WSO Sales Letters With Like 30+ Testimonials...

26 replies
Okay, so anyone who has studied buying psychology knows the value of testimonials: they create social proof, and show that people are getting value out of the product.

I like to include at least 5 or 6 testimonials in every sales letter I write, but there's something I've seen on the forum a lot that makes me kind of scratch my head.

What I'm talking about is these WSO sales letters that include literally DOZENS of testimonials.

I just read one that included like 50 of them.

I understand the idea behind this. You're basically saying, "look, ALL THESE PEOPLE love my stuff, that many Warriors can't be wrong."

And yet, at the end of the day, I just don't agree with the strategy.

When I read a sales letter that has 5-10 testimonials, I might actually READ those testimonials.

When I read a sales letter that just offers an endless stream of dozens and dozens of testimonials, they all just start looking the same, and my tendency is to click away to something more interesting.

I have bought a decent number of products off the forum since I've been here, but I'm pretty sure I never bought anything off one of these billion testimonial sales letter WSO pages.

Am I missing something here?
#letters #sales #testimonials #wso
  • Profile picture of the author Neil AM
    I don't think anyone reads all the testimonials, but the fact they can scroll down the page for an age and can SEE that there are tons of testimonials there acts as the social proof. You could probably put two genuine testimonials at top and bottom and fill the rest with Billy Bunter stories and get away with it.

    I don't think it'd work for many other marketplaces, but the forum is built on community so social proof from other warriors is gold.
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  • Profile picture of the author The Marketeer
    You've got a point there. Some people overdo it with the testimonials. There needs to be some kind of balance with the copy and testimonials.

    Just because someone has 50 of them doesn't mean they have to use all of them. They can just display the best ones that make people think,"Wow, I've got to get this" or the ones from recognised names or those that talk about people having acheived good results with the product.
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  • Profile picture of the author mosthost
    Too much social proof looks desperate.
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  • Profile picture of the author travlinguy
    WSOs are a special animal sold to a very warm market here. You'd think that you didn't need as many testimonials in that venue but just the opposite is the case. I think it's really hard to overdo it with any proof. The thing that makes WSO testimonials different from endorsements on the outside is people here often recognize the person giving the testimonial, which gives it added credibility.
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    • Yeah, fair enough. If you see a poster you respect in the testimonial list, you will be more likely to buy. So as many testimonials from well known posters as possible would be good (excuse the tongue twister).
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  • Profile picture of the author carl preza
    I think one or two testimonial from an authority figure is enough.
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  • Profile picture of the author JawadAshraf
    I was not sure that how many testimonials are ok for a WSO. I put my heart in my SEO WSO to provide highest quality info possible and was giving away too many copies for more & more testimonials just for hoping to get WSO of the day. But after that I realized that Mike Lantz choose the WSO of the Day that's being sold TOO FAST not the quality of the WSO. Heck shame on that...
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  • Profile picture of the author Davidtaylor
    I don't bother reading all the testimonials.
    For me they're just waste of time.
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  • Profile picture of the author Elluminati
    I think it is also likely that someone who has 200 or so friends on the forum can easily receive a gang of biased testimonials. So when some of those friends launch WSOs it is likely that the favor will be returned.

    Just a speculation...
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  • Profile picture of the author Viramara
    I always think 50+ testimonials in 1 sales page thread are like a bunch of back-scratch gang, LOL. And mostly if most of the testimonials are too glowing yet shallow, I'll just turn on my skeptic alarm.
    "wow man, you rock....",
    "this one looks good" (really? but is it doable?)
    "looks like it's gonna work" (looks like?)

    Usually instead of seeing sales page's lengthy (or shorty) testimonials, I'd scroll down the page and see what the actual buyers commented.
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  • Profile picture of the author Elluminati
    I've seen where some people will tell reviewers to PM/email the reviews, which really looks suspect. For what? Just in case you write an honestly negative review they can convince/bribe you to rewrite it?
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    • Profile picture of the author Colin Theriot
      Originally Posted by Andy Button View Post

      Okay, so anyone who has studied buying psychology knows the value of testimonials: they create social proof, and show that people are getting value out of the product.
      They also serve as an emotional proxy and can be used to validate the emotions you're evoking in the audience. For example, if I start making you excited about a product I'm about to introduce, I want to show you testimonials with people saying things like "I am so happy to get my hands on this" and "I buy everything Andy sells because he is just the awesomest."

