Is this your opinion on launch sequence copywriting?

24 replies
I'm finishing up a new course that will be launched using the multiple video launch sequence.

Now, here's my thoughts.

The first 3 videos are more content based and as long as I deliver content that is engaging and actionable, they should be fine without help. Correct?

However, the last video will be pitching for the sale.

Now, the whole point of this launch sequence is that it builds more relationship connections with the audience, so that making the sale should be easier, but I still feel a little uncomfortable with just putting up a video that may have an average pitch.

Has anyone here ever performed a launch like this, and can you give advice? Do any of you specialise in this kind of thing?

Is it your opinion that the pitch video would need to be scripted by a skilled copywriter?
#copywriting #launch #opinion #sequence
  • Profile picture of the author Drez
    Actually EVERYTHING should be scripted - to some degree or another. But especially the offer video.

    Jeff Walker points out that it critical to mention that you'll be offering a product later on, towards the tail end of third content video. Something like, "If you like what you've seen so far we REALLY dive deep into it in the full course. But I'll tell you more about that in the next video."

    Otherwise people will be shocked and confused when they go the the last video - expecting pure content - and instead getting a sales spiel.

    How are you driving traffic to the "training" sequence? Do you have an existing list - with a relationship - that you can send into the sequence?

    If so you should also have a series of emails setting up the training videos to the list.
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  • Profile picture of the author RickDuris
    Hi Melanie,

    Quick question: Is yours one of those types of launches where you will continue to keep launching again and again?

    On the other hand...

    If you only have one shot at making the initial launch successful, you may want to assure your success by bringing in a professional copywriter.

    If this launch will be repeated over and over with different JV partners, my strategy would be to initially launch with small email list or second or third tier JV and work out the bugs. You'll have the ability to course correct for later with bigger, more influential launches. SO if this occuring mutiple times, from what've seen of your copy, I'd bring on board a loyal copywriter who isn't necessarily top tier, but who has the willingness to grow with you.

    But do not assume or communicate anything but essential success to the JV partners. Because if you don't believe, who will?!

    That would be great because you'll create buzz which will inspire new JV folks to jump on your band wagon.

    - Rick Duris

    PS: If you launch and problems occur, even if it is such a small, almost unnoticeable errors, apologize for them publicly. It will build tremendous good will, especially if you're always a step ahead and people will appreciate you..
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  • Profile picture of the author kellyburdes
    Like Drez said you need to have a script for your entire process.

    Keep in mind that your first piece of prelaunch content is the most important. It's like the headline in your sales copy, it grabs people's attention and keeps them looking for more.

    You should start to make a slow transition into the fact that you are selling something. In the first piece I don't mention selling anything at all, for me that is purely to get them in.

    By the second I start to drop hints, in the third I'm talking about it more, and then the fourth or fifth video in the case of my launches is to seal the deal.

    But you can't just dump it on them after giving them great content and building up all that trust, because if you do then you lose a lot of the trust and good will. People will feel like you took advantage of them if you don't do it right.

    It's actually not all that complicated, and if I'm making it sound like it is I'm sorry - it's always a process of trial and error of course.

    Most likely your first launch will be full of mistakes and holes and won't be all that great. Your second will be better, and by the third one you'll be cruisin'.

    If you can pick up Product Launch Formula you'd certainly be doing yourself a huge favor. A word of warning, Walker gives away some of the best information on the market, but he's not the most engaging guy in the world to listen to on the video's. The content is the best out there though. I'm not sure when he's going to launch again though.

    If PLF is not available, there are almost always copies of Mass Control 1.0 and 2.0 on Ebay for a few hundred dollars. Get that.

    Both products are essentially on launching products, slightly different processes they use.

    Good luck.
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  • Profile picture of the author Dietriffic
    @Drez
    I'm scripting every video, but it's not by a pro copywriter.

    Thanks for the tip on the third video. I don't remember Jeff advising that, but it has been a while since I went through PLF 2.0.

    I'll initially be driving traffic from my own list and blog, and there are a few people I can call on to partner, too.

