" column
    is more important than the "Subject:" columnn.

    However, speaking personally, if I knew the "From:" column was from a broadcast
    email (i.e. a newsletter), the "Happy Independence Day, Paul!" subject would
    probably NOT get me to open it... I'd simply think, "That's nice... marketer X is
    sending his greetings to all his subscribers".

    No need to open it.

    But that's just me. (I know it's dangerous extrapolating the behaviour of a market
    from the way I behave.)

    Originally Posted by John__S

    We need a lot less "Oh man, I can put my whole letter in my headline!!!!" yellow-highlighter imagination, and more innovative customer insights. Less rat-like cunning, and more human intelligence.
    Absolutely... but I guess that's my point. "Whole letter in my headline" thinking is NOT creative.

    Actually, it's lazy. It may work... but it's still lazy if it's NOT the optimal headline.

    More "innovative customer insights" LEADS TO more creative and imaginative ways of getting their attention and interest.

    Originally Posted by perryny

    With my limited experience, right now I kinda follow the gurus pretty blindly. Mind you, it's a pretty small group of widely respected gurus.
    Nothing wrong with following the gurus blindly... but you have to keep in mind the critical difference:

    The follower is NOT the guru. The guru can often pull off things that the follower cannot.

    That's WHY one is the guru, and the other is the follower

    Originally Posted by Paul McQuillan

    The mundane is overrated someone says? Creativity
    is just, if not more overrated and done poorly most times.

    Put some elbow grease into building the relationship and
    such trickery is not needed.
    I agree that "building the relationship" is the most IMPORTANT thing, when it comes to emails.

    I guess, because I used the example of email, this thread has focused on getting attention in marketing.

    But I was really talking about imagination for copywriters in general.

    For someone with a list, how many "Happy [insert latest holiday], Paul!" emails is going to SUSTAIN your attention?

    Speaking personally, if it came from a broadcast list I probably wouldn't open this... the subject line says it all... Guru X wants to wish me a happy holiday... that's nice of him!

    Yes, if I knew that person was emailing me PERSONALLY, I'd open it. (But how many with a LIST write to each subscriber personally?)

    On the other hand, I WOULD open something if it promised to reveal something NEW, INTERESTING and RELEVANT to me.

    And quite frankly, that would be a challenge ...

    ... which would require... IMAGINATION.

    Of course, I realize I'm not typical ... I'm super-fussy about who I let into my email box as well... I even have a separate email account for newsletters ... keeps my personal account much less cluttered.

    So if Guru X wanted to get YOUR attention, yes they'd need to build a relationship with you... but given they'd still most likely use broadcast email... I think it would take something much more than "Happy [insert latest holiday], Paul!" to get YOU to click.

    It would take... imagination.

    Building a relationship takes imagination. Think of a marriage, for example ... sometimes you have to inject a little imagination and creativity there, to keep it going.

    "Building a relationship" keeps you on their list. But a little imagination keeps the relationship strong.
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  • Profile picture of the author Daniel Sanchez
    Here's a personal observation.

    I notice when I suspect someone is trying to get my attention, I shut down.

    Emails especially.

    But when I see something that doesn't seem like them trying to get my attention AND get my curiostity going (aka captures my imagination)...

    I just might read it.

    And sometimes I'm pleasantly surprised.


    It take imagination to capture my imagination
    Signature

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    • Profile picture of the author Nick Brighton
      in reference to Michael Fortin's email about
      him quitting smoking:


      Originally Posted by Paul McQuillan View Post

      Hooked me too, but I read Michael's emails anyway. He
      fell short on hiding his link. Once I noticed 'smoking' in the
      link, I deleted it.

      I don't care if he quit smoking, but the subject line was
      good because it was from someone I would care about
      if they 'quit' (of course I am thinking his business)
      I got that one too. The problem and danger of using such
      an approach can be boiled down to 5 words:

      THE BOY WHO CRIED WOLF

      It can happen to the best of 'em.
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    • Profile picture of the author RentItNow
      Originally Posted by Danniboy View Post

      Here's a personal observation.

      I notice when I suspect someone is trying to get my attention, I shut down.

      Emails especially.

      But when I see something that doesn't seem like them trying to get my attention AND get my curiostity going (aka captures my imagination)...