      You can also use emotional testimonials to pre-set emotion before they read the material details of the offer. For example, if I show you a testimonial that says "I am unbelievably excited about this" at the very beginning, there's no doubt it changes the way you will read what comes after.

      Originally Posted by Andy Button View Post

      I like to include at least 5 or 6 testimonials in every sales letter I write, but there's something I've seen on the forum a lot that makes me kind of scratch my head.
      I try to get double that. But I divide up the ones I have into two different kinds - emotional ones as above, and then the results-based ones separately. The first kind go in the early part of the letter, the second kind go in the latter part.

      Originally Posted by Andy Button View Post

      I understand the idea behind this. You're basically saying, "look, ALL THESE PEOPLE love my stuff, that many Warriors can't be wrong."
      Sometimes the number of them can be as persuasive as the individual messages.

      Originally Posted by Andy Button View Post

      And yet, at the end of the day, I just don't agree with the strategy.
      Just because you don't understand how or why it works doesn't mean you should disagree with it.

      Originally Posted by Andy Button View Post

      When I read a sales letter that has 5-10 testimonials, I might actually READ those testimonials.

      When I read a sales letter that just offers an endless stream of dozens and dozens of testimonials, they all just start looking the same, and my tendency is to click away to something more interesting.
      If there is a long line for something, you will probably be curious what that thing is. Will you ask every person in the line why they are waiting, or just the person at the end? In some cases, reading the one or two and seeing there are 50 more is a more persuasive argument than only having enough to reasonably read.

      Originally Posted by Andy Button View Post

      I have bought a decent number of products off the forum since I've been here, but I'm pretty sure I never bought anything off one of these billion testimonial sales letter WSO pages.

      Am I missing something here?
      In addition to missing what I already said, you're also missing that you're falling victim to one of the classic copywriting traps. Your own buying behavior has absolutely ZERO consideration when it comes to crafting persuasive offers. The very fact that you know the strings of persuasion exist are enough to not rely on your own response to advertising. You have a compromised brain, just like the guy who knows how the special effects are done and can no longer suspend disbelief because they know the wires are there.

      Originally Posted by Neil AM View Post

      I don't think anyone reads all the testimonials, but the fact they can scroll down the page for an age and can SEE that there are tons of testimonials there acts as the social proof.
      Yes, quantity is a factor as well as the individual messages.

      Originally Posted by The Marketeer View Post

      You've got a point there. Some people overdo it with the testimonials. There needs to be some kind of balance with the copy and testimonials.
      Balance is not a requirement of sales copy. Conversion is the only requirement.

      Originally Posted by Andy Button View Post

      Just because someone has 50 of them doesn't mean they have to use all of them.
      Maybe not, but you should definitely let people know that there ARE 50 if you don't.

      Originally Posted by Andy Button View Post

      They can just display the best ones that make people think,"Wow, I've got to get this" or the ones from recognised names or those that talk about people having acheived good results with the product.
      Another copywriter's trap. Thinking there's such a thing as the "best" testimonial - you never know what's going to ring someone's bell. Remember, we're looking to give the prospect a proxy - something where they can look at it and see themselves in it, and therefore effectively project themselves into ownership. To that end, the more different testimonials you have from more different kinds of people, the more likely you are to "hit" every kind of person reading.

      Originally Posted by mosthost View Post

      Too much social proof looks desperate.
      Realize that most people don't even know what "social proof" is. As far as proof goes, it's one of the kinds that people have the LEAST skepticism about in normal scenarios. 3rd party verification is indoctrination - people tend to accept it without skepticism, unlike 1st party claims. I can say "I'm awesome" and you might not believe it. If a stranger says "No, seriously, Colin's awesome" and you're more inclined. If someone you know and like already says it, you're even MORE inclined. And if TONS of people are chanting it in unison, that's the most persuasive context there is.

      Originally Posted by carl preza View Post

      I think one or two testimonial from an authority figure is enough.
      You can never have enough persuasion in your sales copy. As long as they are still reading, you can still be selling. Guess how long you can keep them reading if you're a good writer?

