Making $3,000 In 30 Days From Copywriting...

by abugah
29 replies
Perhaps this has been discussed before in this forum, I will appreciate the link.

However, what would you tell a new copy cub with decent writing skills that needs $3,000 desperately in the next 30 days?

He is ready to work 18 hours a day; can raise $100 maximum if it is needed at short notice. And his circumstances are such that he cannot take up a full-time copywriting position.

I would appreciate your advice. Practical tips, tricks, tactics that he can use.
#copywriting… #copywriting… #days #making
  • Profile picture of the author Hugh Thyer
    He could start by posting up some examples here. Who knows, an established copywriter might be looking for someone to write first drafts for them and may appreciate his help.
    Signature

    Ever wondered how copywriters work with their clients? I've answered that very question in detail-> www.salescomefirst.com
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5418703].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    @theOP: do you have a website? If you don't, consider making one with Google Sites, which is Free. Mine is on there and I keep it because it shows prospective clients that if I can save them a buck while still having something effective, I will.

    No hosting, domain name, or design costs there.

    All this site does is act as a credibility tool for you to send prospects to after you've spoken with them.

    Second, go on elance or odesk and find copywriting jobs. People seem to love the idea of getting a copywriter for cheap at these places. Fulfill their need. Use your free website to augment your profile.

    Third, know that it is not necessary to provide samples of what you've done in order to get new clients. The quality of the questions you ask will show your prospect whether or not you understand their business and can speak for them.

    Fourth, if you are willing to learn how to prospect (cold call), then read this. This is the quickest and most effective way to find new clients.

    Fifth, when you are actually able to get into a dialogue with a prospect, rather than the one-way bidding on a subcontractor site, get them to come up with a value for your services. They will always pay you more than you believe you're worth if you do it this way. What you would do for a $200 they will probably pay $1500 or more if you get them to value it correctly. Look at this post for an example of how to do it.

    If they say it, it's true. If you say it, you now have to defend it.

    Sixth, position yourself as a higher-value copywriter. Yes you know you're not at the top level like Mal the Copy Nazi or Mark Andrews (neither am I, for that matter--but I make thousands of dollars per project), making $2000 a page, but you are probably better than an article writer who gets paid a few cents a word. Read this and absorb it. Show it to your prospects. I do: sets them straight right away and qualifies them In or Out without me having to do anything. Insist on 50% down payment or 100% down payment. The world tends to take you at face value. Work, work, work to get to the level where you're getting the results you promise.

    Your goal of $3000 is easily achievable, even off a single project, if you are willing to put in the effort to uncover the right kind of prospect.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5418830].message }}
    • Assuming each "assignment" only earns $750.00.

      This lets them target virtually any business. And get quick decisions. And it won't takes ages to do the research, write and edit the promo's.

      They'll be doing "fast" but still very effective sales letters, postcard sequences, flyers, auto - responders, web copy etc, rather than 8-12 week major copywriting projects.

      (you mentioned the copywriter has "decent" but not exceptional skills - so it'll be easier for them to do smaller jobs).

      They need 4.

      And say it'll take 2 weeks to write them.

      So, they've got 2 weeks to get them.

      Easiest way is spend the $100 on a flyer.

      Just black and white and get as many as possible printed.

      Make them absolutely irresistible - the hook is getting the clients more revenue and profits incredibly quickly. This is solving their biggest problem in tough economic times.

      Create a sensational offer and a strong scarcity element.

      "to take advantage of this unique offer you must call within 48 hours"

      Choose the local clients they most want to work for.

      Deliver the flyers - and wait for the phone calls.


      Steve
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5419482].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Enueja
        [DELETED]
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5420098].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
          And to add further to what Steve said,
          target those offline businesses that have a client list.

          The easiest and fastest money for them is a letter to
          get their clients coming back.

          Those that have dropped off.

          It's also the easiest to write.

          Just gotta push the client to give a irresistible offer.

          Best,
          Ewen
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5420668].message }}
          • Very true Ewen,

            They would be the easiest letters to write getting the fastest response.

            And with the delighted clients - the copywriter should get stacks more work.

            Should be able to make at least $3,000 plus - part time - every month - not just one month.

            Bet he/she decides to become full time.


            Steve
            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5420815].message }}
          • Profile picture of the author MikeyDreamboat
            Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

            And to add further to what Steve said,
            target those offline businesses that have a client list.

            The easiest and fastest money for them is a letter to
            get their clients coming back.
            This sounds promising. How do you go about doing this? Just a phone book and some cold calling? Would we be avoiding big chain stores and looking for independently owned ones?

