Are People "Immune" To Similar Sales Letters/Pages?

14 replies
With similar approaches, styles, and formatting are people becoming immune to copywriting?

Or is it similar to TV advertising where everyone doesn't like them yet (unconsciously) they're effective anyway?
#“immune” #letters or pages #people #sales #similar
  • Profile picture of the author Azarna
    A very interesting question.

    When I first began learning about IM, I was actually quite shocked that here was a medium where one was actively discouraged from being original or innovative.

    You have to use wordpress, have a very long page, include PSs (and PPSs), price ending in 7, include bonuses, use a headline from a limited sample of 'guaranteed' ones, start with a sob story, use similar looking call to action buttons as everyone else, use lots of red type, etc etc - all to the same formula.

    (Before someone jumps on me, this is comic exaggeration, but let's be honest, it is the general truth of the matter.)

    In tv advertising, although I don't doubt there are certain 'tried and testeds', the most lauded adverts are those that are innovative and different.
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  • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
    Originally Posted by Jonathan 2.0 View Post

    With similar approaches, styles, and formatting are people becoming immune to copywriting?

    Or is it similar to TV advertising where everyone doesn't like them yet (unconsciously) they're effective anyway?
    Neither.

    Over time, people become "immune" to certain marketing tactics. They don't, however, become immune to the basic psychological triggers.

    Example: As copywriters, we know what motivates people to act. And yet, when presented with an offer that touches a driving emotion, we're just as apt to buy as anybody else.

    Alex
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    • Profile picture of the author OutOfThisWord
      People are immune to uninteresting boring anything.

      The creative copywriter and/or company takes the time to jar the prospect out of their day-to-day boredom...

      ...from the time they check their email in the morning, to the drone of radio advertising they hear on the way to work, to the knuckleheads that think the only way to market to businesses is with telemarketing.

      Every once in a while they are surprised to see or hear something and feel like the message is just for them.

      And they vote with their purses and wallets and the smart advertiser lives to fight another day.

      Long copy has been around longer than long johns and only global warming will see a demise to the latter, but never to the former.
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    • Profile picture of the author TopKat22
      Originally Posted by Alex Cohen View Post

      Neither.

      Over time, people become "immune" to certain marketing tactics. They don't, however, become immune to the basic psychological triggers.

      Example: As copywriters, we know what motivates people to act. And yet, when presented with an offer that touches a driving emotion, we're just as apt to buy as anybody else.

      Alex
      Absolutely!!!

      It works because emotions SELL!!!!
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  • Profile picture of the author profitmaster7
    I think after people have been scammed into falling for someone's email-scavenging ploy, they begin to think: Fool me once, shame on you; Fool my twice, shame on me. Be original but use good marketing.
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  • Profile picture of the author JoniWBeadle
    Like I've heard quite often...you're offer has to be the most exciting thing that your potential customer has ever seen...
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    • Profile picture of the author thehorizon
      Think about it this way. As copywriters/advertisers, we are THE people to channel the market's desires towards a certain solution. Desires don't disappear overnight- neither are they created overnight. We find these huge, maybe even "dormant" desires that people want to fulfill, and actively market a solution to them. Something like a matchmaker.

      The market has different stages as it proceeds on. Most of the time, especially in modern times, it would be rare to have a total monopoly in a market (unless there was a high entry barrier or govermental intervention). Due to massive competition, the market is either confused on which solution is best suited for them, or totally unaware of these existing solutions. We advertise to increase an awareness to that product and show how it can solve the market's needs.

      When a market becomes "immune" in the manner you said, it normally means that a certain "mechanism" has been replayed and overused. So much that most of the market feel that the "mechanism" has been marketed so often the market doesn't find it to be ab advantage or desirable anymore. That's when advertisers use different selling angles... And the whole cycle continues.

      "Creative" advertisements on tv or radio are different. They're not there as a real sales pitch, but part of a whole sales campaign. Talk about branding, customer awareness, changing how the brand looks different from other competitors.... And maybe a few big brands in the offline world come to mind.

      But I don't necessarily agree with the boring templates etc etc. I mean- all these headlines were tested, and that's why people think they're more reliable to use. They have certain linguistic "meanings" behind them and that's why some of them work. That's not any reason why you can't use anything else. Just test- if it works... Then you have a new headline.

      Every other part of the copy is a form of "art". A great copy beautifully crafted with the necessary elements. Each sentence is deliberately put there for a specific reason- all edging towards the closing of the sale.
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      • Profile picture of the author Jonathan 2.0
        Thanks everyone. : )

        Horizon that response was grand. Pretty much answered my question perfectly.