    I've been trying to set up the videos already in some regard by getting their frustrations about 10 days ago, and today or tomorrow I'm going to publish a post where I analyse the frustrations people have. My thinking behind this is that it will show

    a) that those who responded are having their problem examined and solved.
    b) those who didn't respond will see that their problem is being addressed (I'm assuming very few have a different problem to what has been mentioned by others).

    @Rick
    It's weight loss coaching, and initially I'm thinking of launching once every 3 months and focusing for 10 weeks on those who come in to the program. I may in the future test doing an 'evergreen' launch process, where it LOOKS like I'm launching, but it will allow traffic to be converted every day of the year, rather than four times each year.

    I have a list of about 7,000 with about 1,000 of them opening my emails regularly (not great, I know) and a blog with over 80k unique visitors/month.

    So what do you think, guys?

    Rick, your postscript is a good tip. I'm a very transparent character anyway, but it's good to be reminded to let people know what's happening.
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  • Profile picture of the author kellyburdes
    What Rick said is also spot on.

    If it's your first launch, unless your in a position to hire a good copywriter and launch manager, don't go for the top of the line "A Team" JV's just yet. The reason for this is because your really only going to get one chance with them in most cases, and so you want to make sure you have all your ducks in a row so to speak.

    Get some B and C tier players, or as Walker says warm up with the B team. By doing this you accomplish several things. You build up experience with the process of launching so that your conversions and EPC's go up, which is important when you get into the big league, and you also build your own list - which you most likely need to get the A team guys talking to you anyway.

    If your in a niche where there are buyers you should be able to easily find 200/300 bloggers to approach for your first launch. Most of them are not going to be know much about IM, but keep in mind that your approach to them is also a sale, so it must be thought out. But if you approach 200/300 bloggers, article writers etc you aught to be able to have between 15 and 40 people who actually pull through and makes sales for you, and that can make for a very nice launch.
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    • Profile picture of the author RickDuris
      Also Melanie, you want to become fully conversant in EPC calculations and their relevancy in a JV's desire to promote you.

      You want to document all conversation, conversion and calculations with JV partners regarding the EPC for your launch.

      When you have multiple JV partners promoting on the same launch you want to set realistic expectations. so you could legitimately say something like this:
      "Our average EPC across the board is $X.XX, It sometimes goes as low as Y.YYY and no promises but as high as $Z.ZZ. It depends on the usage of the list and frequent they mail, what the price point is etc."
      Now some marketers might say that statement above tips your hand too much, but the fact is most JVs get snookered by conversations like these when results are not in line with expectations. It leaves a bad tastes in the JVs mouth.

      So in line with your them of transparency, you may want to lead with that as a test.

      Remember, in a particular market like weight loss, most webmasters know each other anyway and they'll get external validation just to be sure.

      - Rick Duris
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  • Profile picture of the author Dietriffic
    Good tips guys. I really appreciate it.

    I think I'll launch to my list first and see how it goes. I know the product is what they're looking for, so if it goes belly up, I'll know that the problem is in the launch process.

    I might have to get you guys to run your eye over the squeeze page first though, so I know that it's at least acceptable.
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    • Profile picture of the author Jeff Walker
      Originally Posted by Dietriffic View Post

      I think I'll launch to my list first and see how it goes. I know the product is what they're looking for, so if it goes belly up, I'll know that the problem is in the launch process.
      This is EXACTLY the right approach... do an Internal Launch first (ie, just to your list, no outside JV partners or affiliates), and then after you have the launch dialed in then you roll it out to partners with a JV Launch.

      That's standard Product Launch Formula... it's exactly what i teach. There are occasional rare exceptions, but in general it's far better to practice on your own list, get the sequence and timing down... and then go out to partners.


      - Jeff
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      • Profile picture of the author donaldwilson
        Listen to EVERYTHING Jeff says about product launches.

        He is the BEST at teaching launches. Period.

        I am doing exactly what he says to do and am doing pretty well with launches.

        You're doing it right.

        -don

        Originally Posted by Jeff Walker View Post

        This is EXACTLY the right approach... do an Internal Launch first (ie, just to your list, no outside JV partners or affiliates), and then after you have the launch dialed in then you roll it out to partners with a JV Launch.

        That's standard Product Launch Formula... it's exactly what i teach. There are occasional rare exceptions, but in general it's far better to practice on your own list, get the sequence and timing down... and then go out to partners.