            I'll research this myself also, but any first hand information would be appreciated.
            Signature

            Premium writing at a discounted price being offered to Warrior Forum members. http://www.warriorforum.com/warriors...ml#post5426420

            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5426995].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author adammaxum
    Well, Kaniganj summed it up nicely. Follow his advice, and you'll have plenty of opportunity to make the 3k.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5420088].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Andrew Gould
    While they're implementing all the great advice from Jason, Steve, and Ewen, I'd give them something extra to work on:

    Originally Posted by abugah View Post

    decent writing skills
    There's hundreds, if not thousands, of writers with "decent" skills.

    So I'd have them spend at least an hour a day sharpening their abilities, making the transition from decent to excellent, then onto world-class.

    The better they become, the more everything they do stands out. And, in terms of marketing, the more they know, the more they'll be able to help themselves.

    And personally, I've found the saying "competence breeds confidence" to be 100% true for myself.
    Signature

    Andrew Gould

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5421268].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author RickDuris
    This may not be of much strategic or tactical help, but from a mindset perspective, it could make all the difference.

    When confronted with financial obstacles, here's what I've done:

    I multiplied what I needed by 10. So in your case, I'd focus on making $30,000 in 30 days.

    When you do this, three things happen:

    1. All the negatives voices in your head start screaming "It can't done! No way! It can't be done!"

    2. To quiet that inner negativity, what I do is ask "I know, I know it can't be done, but if it could be done, how would I do it?"

    3. At this point, I have my pad and paper or laptop handy because then I get a burst of ideas on how to make it happen.

    What normally happens is I don't hit my big goal, but I overshoot my smaller goal.

    - Rick Duris

    PS: Relayed from Tony Robbins.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5421333].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
      To pile on the "goodies" for the clients irresistible offer,
      you can use this as an example.

      You approach restaurants saying "my client has clients
      that would fit your ideal client and I'd like to send some
      your way on your quietest night"

      You explain that you need a great deal to offer them,
      otherwise it will not work.

      Then you do it for a day spa, and a hairstylist.

      Package up all these great deals and call it a Pamper Package worth
      X number of dollars in a gift card.

      Now you use that to get your clients customers to come in.

      You become the money man for your clients, not just a copywriter.

      It's a package deal.

      Now you're spreading your influence much wider and have more
      opportunities with these other business owners.

      Best,
      Ewen

      P.S. There are a number of these reactivation letters around to model from too,
      so you aren't starting from scratch, which means you are cranking them out fast.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5421434].message }}
      • If the person in question absolutely needs the cash by the end of the 30 days make sure they set up accounts now with Paypal and possibly Google Checkout.

        There will be a delay of several days with Paypal (and 10 days with Google Checkout) from payment to moving the money to their bank.
        Signature
        Marketing is not a battle of products. It is a battle of perceptions.
        - Jack Trout
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5421663].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author abugah
      Originally Posted by RickDuris View Post

      This may not be of much strategic or tactical help, but from a mindset perspective, it could make all the difference.

      When confronted with financial obstacles, here's what I've done:

      I multiplied what I needed by 10. So in your case, I'd focus on making $30,000 in 30 days.

      When you do this, three things happen:

      1. All the negatives voices in your head start screaming "It can't done! No way! It can't be done!"

      2. To quiet that inner negativity, what I do is ask "I know, I know it can't be done, but if it could be done, how would I do it?"

      3. At this point, I have my pad and paper or laptop handy because then I get a burst of ideas on how to make it happen.

      What normally happens is I don't hit my big goal, but I overshoot my smaller goal.

      - Rick Duris

      PS: Relayed from Tony Robbins.
      Thanks for this Rick.

      Aiming at $30,000 instead of $ 3,000 makes it almost guarantee that the target will be achieved. I guess the time may also be adjusted, to may be 27 days.

      When one gets conscious of the enormity of the goal, he thinks about it every minute he is awake, often will find himself forfeiting sleep, TV viewing, empty gossip and draining friendships. Which works in his favor and catapults him faster to the goal.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5427464].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author abugah
    Originally Posted by kaniganj View Post

    @theOP: do you have a website? If you don't, consider making one with Google Sites, which is Free. Mine is on there and I keep it because it shows prospective clients that if I can save them a buck while still having something effective, I will.

    No hosting, domain name, or design costs there.

    All this site does is act as a credibility tool for you to send prospects to after you've spoken with them.