      I just might read it.

      And sometimes I'm pleasantly surprised.


      It take imagination to capture my imagination
      I second this. I recently got two emails from a guy's recently subscribed list that were titled "WARNING." and "Private". Ok, I admit I opened them but it p!ssed me off enough to unsubscribe.
      Signature
      I have no agenda but to help those in the same situation. This I feel will pay the bills.
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  • Profile picture of the author MichelFortin
    One of my favorite shows is Billy The Exterminator on the Discovery Channel. It's a reality TV show that follows the antics and jobs of an eccentric yet humane exterminator.

    Each time Billy is called to a scene, and as soon as he finds the vermin or insect he needs to get rid of, he screams "Oh, Maaaan!", the show fades to black, and they cut to a commercial.

    You're left wondering, "Oh, my! I wonder what he found?!?!"

    (After the commercial, we realize it wasn't anything shocking. Well, not most of the time, anyway. But cutting to a commercial that way, it does make you wonder, "What? What happened? What did he find?" And you're left glued to the TV to find out what he found.)

    On the game show "Minute to Win It," each time a contestant is about to perform the seemingly impossible contest, especially when the prize (and the risk) is significant, a disembodied voice counts down: "3... 2... 1... <buzz!>" And they cut straight to a commercial.

    In both of the above situations, it happens almost on every show. Yes, practically every show! And it still gets me every time.

    This is NOT trickery. Not in my mind, anyway. What I consider trickery is only if it's:
    1. totally irrelevant, or
    2. an outright lie.
    I don't advocate either one of these.

    For example, as for #1, irrelevancy, we all know of that famous (or better said, infamous) ad where the headline says, in big, bold letters, the word "SEX!" And then the first paragraph in the ad says, "Now that I've got your attention, here's my offer..."

    It's not a lie. But it's completely irrelevant. And therefore, it's misleading.

    In the case of #2, where the headline is completely false, making an outright lie for the sole purpose of getting you to read and respond to the ad is misleading in the purest sense.

    Why? Because the problem is, this will backfire. People will assume that, if you're willing to tell a lie to get their attention, how honest are you going to be about your product?

    I saw an example of this just recently.

    I received an email from a marketer who stated in the headline that he was dying. Yes, literally "I'm dying!" (The body copy said something along the lines of "... to tell you about this ad").

    Now, that's trickery. Because saying you're dying is a complete statement in and of itself. Saying an incomplete statement is different because you're forcing people to read the rest to complete the idea.

    But a complete statement, left alone, makes it a lie. Specifically, saying "I'm dying" means exactly what it says. And it's wrong. This is manipulation, in my estimation.

    Here's where I define as "trickery." ("Trickery" in the negative sense.)

    If the email came in blank for whatever reason (say some technical glitch), saying "I quit" is incomplete and you're scrambling to find out what I did quit. But saying "I'm dying" and the email is blank, that headline can stand on its own, and it's making a pretty serious claim -- you're manipulating people and their emotions.

    But in my case, and in my defense, I did tell the truth. It was incomplete, and therefore it's forcing you to read the ad to find the rest of the statement. But it is nonetheless the truth.

    That's the Zeigarnik Effect in action, because it forced you to find out what exactly did I quit.

    If I outright said "I quit smoking," I don't think I'd get as much flak. But if I did, I've basically given you the store. I told the whole story. I have nothing left for you to read. And in copywriting, you should NEVER tell the entire story in the headline. Never.

    The headline's job is one thing: to get you the read. (That's why I'm also against massive, tell-all, mega-headlines that give away the entire farm.)

    So telling the whole story doesn't make sense. I could have said, "I quit this bad habit." Sure, that might be better. But I posit that not a lot of people would wonder "What habit?" Either that or they wouldn't care.

    I was close to writing something like that, but the headline was too long (at least as an email subject line). I wanted something short and sweet. I wanted to be as efficient as possible, especially with email where time is crucial.

    I know some of you won't agree with me. And that's fine because "trickery" is very subjective. Even though I didn't use "trickery," at least not in the negative sense, the word itself can conjure negative opinions for some people.

