Fiction recommendations?

59 replies
Hi all,

It's been recommended to me that I should take a break from reading my instructional copywriting books and shift to reading some good fiction for a while. Perhaps some short stories.

Any recommendations?

Thanks,
-Rob
#fiction #recommendations
  • Profile picture of the author Micah Medina
    I like Elmore Leonard, really crisp writing and descriptions.

    I also like Guy Gavriel Kay, for pretty much the exact opposite reasons - his stuff is really ornate and engages all your senses.
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  • Profile picture of the author Andrew Gould
    Steve Copywriter (I'm not convinced that's his real last name) started this thread a few weeks ago which should be helpful:

    http://www.warriorforum.com/copywrit...1076-noir.html
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    Andrew Gould

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    • Profile picture of the author perryny
      Originally Posted by Andrew Gould View Post

      Steve Copywriter (I'm not convinced that's his real last name) started this thread a few weeks ago which should be helpful:

      http://www.warriorforum.com/copywrit...1076-noir.html
      Thanks Andrew. I've read that thread. Seems a lot of copywriters seem to be drawn to Sci-Fi. Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card and Dune by Frank Herbert were also recommended to me recently (Ender's Game is on it's way to me from Amazon as we speak.)

      This was another thread with some recommendations: http://www.warriorforum.com/copywrit...pywriters.html

      A long time ago, I heard a recording by Frank Kern where he said something to the effect of, "If you want to learn how to write compelling copy, read this..." He seemed really passionate about the author and the books. Wish I wrote it down. Might have been from Mass Control, but I'm not sure. If you know the books he's such a fan of, please let me know.

      Last week during his TalkMarketingNow show, Bond Halbert suggested reading some short stories from Hemingway. Although he admitted he's not much of a Hemingway fan himself.

      Just looking to collect some more recommendations - hopefully from copywriters who are as passionate about their favorite works of fiction as Kern seemed to be about his.
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    • Originally Posted by Andrew Gould View Post

      Steve Copywriter (I'm not convinced that's his real last name) started this thread a few weeks ago which should be helpful:

      http://www.warriorforum.com/copywrit...1076-noir.html
      Lol,

      And for years I had no idea what I wanted to do.

      Then it suddenly hit me...

      Steve
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  • Profile picture of the author Micah Medina
    Thanks for digging that link up, Andrew. You're an MVP around here. Looks like I've got some more titles to throw on my "to read" list.
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  • Profile picture of the author Pusateri
    Ray Bradbury. He packs a lot in a small space.
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  • Profile picture of the author colmodwyer
    Cormac McCarthy's Blood Meridian.

    Best novel I ever read.
    Second time I've heard that... need to put it on my reading list. Watched film adaptation of "The Road" which is excellent.

    I'm reading "The Shining" right now, there's a reference to Caples' "They Laughed When I Sat Down at the Piano" ad in it. Anything by the King and other high-grossing novel writers aught to be worth reading.

    Colm
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  • Profile picture of the author staffelseo
    Try Paulo Coelho's books, though some of them were not fictional and related to a true to life stories but then It can help you a lot to meditate or reflect. He does have good books though and I really like the way he approach every scene. Really worth buying books!
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  • Profile picture of the author sabreena
    Hello,

    The best novel i ever read is "
    Illusion"....!
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  • Profile picture of the author arfasaira
    An oldie but a goldie....

    Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte - real literature classic. I first read this when I was just 14, and nearly 20 years later, its still one of my golden favourites. Perhaps not to everyone's taste, and I think its more for us women...

    I've watched several adaptations of Bronte's tale over the years too...

    And when I'm feeling a bit low, nothing cheers me up more than Roald Dahl...and NO, we aren't talking his adult books...

    Put it this way, I recently bought the entire children's collection on CD for my son...and it's one of my guilty pleasures

    Great stuff if you want to bring out the kid in you.

    Other than that, love John Grisham's thrillers and Terry Pratchett's Discworld series.

    And I seriously enjoyed reading Jurassic Park - the movie was a let down compared to the book which is in fact, a thoroughly fantastic and riveting read.
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    • Profile picture of the author EricMN
      Originally Posted by arfasaira View Post

      And I seriously enjoyed reading Jurassic Park - the movie was a let down compared to the book which is in fact, a thoroughly fantastic and riveting read.
      Interesting tie to copywriting and finding the "big idea" for your copy here. . .