        - Jeff
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      • Profile picture of the author Dietriffic
        Originally Posted by Jeff Walker View Post

        This is EXACTLY the right approach... do an Internal Launch first (ie, just to your list, no outside JV partners or affiliates), and then after you have the launch dialed in then you roll it out to partners with a JV Launch.

        That's standard Product Launch Formula... it's exactly what i teach. There are occasional rare exceptions, but in general it's far better to practice on your own list, get the sequence and timing down... and then go out to partners.


        - Jeff
        Thanks for this, Jeff. Means a lot.

        My husband and I bought PLF 2.0. He's more into the marketing side of things and it's really him that's coming up with the ideas of how to deliver my new product.

        He says it has been a while since he has went through all the videos of PLF, which is probably why he doesn't have clarity on every aspect of what you taught us.

        P.S. Loved the Colorado river story. Read it last night. Not sure I'd have the guts you have, but it was a cool read.
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        • Profile picture of the author Jeff Walker
          Originally Posted by Dietriffic View Post

          P.S. Loved the Colorado river story. Read it last night. Not sure I'd have the guts you have, but it was a cool read.
          It was fun to write it up... I guess that's a side of me that a lot of people don't know about. And it's definitely a side that I draw a lot of inspiration from when I get back to business.

          I'm not sure I've got any more guts than you or anyone else... I think I've just got a bunch of experience.


          - Jeff
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  • Profile picture of the author RickDuris
    Wonderful idea, Melanie. Again, same thing applies with regards to the EPC conversation. Treat yourself as a Partner so that you have proof of conversion.

    - Rick Duris
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    • Profile picture of the author Dietriffic
      Originally Posted by RickDuris View Post

      Wonderful idea, Melanie. Again, same thing applies with regards to the EPC conversation. Treat yourself as a as a Partner so that you have proof of conversion.

      - Rick Duris
      Is there anything that can help with the accuracy of the results, or is it just a matter of analysing Google Analytics to see how many uniques are sent and getting the percentage from the number of buyers?
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      • Profile picture of the author kellyburdes
        Clickbank has decent tracking, not outstanding, but pretty good.


        Originally Posted by Dietriffic View Post

        Is there anything that can help with the accuracy of the results, or is it just a matter of analysing Google Analytics to see how many uniques are sent and getting the percentage from the number of buyers?
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        • Profile picture of the author Dietriffic
          Originally Posted by kellyburdes View Post

          Clickbank has decent tracking, not outstanding, but pretty good.
          I was thinking of just using DAP to start with.

          Would you advise going with Clickbank from the start?
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      • Profile picture of the author RickDuris
        Originally Posted by Dietriffic View Post

        Is there anything that can help with the accuracy of the results, or is it just a matter of analyzing Google Analytics to see how many uniques are sent and getting the percentage from the number of buyers?
        I don't know who's hosting your email, here are the numbers I'd want to be tracking (assuming you have all the pieces in place

        1. Total emails sent.

        2. Total emails opened and percentage of total emails sent (These numbers tell you if the email subject line was strong enough to be opened.)

        3. Total email clicked through to sales letter v. percentage of total emails opened. (These numbers tell you if the body copy of the email was strong enough to get people to the sales letter.)

        4. Total unique visitors.

        5. Total sales.

        I don't know if there's going to be a huge discrepancy between total visitors and total click through rate.

        --------------------

        Do the above for each email sent, so you can determine which email is performing acceptably and which need to upgraded/swapped out.

        --------------------

        Have fun,

        -- Rick Duris
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  • Profile picture of the author kellyburdes
    Not familiar with DAP so I have no valid opinion to offer there.
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  • Profile picture of the author Dietriffic
    @Rick

    Aweber host my email. I haven't upgraded to get the full stats yet though. I must do that.

    Thanks to all. I appreciate the help thus far.
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  • Profile picture of the author MikeHumphreys
    Originally Posted by Dietriffic View Post

    Has anyone here ever performed a launch like this, and can you give advice? Do any of you specialise in this kind of thing?