    But a magic show uses trickery... just like Billy The Exterminator TV show I mentioned earlier uses trickery. But is it truly negative? Incomplete? Yes. Sensational? Maybe. But I don't think it was negative.

    By the way, here's an article I recommend from Clayton Makepeace:

    "For Sale: Dead Puppies"

    How to have the right mindset to be a salesman in print | The Total Package

    EDITED TO ADD: Another form of trickery I despise is when the email subject line says "Personal" when obviously it's not. That's a lie. How can it be personal when it's mass-mailed?
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    Michel Fortin
    We Solve Inbox Overwhelm
    CEO, Workaholics4Hire.com, Inc.
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  • Profile picture of the author cjp231
    The Most Overlooked Copywritting skill is....One's Ability/Discipline to Research
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  • Profile picture of the author Domenic Carlson
    Judging from what I see, the most overlooked skill is the ability to be concise. So many of these copy laden websites just go on and on and on with these marathon pitches. Sometimes you can say much more with far fewer words.
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    Always interested in news about Bing, SEO, SEM Internet Marketing and Search Engine Optimization.

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    • Profile picture of the author Lance K
      Michel, thanks for your in depth post.

      I got your "I quit" email as well. And I opened it because I was curious. When I read the meat, I thought it was a little corny and a bit of a let down.

      BUT...

      That's probably because of all the other tricky, sensational, or whatever you want to call them email subjects I get from other marketers. However, this wasn't a shameless plug email. Sure you worked your affiliate link for the vapor cigarette into the story, but I didn't get the feeling that you mass mailed your marketing/copywriting list to sell vapor cigarettes.

      You mailed to share a personal story. And once the initial "letdown" reaction to the relationship between what I thought your subject line implied and what it really meant, I found the story to be a refreshing change of pace. Had you said you quit doing PPC and plugged an SEO type product, etc. that would be a different story.

      Hope that makes sense. And again, thanks for sharing your insights on this topic.
      Signature
      "You can have everything in life you want if you will just help enough other people get what they want."
      ~ Zig Ziglar
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  • Profile picture of the author Scootek
    I think writing needs character. I believe this is important element of copywriting. You can tell a fair amount about an individual from their writing. Although, like many businesses (we are also guilty) of writing boring waffle, I think people prefer to read things that feel personal. I am coming from a small business angle.
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    If you can help me SEO suggestions...then it will be appreciated...

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  • Profile picture of the author opiniones
    definitely a good tip that is often forgotten.
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  • Profile picture of the author alsmith1
    This is a touchy subject with me, although some subject lines are very compelling, I can spot a sales pitch instantly as can most people, personally if I know the sender and am impressed with him/her I may open it and see what they have to say, otherwise I delete it. I believe a lot of marketers(Guru's included) try to sell way too often and give real value too seldom and I think some of the hyped up sales pitches that you know can't be true are insulting in a way. I believe if you tone down the sales pitch and explain the value your product has to offer and even build trust by giving away something of value to the customer that you will have a customer for life as long as you maintain the relationship on an even keel. The minute you start saying or writing something that you can't back up, you are putting this relationship on shaky ground at best. So, I think honesty and straightforward talk are the most overlooked copywriting skills. This is my opinion from personal experience.
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  • Profile picture of the author yachi
    Great Post...Imagination and creativity definitely play an important role in today's world of copywriting. If your imagination can go to any extreme then it will surely be helpful.
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    • Profile picture of the author wordwizard
      Originally Posted by perryny View Post

      Don't dismiss the tested and proven.

      I was always puzzled by all the "Frankly, I'm puzzled" emails I got... until I added one to my autoresponder series. That one gets the most response by a wide margin.

      Yesterday I got three "Final Notices" in my inbox. I did a search and found I have 19 of them in the past 11 months (and I'm not on that many lists). Darn tootin I'm gonna have one of those when I do my product launch.

      When I'm talking with customers (the ones who already paid me for something), I talk with them. Emails are conversational and have a direct purpose. They have every reason to open my emails.

      But if I'm going out to my opt-in list... If a subject line worked for someone else, I'm trying it.
      Well, I've gotten enough "Frankly I'm puzzled" emails that I can pretty much tell by heart what's going to be in it (i.e., why you haven't signed up for whatever blah blah blah..)

