What's the "exit strategy" for a Copywriter?

by Dexx
43 replies
Hey gang,

I''ve been able to successfully get some momentum in securing copywriting clients, but now that I have a couple, I'm realizing how truly time consuming doing proper research, and providing compelling copy, can be for each client.

Luckily I am also local business marketing strategies as well (for the bulk of my marketing-based income), but I'm wondering, what is the typical "exit strategy" for someone who does actually build a full-time income off of copywriting?

What happens when you've been doing it for 10, 15, or 20 years and then decide to pack up your copywriting business?

Since the income is mainly dependent on you doing the work (not sure how many copywriters sub-contract their clients out to other copywriters), how do you truly "retire" as a copywriter.

Is that where having contracts that include a percentage of profits come in to play? So that you continue earning revenue long after you stop writing copy?

Or what would be the next step?

Information products? Create your own coaching program and teach other copywriters for a monthly continuity, etc.

Just curious what the thoughts are of some of the more veteran copywriters here in terms of what their "end goal" would be...

~Dexx
#copywriter #exit strategy
  • Profile picture of the author travlinguy
    You mentioned it. Create your own products and write your own copy. There are different levels to this. I was writing landing pages for affiliate marketers and they were getting great results. One guy told me he made three $125 sales in two weeks with one of my landing pages.

    Duh. I said to myself. Hmmm... Write for people, get paid once. Write for me, get paid many times. Simple.

    That's just one way to go. You mention coaching. I've done some of that and it can be very draining and demanding. Too intense for me. I like to write so I'll stick to that.
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    • Profile picture of the author marciayudkin
      Dexx,

      Most copywriters I know who have been doing it for 20+ years, enjoy the process too much to give it up entirely. What they tend to do is to pick and choose their projects more stringently so they're working only as hard as they want to and no more, and only on projects that interest them, for people they like.

      That's been my own approach lately. I'm on the way to semi-retirement.

      I have been working on my own for 30 years now. Copywriting is not the only thing I do, but it's a vital part of the mix.

      Marcia Yudkin
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      • Profile picture of the author RickDuris
        No self-respecting copywriter would ever, in a billion years, think that thought.

        That's why Ted Nicholas, at 90+ years young, is still writing and teaching copy.

        That's why 80 something year-old pastor Robert Schueller of the Crystal Cathedal here in Garden Grove is still writing sermons and books.

        That's why Jim Rohn was still doing his seminars up until the day he died.

        That's why Jimmy Carter, like him or not, is still trying to get people to communicate. Same goes for Bill Clinton and Jesse Jackson. [Note: Please be respectful and do not turn this thread political or religious at all. Come up with your own examples, if you must.]

        That's why the Rolling Stones, Elton John, Cher, Barry Manilow, AeroSmith, and REO Speedwagon, Styx, Tina Turner and even magician David Copperfield are still touring.

        They can't stop it. Or shut it off. There's too much of a rush when you are doing your best work.

        For people of this caliber and quality, there is no "exit strategy."

        They were "born this way" to paraphrase Lady Gaga.

        All're gonna die with their boots on. Toes pointed up.

        - Rick Duris
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        • Profile picture of the author PMinc
          Originally Posted by RickDuris View Post

          No self-respecting copywriter would ever, in a billion years, think that thought.

          That's why Ted Nicholas, at 90+ years young, is still writing and teaching copy.

          That's why 80 something year-old pastor Robert Schueller of the Crystal Cathedal here in Garden Grove is still writing sermons and books.

          That's why Jim Rohn was still doing his seminars up until the day he died.

          That's why Jimmy Carter, like him or not, is still trying to get people to communicate. Same goes for Bill Clinton and Jesse Jackson. [Note: Please be respectful and do not turn this thread political or religious at all. Come up with your own examples, if you must.]

          That's why the Rolling Stones, Elton John, Cher, Barry Manilow, AeroSmith, and REO Speedwagon, Styx, Tina Turner and even magician David Copperfield are still touring.