      Fantasy writing phenom, Brandon Sanderson (who in 4 years went from the slush pile to NYT Best Seller with mind boggling book deals) was once asked, "Is there anything you read or came across that made you say 'I wish I came up with that'?"

      His response was: Jurassic Park. The idea that you could extract dinosaur DNA from mosquitos? The story practically writes itself!

      I've never actually read it, but the film was a favourite of mine as a kid. I might have to check it out.
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    • Originally Posted by arfasaira View Post

      An oldie but a goldie....

      Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte - real literature classic. I first read this when I was just 14, and nearly 20 years later, its still one of my golden favourites. Perhaps not to everyone's taste, and I think its more for us women...

      I've watched several adaptations of Bronte's tale over the years too...

      And when I'm feeling a bit low, nothing cheers me up more than Roald Dahl...and NO, we aren't talking his adult books...

      Put it this way, I recently bought the entire children's collection on CD for my son...and it's one of my guilty pleasures

      Great stuff if you want to bring out the kid in you.

      Other than that, love John Grisham's thrillers and Terry Pratchett's Discworld series.

      And I seriously enjoyed reading Jurassic Park - the movie was a let down compared to the book which is in fact, a thoroughly fantastic and riveting read.

      `
      Bronte!? God, those sisters are depressing!

      Try Dicken's great expectations. Heck of a book if you ask me.

      For a more modern feel, try Stephen King or Dean Koontz. Both incredible writers if you ask me. For a big read, try Ayn Rand's The Fountainhead. Love the story.

      Ben.
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  • Profile picture of the author EricMN
    I've only read some of his short stories, but I'm going to say anything by Neil Gaiman.

    He's been successful in pretty much everything he writes from novels to short stories to comics to scripts and has won numerous awards.

    He has a very unique voice. I picked up American Gods and will be reading it shortly.

    Also Chuck Palahniuk.
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  • Profile picture of the author RickDuris
    I like to read movie scripts. It's an art to convey so much in so few words. - Rick Duris
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  • Profile picture of the author sanjaypande
    Forget short stories.

    Read absolutely anything by PG Wodehouse. I recommend absolutely anything with the character "Lord Ickenham".

    I've never seen anyone else entertain, engage and show prowess over language at the same time; and comedy written with such class and poise.

    He puts Shakespeare to shame (And Douglas Adams is in consensus with me on this - He mentioned it in the incomplete "The Salmon of Doubt")

    And ... there are short stories as well.
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  • Profile picture of the author Pusateri
    A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole. Won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 1980.

    "A green hunting cap squeezed the top of the fleshy balloon of a head. The green earflaps, full of large ears and uncut hair and the fine bristles that grew in the ears themselves, stuck out on either side like turn signals indicating two directions at once. Full, pursed lips protruded beneath the bushy black moustache and, at their corners, sank into little folds filled with disapproval and potato chip crumbs. In the shadow under the green visor of the cap Ignatius J. Reilly's supercilious blue and yellow eyes looked down upon the other people waiting under the clock at the D.H. Holmes department store, studying the crowd of people for signs of bad taste in dress. Several of the outfits, Ignatius noticed, were new enough and expensive enough to be properly considered offenses against taste and decency. Possession of anything new or expensive only reflected a person's lack of theology and geometry; it could even cast doubts upon one's soul."
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    • Hi Pusateri,

      It is an outstandingly brilliant book.

      Years ago I asked John Carlton for his list of favorite fiction books.

      And this was one of his top recommendations.

      It's superbly written, incredibly funny and a copywriters "dream" book because of the prose.

      The sad thing is - the author couldn't get it published. And in despair committed suicide.

      His mother took the manuscript to just about every publisher (she too got turned down countless times) but with sheer determination and in memory of her son eventually got it published.

      And as you said it won a Pulitzer. And became a classic. To date it's sold over 1.5 million copies.

      I guess the lesson for all copywriters and writers is - never give up.