      But if it works... maybe I should give it a shot sometime and see what happens.

      Ditto the Final Notice thing.

      But after having tried out Frank Kern's 4 day cash machine and had about a .01% conversion rate, plus numerous unsubscribes, I'm going to be wary...

      One of my pet peeve email subject lines... "You Up?" or just "Up?"

      and no matter the title, if the following command appears inside "Check this" plus link,
      I program the senders of those emails to bypass my inbox directly to my swipe file...

      Elisabeth
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  • Profile picture of the author Karate Kid
    Imagination... the treasure all of us used to have as a kid and a victim of maturation...

    when we're writing copies... let's think like a little kid again!
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  • Profile picture of the author Saladin
    I actually do believe in the world of magic pills we live in and the incredible hype that never ends , Truth is truly the ultimate sales tool , Noting beats honesty , directness & being straightforward .

    All the subliminal persuasion & hypnosis in my opinion isn't that good for long term , And is manipulative as well , People are stupid enough to buy into one magic pill to the next and become cynical yet still go after the dream , A real marketer is someone that doesn't look like a marketer and he doesn't sell , He tells it the way it truly is and still achieves great results short term & long term .
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  • Profile picture of the author Paul Hancox
    Hi Saladin

    I understand the thrust of what you're saying ... trouble is, people WANT magic pills, fast solutions and quick fixes.

    Imagine if marketers really told it the way it is.

    "Hey, buy this get slim ebook. It contains all the advice you'll need to actually get slim, but guess what.. there's a 97% chance you won't use it ... you'll read a chapter, not bother to implement it because you're too lazy and you prefer to DREAM about being slim rather than put in the darned effort ... still be fat in a month or so ... and then you'll be on the lookout for the NEXT best get slim ebook ... all the while probably GAINING a few pounds, making your next ebook purchase even easier.

    That's the honest truth, buy now. $19.95."


    Do you think marketers should tell it EXACTLY the way it is ... ?
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  • Profile picture of the author Saladin
    I thought exactly the same a long while ago not only regarding copy writing but also regarding dating being indirect just like all sales letter are like .

    But it turns out you just attract tons of people with such a thing and not the type of people you want at ALL , And you end up frustrated with the results ,But obviously the one that applies that deserves it coz he wasn't honest with them from the start .

    If you're radically honest with people they like it , They love being kicked in the butt and awakened , No body does that unless he knows what he's talking about, It either pisses them off or they LOVE it coz it's a breath of fresh air , And the marketer is honest & truthful which is probably incredibly rare , Which of course provides an element of controversy even though it's truthful .

    Now it doesn't have to be like the way you mentioned it , The problem with people not taking action is the lack of research of most of these people that make these products , Almost none talks about the mindset & beliefs which is the most important thing in doing almost anything in life , And they just get into Copycat mode , Telling them how they did it and ignoring the fact that these people are different .

    Not including the fact that most of these products are made up mostly of research not true life experiences , This is why they sell it so cheap and on a long term basis it sucks .

    If there's one book that really drives that point home with incredible example it's "No Lie : Truth is the Ultimate Sales Tool" which you can read here on google :

    books.google.com.eg/books?id=-bk2FjXFHq4C&printsec=frontcover&dq=truth+is+the+ul timate+sales+tool&source=bl&ots=EkLrXoS3nj&sig=tza XE1rpo_YWEDlgxSkh5x5sG0E&hl=en&ei=1V9KTNeMEIiCOITs uZYD&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=3&ved=0C B4Q6AEwAg#v=onepage&q&f=false

    You'll find inside some examples that are nuggets of GOLD , Saying the absolute truth and still getting SO MUCH money for it , This is marketing at its best , Effortless .

    And "Radical Honesty" is also amazing .
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  • Profile picture of the author Daniel Marshall
    Banned
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    • Profile picture of the author Grain
      Daniel Marshall, don't spam the thread, it's a pretty
      fabulous one.

      Thanks for the bump Mark, I'm pretty new to the
      WF and it's really amazing seeing great discussions
      from old threads.

      I love the insights about email marketing on this
      one.

      Kind Regards,
      Grain.
      Signature

      Kind Regards,
      Grain.

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