          They can't stop it. Or shut it off. There's too much of a rush when you are doing your best work.

          For people of this caliber and quality, there is no "exit strategy."

          They were "born this way" to paraphrase Lady Gaga.

          All're gonna die with their boots on. Toes pointed up.

          - Rick Duris
          Couldn't agree more. Herschell Gordon Lewis can't pull himself away from the trade either...who can blame him?
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          • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
            No self-respecting copywriter would ever, in a billion years, think that thought.
            Don't believe it Dexx. For every "self-respecting" copywriter who can't give it up, there's plenty who can... and do so happily.

            Alex
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            • Profile picture of the author MikeHumphreys
              Originally Posted by Alex Cohen View Post

              Don't believe it Dexx. For every "self-respecting" copywriter who can't give it up, there's plenty who can... and do so happily.

              Alex
              Alex,

              You can take a broad view at any niche and point out the struggling or burnt out people who are ready to quit.

              You can take a broad view in any niche and point out the people who can't wait to reach retirement age so they can "retire".

              Rick mentioned people who are considered to be the best (or among the best) in their area of expertise. People who are driven to keep doing what they love. They aren't doing it strictly for the money. They're doing it because they love what they do and it doesn't feel like WORK to them.

              People who love what they do... they don't look forward to retiring. People who love what they do want to keep doing for as long as they possibly can.

              My 3 cents,

              Mike
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  • Profile picture of the author Dexx
    Great post Rick!

    I thought Clayton Makepeace retired from copywriting though?

    The reason I ask is as a result of re-reading the E-Myth by Michael G. and he states that many business owners end up burning themselves out because their entire business is built on them doing the work...if they don't work...they don't make money. Working on the business vs in it, etc.

    So it got me thinking how to move from the "The Technician" role into something else in the future (should I ever decide to).

    ~Dexx
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    • Profile picture of the author RickDuris
      Originally Posted by Dexx View Post

      Great post Rick!

      I thought Clayton Makepeace retired from copywriting though?

      The reason I ask is as a result of re-reading the E-Myth by Michael G. and he states that many business owners end up burning themselves out because their entire business is built on them doing the work...if they don't work...they don't make money. Working on the business vs in it, etc.

      So it got me thinking how to move from the "The Technician" role into something else in the future (should I ever decide to).

      ~Dexx
      Let me ask you a question, Dexx. And it's a sincere one.

      What do you think Clayton and Michael are doing today?

      With the utmost of respect, I rest my case.

      - Rick Duris
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  • Profile picture of the author vvsingh
    You can start your own firm whether you can bring copy writing business and get it written by your employees. Make sure you maintain great standards and keep a check on the quality of the contents.
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    • Profile picture of the author Dexx
      Originally Posted by vvsingh View Post

      You can start your own firm whether you can bring copy writing business and get it written by your employees. Make sure you maintain great standards and keep a check on the quality of the contents.
      I'm actually thinking this is something I'd probably end up doing. Establishing an agency of sorts and utilizing a network of freelancers.

      ~Dexx
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  • Profile picture of the author lemonarian
    To follow up on some of the thoughts Rick started above... if you're in the game for the love of the game... you'll find a way to keep writing. Even if that just ends up being writing crappy mystery novels on lazy sunday afternoons.

    And, if you're a top copywriter... generating income will be the least of your concerns. Savvy business owners will be lining up at your doorstep, and pay handsomely for just a single nugget of wisdom.
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    • Profile picture of the author Dexx
      Originally Posted by lemonarian View Post

      And, if you're a top copywriter... generating income will be the least of your concerns. Savvy business owners will be lining up at your doorstep, and pay handsomely for just a single nugget of wisdom.
      Very good point!

      Copywriting is basically a licence to print money...especially since you could do it from a laptop while sitting on a tropical island's beach.