    1. Wow... great insight here. I just saw your Google site, very impressive. I like the way you've displayed the Platinum Ezine expert author seal. I guess not many marketers know this credibility boosting strategy.


    Second, go on elance or odesk and find copywriting jobs. People seem to love the idea of getting a copywriter for cheap at these places. Fulfill their need. Use your free website to augment your profile.

    2. Great tip.Just wondering would focusing on one job board be better than two or three?

    Third, know that it is not necessary to provide samples of what you've done in order to get new clients. The quality of the questions you ask will show your prospect whether or not you understand their business and can speak for them.

    3. I was copy cub sometime back for a guy who got jobs on elance. One of the problem was that some of the clients, are naive, do not provide information and the quality of questions you ask may not ring a bell in their minds. What would be your advice on this?

    Fourth, if you are willing to learn how to prospect (cold call), then I can help you for Free. This is the quickest and most effective way to find new clients. Just PM me.

    4. I have done that already.

    Fifth, when you are actually able to get into a dialogue with a prospect, rather than the one-way bidding on a subcontractor site, get them to come up with a value for your services. They will always pay you more than you believe you're worth if you do it this way. What you would do for a $200 they will probably pay $1500 or more if you get them to value it correctly. Look at this post for an example of how to do it.

    5. Great thinking. I have noticed that in live you get what you ask for. If you quote $400 you get paid exactly that. However, a client will not tell you that the budget for that job was $3000.


    If they say it, it's true. If you say it, you now have to defend it.

    Sixth, position yourself as a higher-value copywriter. Yes you know you're not at the top level like Mal the Copy Nazi or Mark Andrews (neither am I, for that matter--but I make thousands of dollars per project), making $2000 a page, but you are probably better than an article writer who gets paid a few cents a word. Read this and absorb it. Show it to your prospects. I do: sets them straight right away and qualifies them In or Out without me having to do anything. Insist on 50% down payment or 100% down payment. The world tends to take you at face value. Work, work, work to get to the level where you're getting the results you promise.

    6. Yes this is another great one. Asking for a down-payment, immediately tells the client you are not desperate.Just wondering are there exceptions? Fortune 500 companies for instance...or when it is Copy Nazi hiring.

    Your goal of $3000 is easily achievable, even off a single project, if you are willing to put in the effort to uncover the right kind of prospect.
    Perhaps you could expound on this one- Your checklist for pre-qualifying clients; statements clients can make that will make run for the hills; clients you never touch, even with 10-foot pole; industries you abhor and those to you love.

    Thanks, I appreciate your input.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5424446].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    1. Ezinearticles has gone through a downswing lately...when I made the site it had a better reputation. But still, anything that adds credibility for the typical reader is a plus.

    Rudy Guiliani shared in On Leadership a story of when he was getting experience clerking for a judge. At some point he prepped a brief and the judge scolded him by saying, "I don't want just enough proof: I want a preponderance of proof."

    Set up an avalanche of credibility to overwhelm your visitors into thinking, "I've gotta talk to this person" -- or, since the time to show this website to prospects is after you've spoken with them, "I'm now, more than ever, assured that this is the writer I should be working with!"

    2. You should be able to get free memberships on several job boards. Keep your pipeline full by continuously applying for work--but to do this, you'll have to juggle the few opportunities the free memberships will allow you to pursue. This is why your best chance is to work with several job boards simultaneously.

    Go after opportunities:

    * for $501 or more (you don't want to waste your valuable connects on low-dollar work; and, when you do get work, you want it to be for decent pay)

    * posted by a credible client--verified payment, has used the board before and spent at least $200 on it, and has an award ratio of greater than 50%

    * that fit into your target market/topics of choice.

    This will protect you from wasting your time on prospects who never buy, don't have the budget, or are flakes.

    3. In my PM to you, I asked what you like to talk about all day. The answer will focus you on a target market, if you don't already have one. Your natural enthusiasm for the subject, as well as the knowledge you've picked up in your interest, will convey your credibility to the prospect. Only those people who have bothered to learn the jargon of the field are able to competently use it. Poseurs are quickly revealed.

    As for "fit", see 6, below. If the prospect can't tell you what they want, you can't work for them. Simple.

    4. PM replied to.

    5. Looks like you "get it" about pricing. Don't push prospects about price: get them to tell you what they believe, and then adjust as necessary or qualify Out. Quicker and less stressful all around.