      Steve
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      • Profile picture of the author Pusateri
        Originally Posted by Steve Copywriter View Post


        I guess the lesson for all copywriters and writers is - never give up.
        Toole wrote it while serving in the army, teaching English to recruits in Puerto Rico during the Cuban middle crisis. They were expecting to be nuked any day, or attacked from the hills by guerillas lead by Cuban officers. So another lesson is that a writer/copywriter finds a way to work, no matter what's going on around him.
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  • Profile picture of the author PureInk
    James Ellroy - he's amazing and really captures the underworld of LA in the 1940s and 1950s. He said in his Desert Island Discs interview that he doesn't watch TV, go online or read newspapers so he can completely immerse himself in writing about this era. Pretty dedicated!
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  • Profile picture of the author MikeyDreamboat
    George R. R. Martin. By the time you're finished with "A Dance With Dragons" any copy you do on food is going to improve by about 95%.
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  • Profile picture of the author Robert_Rand
    Sydney Sheldon... incredible storyteller. Try "The Master of the Game" or "A Stranger in the Mirror".

    Even though he didn't start writing novels until his mid 50's, there aren't too many people who've sold more books than him. There's a reason for that.
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    • William Faulkner (The Sound and the Fury)
      Jack Kerouac (On the Road)
      Kurt Vonnegut (Slaughterhouse-Five)
      Yann Martel (Life of Pi)

      All completely different styles, all straight to the guts.
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  • Profile picture of the author thatkeywordguy
    The Dark Tower

    though they arent short...
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  • Profile picture of the author sethczerepak
    Stephen King, Capote, Chuck Palanuik
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  • Profile picture of the author tomokun
    Brandon Sanderson is a definite must if you are into sci-fi fantasy.

    Rather than trying to make something old new, he creates entirely new worlds with new rules unlike what anyone else has come up with.

    Magic takes on a whole new meaning, and it's not just new, it's also GOOD and internally consistent.
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  • Profile picture of the author staffelseo
    You won't be disappointed by "The Night Circus" -- nothing like the Twilight crap that's so idolized these days!
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    • Profile picture of the author Darion
      Originally Posted by staffelseo View Post

      You won't be disappointed by "The Night Circus" -- nothing like the Twilight crap that's so idolized these days!
      I second The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern! Just finished this a week ago, and it's still lingering in my thoughts. The story had just the right amounts of 'dark' and 'whimsical' to make it a compelling read.
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      • Profile picture of the author ERPLeadsWriter
        Well I'm genuinely surprised. As a writer, I actually take my practice in fiction more seriously than I do in business (not that I don't see the importance of the latter as it's the only way I get a stable income to even facilitate my more novelist ambitions :p). Hence, I'm kinda happy to see a more fiction-oriented discussion here.

        With that said, you should try and pay attention to your preferred genres. It helps in the search. Judging from your recent post, I think it's pretty clear that you like science-fiction.

        As much as I'm more of a fantasy buff (just recently I finished reading an M:TG-related novel called The Purifying Fire ), I've heard the Canticle of Leibowitz is a must-read for any sci-fi fan.
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  • Profile picture of the author James Foster
    One of the guys Kern recommended was Charles Bukowski. One of his more popular books was Post Office.
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  • Profile picture of the author OliviaHoang
    "The Age of Innocence" by Edith Wharton. It won a Pulitzer Prize.

    Wharton was called the American Master of Storytelling for a reason. She writes so passionately.
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  • Profile picture of the author stuff2
    [DELETED]
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    • Profile picture of the author Robert_Rand
      Originally Posted by stuff2 View Post

      The WSO forum
      lol...

      Seriously though... I'm a little surprised more people haven't mentioned authors like Danielle Steel, James Patterson, Harold Robbins, Sydney Sheldon, Dean Koontz... and other authors who have sold hundreds of millions of books.

      It's like talking about copywriters and not mentioning those who have generated the most sales and/or highest converting ads/letters...

      And oh yeah... Rob, as far as short stories... "Anthem" by Ayn Rand is solid. It's a quick read; only about 90 pages, and very applicable to the times we find ourselves in.
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      • Profile picture of the author Pusateri
        Originally Posted by Robert_Rand View Post

        lol...

        Seriously though... I'm a little surprised more people haven't mentioned authors like Danielle Steel, James Patterson, Harold Robbins, Sydney Sheldon, Dean Koontz... and other authors who have sold hundreds of millions of books.