      ~Dexx
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    • Profile picture of the author AdwordsMogul
      Originally Posted by lemonarian View Post


      And, if you're a top copywriter... generating income will be the least of your concerns. Savvy business owners will be lining up at your doorstep, and pay handsomely for just a single nugget of wisdom.
      That would be true in a perfect world. But it isn't.

      Such an assumption could be the deadliest financial mistake of your life.

      If you wanna write copy for the rest of your life... that's fine.

      However, you have to invest the money you get into other ventures. That's the smart thing to do.

      On one level, you have to look at copywriting as a source of capital. That capital has to grow so that you can do whatever you want with your time... including writing copy.
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      • Profile picture of the author lemonarian
        Originally Posted by AdwordsMogul View Post

        That would be true in a perfect world. But it isn't.

        Such an assumption could be the deadliest financial mistake of your life.

        If you wanna write copy for the rest of your life... that's fine.

        However, you have to invest the money you get into other ventures. That's the smart thing to do.

        On one level, you have to look at copywriting as a source of capital. That capital has to grow so that you can do whatever you want with your time... including writing copy.

        You missed my point entirely. First of all, the prerequisite to my statement was "if you're a top copywriter" - which is not true for one in a thousand...

        I'm not arguing with any of your other points.

        My point was, that if you're at the point where you have been a pro copywriter for many years... you have a very good fundamental understanding of not only copy, but marketing and business... and yes, life.

        And, a person who has those things would not have a problem generating income. Whether he chooses to do so through freelance writing or investing in real estate is a different matter altogether.
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  • Profile picture of the author kpaulmedia
    Information products and building your own web properties...
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    • Profile picture of the author RickDuris
      Originally Posted by Alex Cohen View Post

      Don't believe it Dexx. For every "self-respecting" copywriter who can't give it up, there's plenty who can... and do so happily.

      Alex
      BS, Alex.

      That's like telling BB King or Johnny Winter or Buddy Guy or Alvin Lee they can never play or sing the blues again.

      Ain't gonna happen.

      That's like telling Bob Dylan to put down his pencil. Ask him. He CAN'T.

      Or telling Keith Richards to put his guitar in the closet. You know he sleeps with his guitar, don't you?

      Exit strategy? There is none. Can't happen. It's impossible.

      No self-respecting copywriter will give up his craft without a fight.

      Not a chance in hell.

      And if he can? My opinion is he was never a copywriter in the first place. Because once you catch the bug? You can't lose it. No way. It's MRSA for marketers. Google Image MRSA. You'll see. And then you'll know.

      I stand my ground.

      Your serve, Alex. Make it good.

      - Rick Duris

      PS: I'm putting you on notice, Alex: Your reputation is at risk in your reply. Think it through before you do. I'm sincerely being respectful of your previous contributions here.
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      • Profile picture of the author AdwordsMogul
        Originally Posted by RickDuris View Post

        ...
        PS: I'm putting you on notice, Alex: Your reputation is at risk in your reply. Think it through before you do. I'm sincerely being respectful of your previous contributions here.
        Are you for real? What's the big deal?

        Everyone has different choices in life. If someone doesn't want to write copy any more so be it.

        Oh well, maybe you're just kidding!
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      • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
        Originally Posted by RickDuris View Post

        BS, Alex.

        That's like telling BB King or Johnny Winter or Buddy Guy or Alvin Lee they can never play or sing the blues again.

        Ain't gonna happen.

        That's like telling Bob Dylan to put down his pencil. Ask him. He CAN'T.

        Or telling Keith Richards to put his guitar in the closet. You know he sleeps with his guitar, don't you?

        Exit strategy? There is none. Can't happen. It's impossible.

        No self-respecting copywriter will give up his craft without a fight.

        Not a chance in hell.

        And if he can? My opinion is he was never a copywriter in the first place. Because once you catch the bug? You can't lose it. No way. It's MRSA for marketers. Google Image MRSA. You'll see. And then you'll know.

        I stand my ground.

        Your serve, Alex. Make it good.