    A nice person on the forum posted Kevin Halbert's post on hiring a copywriter. I now forward this to my prospects. If they understand and agree with it, we can move forward on the terms explained in the post. If not, then we're not a fit. Bargain basement prospects hunting for the lowest price can go to fiverr.

    6. As a sales trainer, my "fit" equation is like a three-legged stool.

    Leg 1: Need

    If the prospect has no urgent, emotional need for what I provide, then we're not a fit. I'd rather find people who badly need what I have to offer than try to push someone into accepting my services.

    Leg 2: Budget

    If the prospect cannot afford my services, and no other satisfactory arrangement can be made, then they qualify Out.

    Leg 3: Personality

    This is most important. One bad client can ruin your life. If the prospect gives off signals that they are unlikely to stick to an Up Front Contract, then we're not a fit. If they won't agree to certain terms (such as a fixed number of 'rounds' for writing and revision--which could otherwise go on forever as they get their next door neighbor, dog and high school guidance counselor involved to give their oh-so-qualified input on the copy) then we're not a fit. Any number of 'alarm bells' that ring unease or serious concern into your gut, and that you cannot resolve by directly confronting the prospect about, could be cause for qualifying them Out.

    As for your favorite topics or fields, that's up to you.

    If one of the legs is weak or missing, the stool will fall over when you try to sit on it...indicating that your project will almost certainly implode.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5424621].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author debml
    I've been lurking for a while, and while I'm not a copywriter, there is an incredible amount of gold here for anyone involved in sales.

    Your "what" is clearly defined - "how" seems to be elusive. Great tactics have been suggested. Only you know which of them you will truly commit to actually do, and if you aren't going to actually do it, it doesn't matter how compelling the tactic is.

    I know this may not even qualify as sales 101 - many people I work with have found it useful. Admittedly, I'm not qualified to make any assumptions regarding your market - and, I recognize my assumptions probably are not accurate. Hopefully you already have this information.

    Goal: $3000 Income
    Average sale per project: $750 = 4 projects
    Closing Ratio: 1 sale for every 3 proposals given = 12 proposals

    How are you going to reach the prospects necessary to give 12 proposals?

    Cold calling (old fashioned in person) - 1 prospect per 25 approaches = 300 Cold Calls
    Telemarketing - 1 prospect per 50 approaches = 600 conversations
    Direct Mail - 1% response rate = 1200 mail pieces

    As previously stated, I don't know what assumptions would be accurate for your market.

    There's an old sales manager adage that says, "sales people lie; numbers don't." I've never met anyone, myself included, who likes tracking their sales activity... and, what people often find when they do - what is measured gets done.

    The biggest advantage I see you have is your copywriting skills. I was talking with an associate of mine yesterday, and she was telling me about a meeting she had with someone regarding SEO for her website. She couldn't answer my question, "$400/month - what do you get for that?"
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5425045].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author John Galt
      Originally Posted by debml View Post


      How are you going to reach the prospects necessary to give 12 proposals?

      There's an old sales manager adage that says, "sales people lie; numbers don't." I've never met anyone, myself included, who likes tracking their sales activity... and, what people often find when they do - what is measured gets done.
      This is damn good advice. Watching your numbers like a hawk makes your goal real. Personally, I've found it more effective to focus on "daily numbers" than a dollar amount.

      Now, on a more practical note, you said that you've tried cold calling, right? How did that work out for you? It's far from efficient, but calling is the most effective way of getting clients... short budget or otherwise.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5431465].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Favion
    I think he can get the sum from freelance copy writing work if he combines multiple resources together. For example, he can post his service here, apply for freelance copy writing work in big freelance marketplaces around and generate income.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5425096].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author BurntOut254
    Rick's advice is on the money.

    But even more so, the idea is to network. Brian Mcleod said this recently.

    Another idea is to launch a WSO. It would be easy if there's some useful information someone is willing to share or create. For less $100 you could launch it.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5432461].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author sanjaypande
    Personally, I don't like pressure (even self-inflicted). It works for some people, it doesn't for some.

    Lot's of creative ideas up above, so here's a twist.

    Your budget - 100 bucks.
    Your objective - $3000

    1. We need to make the best of the 100, so let's see how we can "leverage" other people.

    Who services businesses?
    - Accountants who do business taxes
    - Corporate Lawyers
    - Commercial Real Estate Agents
    - Business/Commercial banking
    - SEO/Social Media and other hoopla
    - etc etc etc

    You can try and get a JV proposal with one of these going. You can even connect two of them and be the conduit of business.