        It's like talking about copywriters and not mentioning those who have generated the most sales and/or highest converting ads/letters...
        Copywriters are a high openness/high IQ demographic. I don't think most would find that sort of mass market candy stimulating. Not that you can't learn something about appealing to the masses from reading it, but that's not what this thread is about.
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        • Profile picture of the author Robert_Rand
          Originally Posted by Pusateri View Post

          Copywriters are a high openness/high IQ demographic. I don't think most would find that sort of mass market candy stimulating. Not that you can't learn something about appealing to the masses from reading it, but that's not what this thread is about.
          Yeah I hear ya... And that is a good point. Although you are quite the copywriter elitist aren't you? haha jk...

          I suppose I was twisting the thread a little I guess I was just trying to point out that there is a lot of value to be gained for a copywriter by reading mainstream fiction.

          I realize now that isn't what the OP asked.
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          • Profile picture of the author perryny
            Holy Smokes. I thought this thread died on the vine weeks ago.

            Thanks all for some truly great recommendations and thoughts. And thanks James for recalling Kern's recommendation for Charles Bukowski.

            This should keep me busy for quite a while. Now I've just got to keep my promise to myself to spend as much time writing as I do reading and I should see some quality stuff start to happen.

            And by the way, I finished Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card several weeks ago. Fastest I've ever finished a book. Great stuff and highly recommended.

            Thanks again everyone,
            -Rob
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  • Profile picture of the author tjcreation
    Terry Pratchett's Discworld - it will open your mind to so many possibilities.

    Ed McBain's 87th Precinct novels for police procedurals - think orderly.

    Arthur Conan Doyle - Sherlock Holmes (not on TV) - still great writing.
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  • Profile picture of the author Alex Ceskavich
    A friend of mine got me hooked on Harlequin romance novels.

    They help, no bull****.

    - Alex
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  • Profile picture of the author queen bee
    Paulo Coelho would be my suggestion ..
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  • Profile picture of the author MikeMarin
    Halbert recommended the first Ian Flemming book, casino royal and the Travis McGee Novel Series
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    • Profile picture of the author MikeHumphreys
      Early James Patterson books like Kiss The Girls, Along Came A Spider, Jack & Jill are great story-telling. His current offerings stink IMHO.

      After years of reading everything he wrote, I started noticing they weren't nearly as good -- especially his work with co-authors.

      Then he produced a steaming pile of poo called "I, Alex Cross" and I stopped reading his books completely. I felt like he had changed gears and was all about how many books he could crank out each year.

      Case in point, according to Wikipedia, Patterson is doing 12 books this year (8 with co-authors) alone. Most fiction authors do 1-2 books on average per year.

      Lately, I've been reading a lot of Brad Thor, Vince Flynn, John Sanford, and Robert Ludlum. Ludlum's Bourne Conspiracy series has been made into movies, although the movies deviate from the book significantly in spots.

      Ludlum passed away in 2001, so another author named Eric Van Lustbader took over writing the Bourne series. His writing style is awesome, so I'd recommend reading his Bourne series offerings as well.
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      • Profile picture of the author Robert_Rand
        Originally Posted by MikeHumphreys View Post

        Early James Patterson books like Kiss The Girls, Along Came A Spider, Jack & Jill are great story-telling. His current offerings stink IMHO.

        After years of reading everything he wrote, I started noticing they weren't nearly as good -- especially his work with co-authors.

        Then he produced a steaming pile of poo called "I, Alex Cross" and I stopped reading his books completely. I felt like he had changed gears and was all about how many books he could crank out each year.

        Case in point, according to Wikipedia, Patterson is doing 12 books this year (8 with co-authors) alone. Most fiction authors do 1-2 books on average per year.
        Yeah, I noticed that too. Last book I read of his was Honeymoon and it was weak. The underlying passion and attention to detail just wasn't there.
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      • Profile picture of the author ERPLeadsWriter
        Originally Posted by MikeHumphreys View Post

        Ludlum passed away in 2001, so another author named Eric Van Lustbader took over writing the Bourne series. His writing style is awesome, so I'd recommend reading his Bourne series offerings as well.
        Whoa, Lustbader got a hold of the Bourne series? I mean I've only read one of his books (Jian) but I'm guessing he's getting more popular since I last heard of him. I even checked the guy's wiki and it says he writes fantasy. I swear to God, that wasn't there. Has his style changed from his older novels?
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        • Profile picture of the author MikeHumphreys
          Originally Posted by ERPLeadsWriter View Post

          Whoa, Lustbader got a hold of the Bourne series? I mean I've only read one of his books (Jian) but I'm guessing he's getting more popular since I last heard of him. I even checked the guy's wiki and it says he writes fantasy. I swear to God, that wasn't there. Has his style changed from his older novels?
          No clue.