        - Rick Duris
        Apparently you confused the term "self-respecting" with "inspired" or "driven".
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        • Profile picture of the author AdwordsMogul
          Originally Posted by Ken_Caudill View Post

          ...or delusional.
          hahahaha this is so funny! hahhaaaa!!!
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      • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
        Rick,

        Gary Bencivenga "retired" from taking on clients.

        He set himself up with royalty payments from large mailers.

        I understand he has partnered in a venture where he does the sales side.

        You mentioned Ted Nicholas.

        He told me he doesn't see himself as a copywriter.

        He sees himself as a marketer who happens to be very good at salesmanship in print.

        Dexx asked for thoughts on the exit strategy for copywriters.
        You mentioned people from outside the copywriting profession.

        I understand you used them to illustrate their love and brilliance at what they do.

        Here's another 3 copywriters who have "retired" from taking on clients.

        Dan Kennedy John Carlton and Craig Garber.

        My understanding is Dan will only take on clients where there is a partnership arrangement,
        and from those he already knows well and it's interesting to him.

        Like Ted Nichols, he sees himself as a marketer of his information products, seminars and
        the Glazer Kennedy brand which includes a network of license holders.

        John Carlton handed over the freelance copywriting gig for Bob Pierce years ago to Jim Curly.

        Now that John has brought Stan in as partner to run the logistics side, he can be like Dan Kennedy and build out his business through helping many at once instead of one at a time.

        Gary Halbert trained copywriter Craig Garber has moved away from writing copy for others and does it foir himself promoting his book, newsletters and group coaching.

        They are all leveraging their salesmanship in print skills into business building.

        Doesn't mean they stop writing...they just channel it into higher paying areas.

        Still you have copywriters like Clayton Makepeace and Carline Anglade Cole who take on a few select clients who are big direct mailers where they can and do get ongoing royalties.

        My point is, many top copywriters use their skills to move away from taking on clients and into higher paying areas where they get paid for performance...whether it's through their own products and group coaching or whether it's partnering in a whole business with others.

        Yet their love of turning out sales pitches keeps them sharp and able to propel their financial and happiness goals together.

        Just wanted to give a balanced point of view here for Dexx.

        Best,
        Ewen
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        • Profile picture of the author marciayudkin
          Dan Kennedy John Carlton and Craig Garber.

          My understanding is Dan will only take on clients where there is a partnership arrangement,
          and from those he already knows well and it's interesting to him.
          That's exactly what I said above. Dan Kennedy is STILL writing copy for clients. He is not retired from it. He just picks and chooses his projects very selectively.

          In an interview with Perry Marshall recorded last week, he referred to the fact that he is still writing copy for clients.

          Marcia Yudkin
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          • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
            Originally Posted by marciayudkin View Post

            In an interview with Perry Marshall recorded last week, he referred to the fact that he is still writing copy for clients.

            Marcia Yudkin
            Looks like Dan threw out the term rather loosely before then when he said he had retired.

            In the interview you refer to, did he mention about a fee tied to performance?

            Best,
            Ewen
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        • Profile picture of the author MikeHumphreys
          Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post


          Dan Kennedy John Carlton and Craig Garber.

          My understanding is Dan will only take on clients where there is a partnership arrangement,
          and from those he already knows well and it's interesting to him.
          Last time I checked, Dan was quoting $100K plus ongoing royalties. He didn't retire from writing copy. He removed 99.9% of the potential clients who are looking for a copywriter contacting him.

          If memory serves me right, Dan still writes all of the copy for Rory Fatt's restaurant marketing info-products.

          Kennedy, Carlton, and Garber still teach copywriting. So they may not actively pursue copywriting clients, they are still involved in the copywriting industry.

          As for retired... never say never.

          If the right client approached any "retired" copywriter with the right product and right compensation, they'd write the copy for them.
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          • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
            Originally Posted by MikeHumphreys View Post


            As for retired... never say never.