    Send 100 letters to prospects for a JV. Printing and mailing shouldn't be more than a 100 bucks (or you can call them to save money. You're inviting them for a deal - it's not soliciting business. Position yourself correctly).

    Let's just say you talk your accountant into mailing their business on a social media marketing offer (You don't really need to know how to do this or even have a social media marketing company).

    Your accountant agrees to help you send 100 letters on his behalf with his endorsement for a 20% cut of the deal. You offer something for say as low as $1997 setup fee and $997 a month to your accountants clients who already spend that kind of money on advertising (Important: Your accountant knows their expenses, but he will not be able to disclose the numbers. He can choose them for you though, since he's the one mailing them on your behalf).

    Say, you close 2 deals in a 100.

    How hard would it be for you to turn around and find someone to service it for you. You can call ANY local SEO or social media consultant and tell them - I've got 2 clients who want to pay you. Do you do seo? social media? blah blah.

    How much?

    Let's just say, you'll have them lining up to work with you.

    Even after all expenses paid, I think you should be pretty close to your goal. In fact if you've played your cards right, you could end up with some residual income from the commissions you get 2nd month onwards. You're happy, your accountant is happy.

    Rinse and repeat. First with another service with your accountant then with others.

    You can do this with ANY service that businesses buy.

    2. How about becoming an ad agency. Easier than you think

    Call yourself one and you're one. Yes, it's that easy. Now call businesses who advertise. All you need to do is pick up the paper, read the ad, get in touch.

    "Hey, I see you advertise in ____. How would you like to save 10% on your advertising?"

    How many places do your advertise in?

    When you talk to the paper, magazine ... tell them you're and agency and ask them what their standard agency discount is - It's usually 17%-18% and you can even negotiate rates etc. But, the agency discount is so standard, you don't even need to argue.

    Find out what the ad space costs, ask your client how much they paid.

    Even if you take the same spot at the same rate, you still get a 17% discount. Cut the client a 10% break and pocket 7%.

    If you can negotiate rates, you'll pocket more. Everything is negotiable. Magazines are easier then newspapers usually.

    You can use your 100 bucks to contact prospective clients via mail. Cut out the ad, call the newspaper/magazine and find out how much. Tell them you're an ad agency and want to place a similar size ad.

    3. Who hires copywriters?

    Direct mailers and online marketers. Very few brick and mortar businesses even have a clue. So, you'd be better off going where they're already doing it.

    Pick a niche.

    Find direct mailers. There are many places you can find them including in the SRDS (free access at your local library). Don't have access and don't want to spend the money. Go find a local subscriber (and local ad agency) and ask them if they have any older issues of the SRDS lying around that they want to sell for scrap. You should be able to get them for 10-20 bucks (This tip came straight from Ted Nicholas btw).

    Pick 100 of them and send them a letter. You only need one of them to choose to work with you.

    You do want to solicit them via direct mail so they know you're capable.

    phew ... It's late and I'm tired.

    Even though there's tons more in this restless brain of mine, I think this is enough to at least get your head spinning/buzzing which is what I believe the OP intended.
    Signature

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5433214].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author debml
      Originally Posted by sanjaypande;

      [I

      3. Who hires copywriters?[/I]

      Direct mailers and online marketers. Very few brick and mortar businesses even have a clue. So, you'd be better off going where they're already doing it.
      I agree most brick and mortar business owners probably are not aware of the many ways a copywriter may be able to help their business. I don't think that necessarily means they are not a prospect.

      Personally, I don't lie awake at night thinking about my social media strategy or if my website has achieved maximum optimization. I'm worrying about how to get more clients... How to increase revenue... How to improve the bottom line... NOW! (although yesterday may have been somewhat more convenient.)

      Show a business owner you can do that, and I really don't think they'll care what you call yourself.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5438124].message }}
      • Originally Posted by debml View Post

        I agree most brick and mortar business owners probably are not aware of the many ways a copywriter may be able to help their business. I don't think that necessarily means they are not a prospect.
        Some local businesses will know copywriting but you are correct that most will not. It's better to position yourself as a marketing consultant or an expert in their niche than as a copywriter.

        That said, for writers that just want to deal with clients that know copy, there is plenty of opportunity. For example, don't forget b2b marketers in your own town. B2b is crying for good copywriters.

        Well, maybe not crying, but possibly quiet sobbing.
        Signature
        Marketing is not a battle of products. It is a battle of perceptions.
        - Jack Trout
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5440810].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author thetrafficguy
    Find clients who you know you can improve their ads (like google adwords), the copy on their site, their sales process, etc.

