Writing Hot Copy Before A Product is Released

7 replies
Most of us warriors create a product then write a sales letter because "that's what you need to sell a product". I've done that in the past and believe it's a prehistoric, inferior way of writing copy and creating a great product mostly because the bullets are limited to what's in the product.

I'm looking for a copywriter who can write a great letter without the product. It makes sense the offer will sizzle more than if the letter was written first.

I've never done this before so what's a copywriter need for such a project? I know the problems the products will solve (one of the markets is in relationships) and have many of my competitor's sales letters that I've tested for conversions. I'm already successfully selling other people's courses.

Does it interest you more writing copy this way because you're not confined to a product already created? Surely it must be exhilarating to allow your creative mind the freedom to craft the ideal product. One warrior in another thread said "I know when I write some of my sales letters I end up thinking, 'Man I wish I would have put this in [insert product name] because it is one heck of a selling point.'"
#copy #hot #product #released #writing
  • Profile picture of the author Hugh Thyer
    My understanding is it's illegal in the US, but may not be in Australia.

    A lot of people, particularly offline create the marketing then get the product to market quickly. They'll do this by writing the sales copy and using it as the outline for the product. Then if they get sales they'll fill in the gaps to put the product together. If not, they'll blame a 'production problem', refund the money and promise to given them a better deal once the production problems are fixed.

    Right? Ethical? Up to you to decide. I know people who have done it.

    So before you can write the sales copy you need a thorough understanding of what your target market really wants. What are the big problems they want to solve? What are their burning questions? You can do this with a Surveymonkey campaign. Talk to your prospects. Get inside their heads.

    This should be done before creating a product anyway!

    Once you've done this, you simply write your sales copy to address the answers. Describe the problem your prospects have already described to you. Create an irresistible offer that gives them what they want. Tell them how you solve all the problems they have.

    A copywriter only needs the product to know what it delivers to the prospect. If you start with a blank page, you just work backwards. It's easier to write the sales copy first because you write directly to the prospect and you're not limited by the product. And then your product can deliver everything the prospect wants, so it's far more powerful.

    And of course, make sure your product can deliver what you promise.

    If you want a hand with it, feel free to PM me.

    Hugh
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    Ever wondered how copywriters work with their clients? I've answered that very question in detail-> www.salescomefirst.com
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    • Profile picture of the author Joshua Uebergang
      You brought up a concern I never thought of, Hugh. I have no intention to make the copy "live" or promote it until the product is completed. Glad that is cleared up early.

      I know some marketers put up a test letter then track "false orders" to see if the market converts, but I already know the market converts because I'm successfully selling my competitor's products.

      A survey is a good idea that I should still use even if I think I understand the market.

      I know some copywriters go thoroughly through a product (of which they likely have no interest in) to pull out bullet points. Must be a pain in the ass.
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      • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
        Originally Posted by Joshua Uebergang View Post

        A survey is a good idea that I should still use even if I think I understand the market.
        Yeah, even great copywriters survey their customers and followers.

        John Carlton did it for his Simple Writing System

        Frank Kern did it for his Mass List Control

        Bob Serling regularly outlines a draft for a training program and asks his subscribers if there would be any interest

        Drayton Bird has recently done it to see if there was interest in him running a telesimnar, then a live event at a posh hotel.

        Saves the mis-firings and anguish when wondering why something didn't work.

        All the best,
        Ewen
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  • Profile picture of the author Harlan
    Originally Posted by Joshua Uebergang View Post

    Most of us warriors create a product then write a sales letter because "that's what you need to sell a product". I've done that in the past and believe it's a prehistoric, inferior way of writing copy and creating a great product mostly because the bullets are limited to what's in the product.

    I'm looking for a copywriter who can write a great letter without the product. It makes sense the offer will sizzle more than if the letter was written first.

    I've never done this before so what's a copywriter need for such a project? I know the problems the products will solve (one of the markets is in relationships) and have many of my competitor's sales letters that I've tested for conversions. I'm already successfully selling other people's courses.

    Does it interest you more writing copy this way because you're not confined to a product already created? Surely it must be exhilarating to allow your creative mind the freedom to craft the ideal product. One warrior in another thread said "I know when I write some of my sales letters I end up thinking, 'Man I wish I would have put this in [insert product name] because it is one heck of a selling point.'"
    I wrote most of my sales letters before the product is created.

    Than I use the sales letter as the blueprint for product creation.

    I do the same with seminar preparation as well.
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    Harlan D. Kilstein Ed.D.
    Free NLP Communications Course at http://www.nlpcopywriting.com
    http://overnight-copy.com
    Get Fit In Four Minuteshttp://just4minutes.com
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    • Profile picture of the author Rezbi
      Originally Posted by Harlan View Post

      I wrote most of my sales letters before the product is created.

      Than I use the sales letter as the blueprint for product creation.

      I do the same with seminar preparation as well.
      Most of the top guys I know of do this.

      I know of one guy who wrote the copy, made sales and then created the product based on demand.

      I think that's a great way of doing things and I might start doing it myself.
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      • Profile picture of the author Harlan
        Originally Posted by Rezbi View Post

        Most of the top guys I know of do this.

        I know of one guy who wrote the copy, made sales and then created the product based on demand.

        I think that's a great way of doing things and I might start doing it myself.
        If I do it for a seminar, I use the sales letter during the seminar to make sure I'm delivering what I promised.

        You'd be surprised how many people follow your sales letters to see if you have delivered as promised.
        Signature

        Harlan D. Kilstein Ed.D.
        Free NLP Communications Course at http://www.nlpcopywriting.com
        http://overnight-copy.com
        Get Fit In Four Minuteshttp://just4minutes.com
        Learn how to build a Super Site Without SEO http://supersiteformula.com

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  • Profile picture of the author travlinguy
    Think of what you want in your offer. Get excited about how good you want the product to be. Examine lots of similar products with an eye to making yours stand out. Take lots of notes as ideas come to you. Make an outline. Develop the outline. When you're ready, start writing your sales page.

    Just write at first. Don't worry about proofing. Get all your ideas out there. After you're confident that you've got the ideal product, polish the letter. Then create the product using the letter as your guide.

    I did my first two products this way years ago and they have been among my best sellers. I come across questions on the main board from time to time about the best approach to creating a great product. My contribution is always something similar to what I've written above. It adds a lot of enthusiasm to your approach to both your product and your copy.
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