            If the right client approached any "retired" copywriter with the right product and right compensation, they'd write the copy for them.
            Agora went knocking on Gary Bencivenga's door after his "retirement" to write for them and turned it down.

            Guess it wasn't the right deal for Gary.

            Best,
            Ewen
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  • Profile picture of the author gjabiz
    First off, I claim NO knowledge of what anyone else is doing if I haven't personally spoke to them...my last conversation with Dan Kennedy was a while back at the track where I shouted at him: "Come on Kennedy, you lard AZZ, you're costing me money."

    I doubt if Dan heard me, because he didn't respond that day with a single win. HA! Good news for me was, I may always bet on Dan when he's in the race, but never more than 2 bucks.

    From my experience with other copywriters, many, but not all, evolve into more diversified marketers who, once they achieve a level of success, pursue other interests.

    A couple have gone the reverse of HGL, from copywriting to movie making (although the only horror is on the face of their investors).

    I know many like Marcia Yudkin, very skilled copywriters who do so much more than write copy, like Ted Nicholas and Ben Suarez.

    Now a word about passion and drive. Again, this is from personal experience, so I don't have any fast and hard rules...but sometimes passion wanes and dies (ask my ex).

    Sometimes drive is overtaken by practicality, and sometimes the MUST do creative monster within finds a part-time outlet...take older musicians who play in small clubs on the weekend for example...not all can be Mick Jagger types who may indeed die on the stage with his boots up.

    When I teach EXIT strategy, and is always e other parts to your life.

    To answer the OP, the way to have an exit strategy that is right for you... is to clearly define your goals on the front end.

    Harvey Brody, a BRILLANT copywriter, still writes his own copy at 79 years young, but he built a business on a foundation which did not require a sustained and continuous effort, he set things up to operate on auto-pilot, 50 years before the Internet, and has had continuous success for over 57 years while barely talking to his 65
    clients.

    Once he got established, Harvey diversified into many other businesses, all of which were absentee on his part, so he let his money do the work for him, so he could pursue whatever it was he wanted to do, INCLUDING keeping his writing skills and copywriting chops honed to razor's edge.

    So as you consider your exit strategy...for your copywriting business, answer the questions of:

    How does this fit into your life plan?
    Where will you be in 25 years and how do you get there?
    How about the next 5 years?
    Next year?

    If it becomes a burning passion which you must absolutely do...there will be a way. IF you want to sit on the beach and let other's do it...there is a way.

    If you want to do a combination or a hybrid business...there is a way.

    The WAY is:

    YOUR WAY.

    Make it happen the way you want to. And you do that best by putting in a lot of thinking time in the beginning within the framework of a life...not just a career, business or talent.

    YOUR WAY is the right way for you.

    gjabiz

    PS. You may start off copywriting, which is an excellent choice and through learning about the businesses you write for, develop an interest, perhaps even a passion for one of them and you partner up for life. It happens.
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  • Profile picture of the author AdwordsMogul
    You see, what you say only holds true if you keep marketing yourself.

    Well, the moment you stop people will slowly forget about you. Or they will assume you're "retired".

    It doesn't matter who you are.

    A few people contacting you here and there? Maybe.

    People lining up? Only with constant and consistent promotion.

    Plus, there are other factors involved, beyond the scope of this thread.

    And then of course, your definition of "top copywriter" may be different from mine.

    Make no mistake, there isn't such a point in life where everything comes to you. This is true, regardless of how hard you have worked, or how famous you are.
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    • Profile picture of the author lemonarian
      Originally Posted by AdwordsMogul View Post

      Make no mistake, there isn't such a point in life where everything comes to you. This is true, regardless of how hard you have worked, or how famous you are.
      Well... duh. I never said that. In fact, I agree with most everything you have said.
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  • Good post and I'm trying to plot my next move. There are lots of ways to go. Direct Response Copywriting is a seriously valuable skill and the first choice: will I do this for someone else or for me? 'Both' is a perfectly acceptable answer.