    Is it your opinion that the pitch video would need to be scripted by a skilled copywriter?
    Yes, I've done launches like this. The pitch video should be done but by someone with some copywriting skills (vs. just "winging it) to maximize your chances of a strong conversion rate.

    A good amount of the free advice I'd offer has already been given by others in this thread.

    The one suggestion I will give you is talk to a veteran copywriter like Drez, Brian McLeod, or Rick Duris and find out what they'd charge you to critique your launch pieces before they go live.

    I'd bet dollars to donuts that they'd find enough "tweaks" that would more than justify whatever fee they asked for.

    Best of luck,

    Mike
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    • Profile picture of the author Dietriffic
      Originally Posted by MikeHumphreys View Post

      The one suggestion I will give you is talk to a veteran copywriter like Drez, Brian McLeod, or Rick Duris and find out what they'd charge you to critique your launch pieces before they go live.

      I'd bet dollars to donuts that they'd find enough "tweaks" that would more than justify whatever fee they asked for.
      My husband's not totally ignorant of copywriting, but he'd be the first to admit he's no Vin Montello.

      The first video is actually a video interview with someone who lost weight on my plan (along with an actionable tip at the end that they can do right away and notice a difference very quickly).

      Is an interview like this a good piece of pre launch content?

      The second video is another strategy they can put into action immediately and notice a difference by the end of the day.

      The third video is where I give away the revolutionary formula (and that's not hyperbole) that I discovered when studying why other diets fail. I looked at the basic formula they used, spotted the flaw, and created another my own formula that solves the problem.

      Also, in that video I advise them that now they are aware of this formula, it may be possible for them to adapt their own weight loss plan around it.

      The fourth video is the pitch video.

      I haven't created video 2, 3, or 4 yet. But I've a rough script. Would it be necessary to have a copywriter look over 2 and 3?

      Getting someone to look over the pitch script might be a good idea, even if I'm just pitching to my list to begin with.
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      • Profile picture of the author MikeHumphreys
        Originally Posted by Dietriffic View Post

        My husband's not totally ignorant of copywriting, but he'd be the first to admit he's no Vin Montello.

        The first video is actually a video interview with someone who lost weight on my plan (along with an actionable tip at the end that they can do right away and notice a difference very quickly).

        Is an interview like this a good piece of pre launch content?
        Without seeing/hearing the interview, I'd have to say... It depends. For that reason alone, I'll offer you some general advice.

        The question you need to ask yourself objectively is... who does the interview position as the expert?

        If it strongly positions you as an expert, great.

        If it doesn't... or worse, it makes the person you interviewed look like the expert then it could hurt your launch efforts.

        It might be better to present the key points yourself as the first video so all of the great info is coming from *you* and positions you strongly.

        The second video is another strategy they can put into action immediately and notice a difference by the end of the day.

        The third video is where I give away the revolutionary formula (and that's not hyperbole) that I discovered when studying why other diets fail. I looked at the basic formula they used, spotted the flaw, and created another my own formula that solves the problem.

        Also, in that video I advise them that now they are aware of this formula, it may be possible for them to adapt their own weight loss plan around it.

        The fourth video is the pitch video.

        I haven't created video 2, 3, or 4 yet. But I've a rough script. Would it be necessary to have a copywriter look over 2 and 3?
        It depends.

        If you're doing an internal launch first and track your metrics like an OCD-driven marketer, then you'll be able to tell which video had a drop-off in feedback, etc.

        Depending on your husband's copywriting skills (I'm assuming he's writing the scripts for you), he may or may not be able to identify any holes in the script that caused the disconnect in the viewers.

        Getting someone to look over the pitch script might be a good idea, even if I'm just pitching to my list to begin with.
        At the very least you're getting some objective opinions and feedback. Just pick someone who you know has strong marketing and copywriting skills... otherwise the advice you get could make things worse, not better.

        Some of my own info-products, I don't bother to ask a friend to give me feedback... they're a quick launch and I'll just test and tweak the copy gradually over time. But the products of mine where I'm planning to bring in affiliates and JVs, I want strong metrics from my own internal launch to use as a recruiting tool.


        Hope that helps,

        Mike
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        • Profile picture of the author Dietriffic
          Originally Posted by MikeHumphreys View Post

          Without seeing/hearing the interview, I'd have to say... It depends. For that reason alone, I'll offer you some general advice.