        And, reminded me of something I learned some time ago (can't remember where) ... Basically a copywriters job is often about channelling the markets’ desire (rather than trying to create it).
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  • Profile picture of the author Raydal
    While a copywriter is trying to get the highest conversion possible
    a very good letter would do about 2-5%. This means that up to
    98% of the visitors don't buy. Now if we said that 98% of the
    people don't like the sales letter format should we abandon it?

    That's the point I try to raise a million times on this board. Most
    people don't like ANYTHING you sell online. Most people don't
    buy ANYTHING you sell online. So if you are trying to please
    everybody you'll sell to nobody.

    Just this weekend while trying to explain what I do to a new
    friend he immediately said, "You mean those long letters that
    try to get you to buy or give your email addresses? Oh, I've
    seen those online."

    Some people click away as soon as they see the long sales letter
    format, but this doesn't mean that we should all abandon them.

    If video sales letter work better for your market then by all
    means use them, but I cannot imagine a time when sales
    letter would stop working. People have been writing and
    reading letters for eons.

    -Ray Edwards
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    The most powerful and concentrated copywriting training online today bar none! Autoresponder Writing Email SECRETS
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    • Profile picture of the author Jonathan 2.0
      Excellent point. (Something to remember.) Thanks Ray.
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      "Each problem has hidden in it an opportunity so powerful that it literally dwarfs the problem. The greatest success stories were created by people who recognized a problem and turned it into an opportunity."―Joseph Sugarman
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  • Profile picture of the author ThomasOMalley
    Originally Posted by Jonathan 2.0 View Post

    With similar approaches, styles, and formatting are people becoming immune to copywriting?

    Or is it similar to TV advertising where everyone doesn't like them yet (unconsciously) they're effective anyway?
    I've seen a number of questions lately on the forum in which people seem to question the basic underpinnings of direct marketing and copywriting.

    Don't use these questions as an excuse. As John Carlton said many times, "Just sell the damn thing." If you don't want to do that, don't be an entrepreneur.
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    • Profile picture of the author Jonathan 2.0
      That's why I'm here asking questions. So I can "sell the damn thing." (The most effective way possible ...)

      However if certain approaches have been over-used, it only makes sense to find another angle.
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      "Each problem has hidden in it an opportunity so powerful that it literally dwarfs the problem. The greatest success stories were created by people who recognized a problem and turned it into an opportunity."―Joseph Sugarman
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      • Profile picture of the author ThomasOMalley
        Originally Posted by Jonathan 2.0 View Post

        That's why I'm here asking questions. So I can “sell the damn thing.” (The most effective way possible ...)

        However if certain approaches have been over-used, it only makes sense to find another angle.
        Basic copywriting tactics have stood the test of time...just read any good copywriting book...you need a strong offer, strong headline, good story, good guarantee, good P.S.

        Use good swipe files as well.
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        • Profile picture of the author Mark Andrews
          Banned
          The whole point of copywriting is to make it interesting to your target market. If it fails to generate interest, it's likely you're not going to see much in the way of sales.

          And it's this which separates out the best copywriters from your usual run of the mill or newbie 'copywriters' who believe there's nothing more to this craft than simply flinging a few words on a page and hoping it will help to persuade people into making a purchasing decision. Whatever the call to action is.

          The IM niche or Internet marketing market (potential buyers or customers) are pretty much blind to all of these typically long sales letters but they do not make up the whole market. Just because you yourself are immersed in this market doesn't mean everyone else is immersed in this market.

          Hone your copy chops, stand out as different with an exciting unique approach and even in this niche - you can lift the blinkers off the eyes of many to get them to take the desired call to action you desire.

          A lot of this perceived problem comes back to boredom in the IM niche. People often in the IM niche want instant gratification, they want it easy, everything to be handed to them on a plate, with as little effort on their part as possible. Fortunately, this is not the way real business operates in the outside world.

          Good copywriting, copywriting which emotionally engages with the market and solves a problem will be around for a very long time to come. The medium might change just as everything else changes in this world and comes and goes in cycles. What is fashionable one day might not be the fad of choice the next day. And so we go round the marketing merry go round all over again.

          Dare to be different, look for new angles, try out new platforms, find what works for you and more importantly what works for your target market. The world out there, the market, it's a lot bigger than many in the IM niche give credit to.

          All this talk of long form sales letters are dead is just a load of hot air. You cannot squeeze the entire market mindset into the same box or way of thinking.

          There will always be those who prefer long form sales letters.

          There will always be those who prefer video.

          There will always be those who prefer TV advertising.

          There's enough room in the market for all of these approaches. The important thing is not to stick to just any one single approach but to tap into a multi-pronged advertising and marketing approach which seeks to connect your goods, products, and services for your clients to as many potential buyers as possible within the entire length and breadth of the market.

          Long form sales copy is but just one approach.

          Best,


          Mark Andrews
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