          I've only read the Bourne series novels that Van Lustbader wrote. Like any new author, I borrowed one of them from the local library to read.

          I do this with any author I'm not familiar with.

          My rationale being if the author stinks (in my opinion), then I didn't waste any of my money buying their book.

          Since then, I've bought a number of the newer Bourne series written by Van Lustbader. I haven't gotten around to reading any of his other works yet.

          Sorry I can't be of more help.

          Mike
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    • Profile picture of the author perryny
      Originally Posted by MikeMarin View Post

      Halbert recommended the first Ian Flemming book, casino royal and the Travis McGee Novel Series
      I'll give you three guesses who Halbert named his boy Bond after.
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  • Profile picture of the author kimfal
    Hi,
    If you like a little romance I would recommend you read "Decadent Tales" by Maria De Angeles and I found John Locke's series entertaining
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  • Profile picture of the author DavidG
    "The Things They Carried" - Tim O'Brien


    Powerful read about the War in Vietnam.

    It really connects with you in such a way that you FEEL like you are there.

    If that doesn't make sense - just read a couple of chapters and I think you'll understand.



    David
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  • Profile picture of the author knish
    Here's a list of The Best SciFi Novels Ever ranked by Reddit:

    The Best SciFi Novels Ever

    Enjoy!
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  • Profile picture of the author sabinavarga
    Great recommendations, I've made a long must-read list.

    My recommendation is my all-time favorite: Hermann Hesse - The Glass Bead Game. It's not an easy read, but it's so beautiful and rewarding!
    I've yet to read by Hesse Steppenwolf and Siddhartha. I heard they're pretty amazing reads as well.
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  • Profile picture of the author SoftWarp
    William Gibson is the man. He envisioned our cyber world better and more entertaining and precise than anybody else, including branding, trend setting and all the other stuff. Most likely the funniest and smartest stuff for any online marketer there to read.
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  • Profile picture of the author Elluminati
    When I need a mental break I start reading old school lit, one of my favs being The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas.
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  • Profile picture of the author Viramara
    Arundhati Roy "The God of Small Things"
    It's a Pulitzer winning novel, very beautifully detailed, so extraordinary and out of this world! Arundhati is a master of telling an ordinary stuff into a very unique point of view.
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    Those who have time and search for a better time will lose time (Sufi Proverb)
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  • Profile picture of the author bloomingrose
    I love this thread. Maybe this is why I am having so much trouble writing fiction on my Kindle, I am not reading enough. It is easy to get obsessed with IM - with no one profiting. That The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern is now on my list - it has almost a thousand thumbs up on Amazon. Not that great literature is just a popularity contest: check out [U]Confessions of a Teenage Jesus Jerk[U] - Jehovah's Witness kid growing up in SF in the 60's - poignant and hilarious. Anne Tyler writes wonderfully about relationships: Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant is considered her best novel, Accidental Tourist also had a movie made. And apparently men really like her portrayal of male characters.

    For "I'm not putting it down, not even to go to the bathroom" greatness read "Angela's Ashes." No life should be lived without reading Carson McCullers: A Heart is a Lonely Hunter

    MCCullers wrote some great short stories too - as did Truman Capote. Breakfast at Tiffany's is great not at all like the watered down movie that was made, although that was fun too.

    Enjoy your summer!
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    • Profile picture of the author JakeDaly
      A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole is a damn good book, if not a masterpiece.

      EDIT: Whoops! Pusateri beat me to it by a good 3 months.
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  • Profile picture of the author sparky
    Hi Steve, can't say I've read any of your copy, but most sales letters I've read over the past couple of years have been total fiction. The kindest thing you can say about some of the writers of that stuff is that they're totally divorced from reality.

    Anyway it would help if you gave some indication of the genres you're interested in

    regards

    Tony
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    • Profile picture of the author perryny
      My good buddy and very talented copywriter, Omar Khafagy just posted his own work of fiction - a very entertaining, very well written short story with tanks, evil nuns and knife wielding, cage fighting lesbians.

      Home run, Omar!