    Find those that are currently spending money on advertising. Then approach them and offer them to improve their stuff risk free.

    Make a deal so they pay you "X" amount if they get a 20% increase in profits or whatever. Set performance goals. Then do it and get paid.

    Not every business owner will take you up on this. But you can find good ones and is a good way to get paid well, especially if you don't have a large track record to convince people to hire you.

    Yet you can still make 5 figures per deal.

    Good luck!
    Signature
    "SUPER AFFILIATE EXPOSES Highly Profitable Traffic Source!"

    "Use This Trick To Make An Extra $50 - $500 Per DAY!"
    Click Here To Check It Out Before The Price Jumps Up AGAIN!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5456729].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author sethczerepak
    Originally Posted by abugah View Post

    Perhaps this has been discussed before in this forum, I will appreciate the link.

    However, what would you tell a new copy cub with decent writing skills that needs $3,000 desperately in the next 30 days?

    He is ready to work 18 hours a day; can raise $100 maximum if it is needed at short notice. And his circumstances are such that he cannot take up a full-time copywriting position.

    I would appreciate your advice. Practical tips, tricks, tactics that he can use.
    My bordering on spammy, but best and honest answer is to buy my copywriting WSO.

    If they're looking for free advice, I'd say take a group of 100 qualified leads, and hit them from all angles: phone, email and direct mail, if you do those right, you should land at least a few thousand.

    Finally, no matter how desperate you are, get yourself into a non-desperate mindset because the easiest deals to close are always those you "need" the least.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5468157].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author rgrimes
    Thanks for the great information provided here,

    I would like to just add - the emphasis of focus on the client, be a really good listener. There is always someone out there who has a problem, find what there problem is, if you have a solution, perhaps think about helping them out and in return you may find help yourself.

    Thanks
    Richard
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5472850].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
      I'm bringing this back to life because of all the PM's I've had
      thanking me for the idea of resurrecting lost clients.

      I have in front of me a campaign result for a chiropractor.

      OBJECTIVE: Bring back patients who haven't been in for over 12 months.

      MAILING: 600

      INVESTMENT: $2.70 per letter sent out total $1620

      RETURN ON INVESTMENT: An additional $67,500 over 3 months 41 to 1 return!

      Now you can see why it's the best return on dollar spent on advertising
      sending out resurrection mailings.

      Best,
      Ewen
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5513427].message }}
      • It proves the point perfectly.

        It can cost a packet to get new customers.

        But a fraction of the amount to bring back previous ones.

        Steve
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5513671].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
          Originally Posted by Steve Copywriter View Post

          It proves the point perfectly.

          It can cost a packet to get new customers

          But a fraction of the amount to bring back previous ones.

          Steve
          Yep.

          And the money is waiting there for both the you and your client.

          Nobody has yet come up with an easier, faster and higher return on money invested.


          Here's the email you send out to chiropractors, dentists, optomoterists...

          HEADER dentist wanted
          CC {10 OTHER DENTIST EMAIL ADDRESSES}

          BODY: HI,

          We have a proven mailer that brings in patients.

          One Clinic got a 41 to 1 return on investment within 3 months.

          If this is something you may be interested in, then reply to this email
          and I'll send you an example of the letter that got the 41 to return on investment.

          Best,
          Joe Jobs
          CEO
          Dental Money Mailers
          dentalmoneymailers.com

          -------------------------------------------------------------------------------

          You make your money from the "design fee".

          If you are in the U.S.A. you also can make money from every piece mailed.

          Postcard Mania will do everything for you for around .50 cents.

          You charge a lot less than the letter mailer and everybody wins.

          We've heard of the copywriters getting paid big bucks for every promo being mailed,
          well this is how you set it up for yourself.

          After you get your client past patients coming back, then you can do mailings for new patients.

          You don't have to limit to health pro's either.

          Once you have documented mailing results in different business types, you send out emails to others in that sector.

          Set them all up with PROVEN MAILERS!

          Best,
          Ewen
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5513842].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Charley Brown
    There is a tremendous wealth of information in this thread that I most certainly will utilize. Thanks to all that have contributed so far. I know I'm not the OP, but there is a lot to be learned.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5513892].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
      Originally Posted by Charley Brown View Post

      There is a tremendous wealth of information in this thread that I most certainly will utilize. Thanks to all that have contributed so far. I know I'm not the OP, but there is a lot to be learned.
      It's all here for the picking Charley!

      Best,
      Ewen
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5513909].message }}

Trending Topics