    I would listen to some of the interviews with direct response copywriters on Michael Senoff's site. All the interviewees talk about being 'at the crossroads' and they all went in different directions.

    While I can write copy that converts, I'm making a bit effort right now to ramp up my DR copywriting to the 'elite' level PLUS I'm learning everything I can about SEO, PPC, sales funnel optimization, etc.

    Direct response copywriting + direct marketing knowledge = big potential.
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    • Profile picture of the author ThomasOMalley
      I recommend that you set a goal of financial freedom with your copywriting. Of course, you can continue copywriting even after you have reached your financial freedom goal.

      Read books by David Bach and others to figure out what financial freedom means to you. I also recommend Brian Tracy's Goals book.

      In other words, figure out your life goals etc.

      Best of luck,

      Thomas O'Malley
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  • Profile picture of the author Daniel Scott
    IMHO, there's nothing wrong with having an exit strategy... even if you never use it.

    After all... we all need a break from time to time. And what's the difference between a vacation and a renounced retirement, apart from length?

    Personally, I'm a believer in diversifying income streams. I write copy for clients, sure, and I make a good living from it.

    But I'm partnering with other marketers, doing a lot of consulting, creating monthly services, and even working on my own ventures.

    When I have more capital I'd even like to open a few restaurants and other "offline" businesses.

    Personally Dexx, I think there's a lot of ways to make money, and you're already doing some of them.

    IMHO the next step is to diversify and safeguard your income, and also build businesses that you work on, not in. In short, businesses that run more or less "hands free".

    There's nothing saying you can't do different things. Follow your passions and interests. It's your life, live it how you want.

    -Daniel
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    Always looking for badass direct-response copywriters. PM me if we don't know each other and you're looking for work.

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  • Profile picture of the author livepsycle
    I'm thinking of putting the money I earn from copywriting into other ventures. I'm also thinking about training other writers I can trust and letting them do the writing and paying them on performance. Taking a cut myself.

    Multiple writers. Small cut for each. Good money for me.

    Then I'm living an ultra low cost life growing my own food and walking naked and barefoot through a private forest with big breasted hippy girls performing... Reiki at my every whim.
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  • Profile picture of the author michaelgrisso
    Hey Dexx,

    There are so many different angles here it's really going to come down to whether or not you are going to enjoy the next angle you take and the income level. I've only been writing content online since 2006, but have a little over 20,000 articles around the web.

    I have a few other things in the works, but moving on from copywriting for me was taking my knowledge and integrating it into building a new kind of article directory.

    I imagine you could broker out these services and hire other writers. Since you already have the knowledge it would allow you to provide your expertise to others. Sounds like a fun predicament to be in and I hope you find the perfect solution.

    Good luck!
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    • Michael,

      I think he's talking about copywriting, not content writing.
      Originally Posted by michaelgrisso View Post

      Hey Dexx,

      There are so many different angles here it's really going to come down to whether or not you are going to enjoy the next angle you take and the income level. I've only been writing content online since 2006, but have a little over 20,000 articles around the web.

      I have a few other things in the works, but moving on from copywriting for me was taking my knowledge and integrating it into building a new kind of article directory.

      I imagine you could broker out these services and hire other writers. Since you already have the knowledge it would allow you to provide your expertise to others. Sounds like a fun predicament to be in and I hope you find the perfect solution.

      Good luck!
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  • Profile picture of the author michaelgrisso
    Oh he definitely is; I was just saying if he spent years copywriting then brokering it as a business where his expertise would be used could be an angle.

    Even though I only do a minimal amount of copywriting here and there; the majority of my work has been for article marketing. Since my expertise is in this area I will be providing it to others through a directory when it's finished and getting away from the writing myself.

    I see above where I said; "but moving on from copywriting for me," which I meant to just type "writing."

    Cheers,
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  • Profile picture of the author kellyburdes
    I've not been a member of the Warrior Forum for a long time, and I've not built up friends and relationships here yet....so I'm not trying to step out of line or cause any type of ruckus. I gotta say though....