      Check it out right here, right now: Story 1: Out Of The Tanks
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      • Profile picture of the author Colin Theriot
        Originally Posted by Micah Medina View Post

        Elmore Leonard
        Originally Posted by Pusateri View Post

        Ray Bradbury.
        Originally Posted by EricMN View Post

        Neil Gaiman... Chuck Palahniuk.
        Originally Posted by sanjaypande View Post

        Douglas Adams
        Originally Posted by premiumonlinewriting View Post

        Kurt Vonnegut
        Originally Posted by tjcreation View Post

        Terry Pratchett
        Originally Posted by Elluminati View Post

        The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas.
        Agree 100% with all of the above. While I have enjoyed lots of literature, you asked specifically (kind of) in the context of being useful for copy.

        Here's why I think the above guys qualify:

        1. Elmore Leonard is a MASTER of realistic dialogue, delivered in a minimal, raw style that puts you right in the action. Insofar as a sales letter should have a voice putting forth a viewpoint in as few words as possible, EL is where to look.

        2. Ray Bradbury has a compactness and elegance that betrays the fact he used to spend up to a year working on a single story, distilling it down to it essence through repeated refinements. But Ray used those skills to tell ripping good yarns that are deeply moving despite brevity.

        3. Neil Gaiman's imagination is boundless, and I'm endlessly fascinated by the way he can take the more magical aspects of the fabled ancient past and integrate them into the mundane present.

        For Palanhiuk, the guy is visceral and direct and usually writes in first person. Which is great for copy because copy should be first person, too. If you want to learn how to tell stories that can kick you in the stomach with unpolished detail, he's a good read.

        4. Douglas Adams is probable more responsible for me thinking of wanting to maybe be a writer than anyone else. His manic style, his endless digressions, his imaginative worlds literally bristling with brilliance oozing out of every nook and cranny - if you can instill a shred of the enthusiasm and wonder that Adams could muster, and still deliver in his matter of fact "of course I am from space" attitude, you would do very well indeed.

        5. Kurt Vonnegut is a man after my own heart in that he managed to simultaneously be bleak and curmudgeonly and dark and fatalistic, but at the same time still capable of seeing the utter, undeniable beauty in the chaotic and harmful world we live in. He's like Mark Twain with all the Pollyanna "aw shucks" bull**** beat out of him. Which is literally true in Vonnegut's case. It was bombed out of his brain forever one night in Dresden.

        6. Terry Pratchett is one I recommend with hesitation. If you're into fantasy, and you like what Douglas Adams does for sci-fi, you will love Pratchett. But if you aren't it can feel like a giant in-joke that you're not really a part of. As pertains to copy, I think his best lesson is in how you can take an old trope and get much mileage out of it with a new spin. And also that you can be humorous and funny at the same EXACT time that you are being deathly serious.

        7. The Count of Monte Cristo is just the most badass tale of two fisted goddman revenge ever written. I don't know what it has to do with copy, but if Revenge, murder, piracy, hidden treasure, prison escapes, sword fights, etc is your kind of thing, wtf why haven't you read this until the pages fall out already?

        Some additional thoughts on fiction that is awesome but will also benefit copy, much as the previous poster mentioned Noir as a genre, I will support the close reading of the best of surviving pulp stories.

        Not just detective noir, but Sword and Sorcery, Weird Tales, Science Fantasy, Adventure Fiction, etc. Conan, Tarzan, Doc Savage, Allan Quartermain, etc.

        The reason I think these are good to study is because the market they were created in was sort of like proto-comic books. They needed to have instant and self-contained appeal, but also tie into upcoming episodes to keep people buying more issues. Much like we would love to do with blog posts and email messages.

        It's true the pulps can be lurid and even lowbrow, but there's no doubt that they are ripping yarns - plucking at our most basic psychology in an effort to get you wanting more. Anything you can read that does that has something to teach a copywriter.
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  • Profile picture of the author housewarrior
    I can recommend FableShop.net. It's the newest place to read and submit short stories.

    Norm

    Originally Posted by perryny View Post

    Hi all,

    It's been recommended to me that I should take a break from reading my instructional copywriting books and shift to reading some good fiction for a while. Perhaps some short stories.

    Any recommendations?

    Thanks,
    -Rob
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  • Profile picture of the author james kirk
    Libra and Cosmopolis by Don Dilillo
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    To your success!

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