          The question you need to ask yourself objectively is... who does the interview position as the expert?

          If it strongly positions you as an expert, great.
          It definitely positions me as the expert. I'm interviewing a 53 y/o overweight (not massively obese) serial dieter who followed my advice, firmed up, lost 17lbs, and 6 inches around her waist in 10 weeks. Modest results, but it strikes at my target audience. A young man with high metabolism losing lots of weight wouldn't resonate with most of my list.

          Originally Posted by MikeHumphreys View Post

          At the very least you're getting some objective opinions and feedback. Just pick someone who you know has strong marketing and copywriting skills... otherwise the advice you get could make things worse, not better.
          The question is... who?

          Or perhaps the question is, who can I afford?
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      • Profile picture of the author Jeff Walker
        Originally Posted by Dietriffic View Post

        The first video is actually a video interview with someone who lost weight on my plan (along with an actionable tip at the end that they can do right away and notice a difference very quickly).

        Is an interview like this a good piece of pre launch content?

        This CAN be a good place to start the pre-launch. The place where you can get into trouble with using an interview as part of the prelaunch (especially as the first piece) is that sometimes interviews don't deliver a tight enough message to really frame the pre-launch.

        I actually started my PLF 3.1 pre-launch with an interview... and it worked really well. But I also had four full-motion sequences with me at a whiteboard really drawing out the key points from the interview.


        Originally Posted by Dietriffic View Post

        The second video is another strategy they can put into action immediately and notice a difference by the end of the day.
        Sounds like an excellent second piece of pre-launch content.


        Originally Posted by Dietriffic View Post

        The third video is where I give away the revolutionary formula (and that's not hyperbole) that I discovered when studying why other diets fail. I looked at the basic formula they used, spotted the flaw, and created another my own formula that solves the problem.

        Also, in that video I advise them that now they are aware of this formula, it may be possible for them to adapt their own weight loss plan around it.

        One of the most common mistakes people make in launches is that the final piece of pre-launch content doesn't set up the sale in the next video.

        IE, the last few minutes of this video has to telegraph that there is a pitch coming. People often get too caught up in continuing to give great content in their pre-launch... and they try to jam in even more content in the last video. That's cool and all... but you HAVE to start the transition to the sale at the end of this piece of pre-launch content.


        - Jeff
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        • Profile picture of the author Dietriffic
          Originally Posted by Jeff Walker View Post

          This CAN be a good place to start the pre-launch. The place where you can get into trouble with using an interview as part of the prelaunch (especially as the first piece) is that sometimes interviews don't deliver a tight enough message to really frame the pre-launch.

          I actually started my PLF 3.1 pre-launch with an interview... and it worked really well. But I also had four full-motion sequences with me at a whiteboard really drawing out the key points from the interview.
          Your launch is where my husband got the idea. Since we're launching a brand new product, he thought it would add to the social proof element.

          He's also put together a pretty emotive promo video of the interview (under 2 mins) which we'll use on the squeeze page to give an appetite for the interview.

          I never thought about me talking in points between the video. We had thought it would be sufficient to frame it with an intro and a conclusion. Perhaps I'll do what you did.

          Originally Posted by Jeff Walker View Post

          Sounds like an excellent second piece of pre-launch content.
          With weight loss it's difficult to give full blown strategies without giving too much away, or assuming we're rehashing some other diet.

          Thus, the idea was to give an actionable tip the viewer can use and experience almost instant gratification (good tip from the Billy Mays article on Schefren's blog), tell them all about it, what to do, and why it works.

          Originally Posted by Jeff Walker View Post

          One of the most common mistakes people make in launches is that the final piece of pre-launch content doesn't set up the sale in the next video.

          IE, the last few minutes of this video has to telegraph that there is a pitch coming. People often get too caught up in continuing to give great content in their pre-launch... and they try to jam in even more content in the last video. That's cool and all... but you HAVE to start the transition to the sale at the end of this piece of pre-launch content.
          Yeah, someone mentioned this already, so it has been noted. The third piece is really soft-selling our product the whole way through anyway, in explaining the whole formula behind the program.
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