    I'm shocked to find a self proclaimed top level copy writer and mentor openly displaying one of the most common and expensive indulgences a marketer or copy writer can make..one which typically, if not isolated and ruthlessly eliminated has led to countless fortunes lost, business' bankrupted and dreams destroyed.

    That deadly rookie mistake, a common one, is to assume that your motivation and psychology are shared by everyone (or anyone for that matter) else. It's true for me, it's true for me and my friends, so "obviously" it's true for everyone.

    Life is not that simple.

    For everything there is a season.

    I love what I do and can't imagine doing anything else. Neither can I imagine "retirement", to me it seems like a terrible fate, but there are many people who love what they do (and are great at it) but can't wait to slow down or retire some day.

    The inability to walk away is not the display of passion, it's the display of an unhealthy compulsion - and one that typically leads to burn out and worse.
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    • Profile picture of the author MikeHumphreys
      Originally Posted by kellyburdes View Post

      The inability to walk away is not the display of passion, it's the display of an unhealthy compulsion - and one that typically leads to burn out and worse.
      That really depends on the person. There are people who can do their passion full-time and still give equal time to other "healthy" activities like spending time with friends and family. They've learned to keep things in balance.

      In a previous life, I owned a massage therapy center where I worked 110 hours (minimum) each week. I won't go into the reasons why I worked so much here because it would derail this thread. My point is, I did burn out and it was a valuable lesson to learn while still in my 30's.

      Since then, I've gotten married and become a dad to 2 awesome kids (5 and 3). I make a conscious effort to spend as much time with them as I can... especially while they still think I'm the coolest dad in the world.

      Since then, I have times set up each week to decompress and do fun stuff like catch a movie or play video games.

      But like a UFC fighter climbing into the fighting cage, when I go to work then my game face goes on and I'm all business. And part of that game face is being completely immersed and passionate about what I do when I do it.

      Take care,

      Mike
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  • Profile picture of the author Blake King
    My goal has always been to go into information/direct marketing.

    I only see freelance copywriting as a way to make ends meet until I can start things up on the business side of things.

    Not to mention it'll make me better at marketing in general.
    Signature
    "Over 2 months ago Keith Baxter referred Blake King to me for some copywriting projects. Blake's copy skills are on another level. Our open rates and conversions have both doubled. I'll continue to use Blake on multiple projects in the near future." - Armando Alejandro
    blakeking.com

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  • Profile picture of the author anuragchoubey
    Hi i have been copy writing for some years and sometimes i have outsourced my work to other copywriters,it would be advisable to have good contract terms with them and always make sure to keep tab on the quality of the work
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    • Profile picture of the author marciayudkin
      The inability to walk away is not the display of passion, it's the display of an unhealthy compulsion - and one that typically leads to burn out and worse.
      I disagree. Let's take it out of the realm of writing for a moment. Surely you know someone who loves making music so much they can't stand more than a day or two without it, or someone who loves gardening so much they are willing to put up with sore knees and a stiff neck far beyond the age when others have given it up. This is not necessarily unhealthy at all. Such love may on the contrary a sign of a strong life force and a healthy emotional system.

      I do think that someone who feels that way and has turned their passion into their mode of livelihood is at high risk of burnout. But in those cases, their "retirement" or quitting is usually quite temporary and they come back to it and do what they love out of love and not compulsion.

      Marcia Yudkin
      Signature
      Check out Marcia Yudkin's No-Hype Marketing Academy for courses on copywriting, publicity, infomarketing, marketing plans, naming, and branding - not to mention the popular "Marketing for Introverts" course.
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      • Profile picture of the author arfasaira
        I love writing, love copywriting and love the written word full stop. I will never stop no matter what. However, as far as copywriting goes, I want to take my work down a notch or two - a few here on the forum know that I've had more work than I can handle and although I love it, it has been wearing me down.

        Unfortunately, those who know my personal circumstances know I'm working my socks off for my kids...but what I AM doing is building my business on the side too - so that I can eventually have more time to concentrate on my kids and other passions I have.

        Ive got a few offline clients who I'm working with as a marketing consultant and this really gives me a buzz. I'll never stop copywriting, but I want to work on having fewer clients that pay more so I can have that spare time with my kids and do stuff I enjoy.

        It's not so much an exit strategy as it is an alternative plan that still includes copywriting.
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        • Profile picture of the author marciayudkin
          However, as far as copywriting goes, I want to take my work down a notch or two - a few here on the forum know that I've had more work than I can handle and although I love it, it has been wearing me down.
          That's a clear signal that it's time for you to raise your prices - perhaps by a lot.

          Marcia Yudkin
          Signature
          Check out Marcia Yudkin's No-Hype Marketing Academy for courses on copywriting, publicity, infomarketing, marketing plans, naming, and branding - not to mention the popular "Marketing for Introverts" course.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mark Andrews
    Banned
    Originally Posted by Dexx View Post

    Hey gang,

    I''ve been able to successfully get some momentum in securing copywriting clients, but now that I have a couple, I'm realizing how truly time consuming doing proper research, and providing compelling copy, can be for each client.

    Luckily I am also local business marketing strategies as well (for the bulk of my marketing-based income), but I'm wondering, what is the typical "exit strategy" for someone who does actually build a full-time income off of copywriting?

    What happens when you've been doing it for 10, 15, or 20 years and then decide to pack up your copywriting business?

    Since the income is mainly dependent on you doing the work (not sure how many copywriters sub-contract their clients out to other copywriters), how do you truly "retire" as a copywriter.

    Is that where having contracts that include a percentage of profits come in to play? So that you continue earning revenue long after you stop writing copy?

    Or what would be the next step?

    Information products? Create your own coaching program and teach other copywriters for a monthly continuity, etc.

    Just curious what the thoughts are of some of the more veteran copywriters here in terms of what their "end goal" would be...

    ~Dexx
    Copywriting clients after you've been in the game for a few years can be a mild pain in the butt at the best of times.

    All of us experienced copywriters, we've all got successes behind us and our marketing knowledge is vast.

    Why spend time lining the pockets of clients with tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands of dollars when it's pretty simple to create your own products based on all of the knowledge given to you over the years?

    You can easily create a unique product of your own given a week or two, something which has a major benefit to other marketers or business owners. Wrap this up in an enticing package and for the time expended, you too could be earning a sizeable income each month from your own product offering.

    If you truly love copywriting for copywriting sake (and many of us do) you can still carry on offering your unique skills to others but the real money? The real money yes... is in creating your own products, whatever they may be.
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  • Profile picture of the author Bruce NewMedia
    Each to his own, of course, but I can't see retiring from copywriting, if one is any good at it...and still enjoys it.

    Many years ago, part of the reason I went for this, was I could do it the rest of my life. As long as my mind held out, I had an occupation.

    By comparison, my very good friend is now facing forced retirement, as his work is very physical and his body, just gave out. He doesn't know what he'll do the rest of his life, and he's only 55.

    What I have always liked about this work is it has so many interesting 'nooks and crannies'....so many different ways to monetize your copy skills. For example, 18 months ago I started writing and selling my own products. In and out of the IM niche.
    Early on, I would have never thought of that. Now it seems limitless.

    I feel sorry for people who can't wait to retire....to me, personally, a full life should be family and work you love....waiting to get through work, to get to 'something else', seems pointless.

    Margaret Mead once said, your work should be something you would pay 'them' to let you do.

    I agree, and at the moment it does all end, you should be holding the paint brush in your hand, stirring the soup kettle, or pounding the keyboard.

    ...and as soon as I wrote that I realized you should not be landing the 747, parking the school bus or having sex in a porn movie. Alright, nothing is perfect.
    _____
    Bruce
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