      Originally Posted by JawadAshraf View Post

      I was not sure that how many testimonials are ok for a WSO. I put my heart in my SEO WSO to provide highest quality info possible and was giving away too many copies for more & more testimonials just for hoping to get WSO of the day. But after that I realized that Mike Lantz choose the WSO of the Day that's being sold TOO FAST not the quality of the WSO. Heck shame on that...
      Don't give away copies for testimonials. Do an early-bird sale to your loyal list and let them buy it before anyone else in exchange for answering a survey. In the survey, ask leading questions designed to elicit the kind of testimonials you want to have. Then, use testimonials from ACTUAL CUSTOMERS on the letter for your public launch. These are way more effective than ones who are selling testimony for free goodies.

      Originally Posted by Davidtaylor View Post

      I don't bother reading all the testimonials.
      For me they're just waste of time.
      For you as a customer, maybe. But the ones you don't read don't keep you from buying, but they may very well be the thing that convinces the guy after you to buy.

      Originally Posted by Elluminati View Post

      I think it is also likely that someone who has 200 or so friends on the forum can easily receive a gang of biased testimonials. So when some of those friends launch WSOs it is likely that the favor will be returned.

      Just a speculation...
      A WSO is one kind of product sold in one kind of place. But again, the status quo of ANY environment creates an opportunity for differentiation. Differentiation gets attention, and you can use that attention to sell. So for example, using the technique I mentioned above, you can elicit REAL testimonials from PAYING customers. So if you have those, you can say in your letter that they are. Which make YOUR testimonials more likely to be read, and more likely to have their influential effect.
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      • Profile picture of the author The Marketeer
        Originally Posted by Colin Theriot View Post


        Yes, quantity is a factor as well as the individual messages.

        Balance is not a requirement of sales copy. Conversion is the only requirement.

        Maybe not, but you should definitely let people know that there ARE 50 if you don't.

        You can never have enough persuasion in your sales copy. As long as they are still reading, you can still be selling. Guess how long you can keep them reading if you're a good writer?

        Don't give away copies for testimonials. Do an early-bird sale to your loyal list and let them buy it before anyone else in exchange for answering a survey. In the survey, ask leading questions designed to elicit the kind of testimonials you want to have. Then, use testimonials from ACTUAL CUSTOMERS on the letter for your public launch. These are way more effective than ones who are selling testimony for free goodies.
        Don't you think too many testimonials disrupts the flow and effectiveness of the copy and isn't there a danger of overselling when you use too many of them?

        And if you use leading questions, wouldn't that testimonial be slightly enginereed or biased?
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        • Profile picture of the author Colin Theriot
          Originally Posted by The Marketeer View Post

          Don't you think too many testimonials disrupts the flow and effectiveness of the copy and isn't there a danger of overselling when you use too many of them?
          No and no.

          Originally Posted by The Marketeer View Post

          And if you use leading questions, wouldn't that testimonial be slightly enginereed or biased?
          Yes. That is the point. They can still answer however they like, or not at all. I simply ask in a way so that the answer sounds like a testimonial and not a survey answer.

          Ie, what if anything, made you hesitate to buy this? What about this product exceeded your expectations? What was the best part of this product, and how would you rate it on a scale of 1 to 10?

          I don't consider this unethical at all - no more so than only choosing to put positive testimonials in your letter instead of including all complaints and criticisms.
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        • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
          Originally Posted by The Marketeer View Post

          Don't you think too many testimonials disrupts the flow and effectiveness of the copy and isn't there a danger of overselling when you use too many of them?

          And if you use leading questions, wouldn't that testimonial be slightly enginereed or biased?
          I just did a sales letter that prominently focused on utilizing customer reviews and testimonials.

          The sheer number of people who loved this particular service was an immediate indication that I needed to creatively utilize them... as much as possible.

          We did a VSL that shows them pile into the screen (although the exact format for doing this is still being debated)...

          ...but this creates the feeling of critical mass that's important, especially when something sounds too good to be true.

          I also used testimonials/reviews as headlines throughout the sales letter.

          They served as precursors to introduce the following body of copy, just like if I made up a headline.

          Social proof can infinitely increase the flow, readability and conversions of a sales letter or website - IF it's done in a way that maximizes the impact of your copy.

          Ultimately...

          There's no such thing as too many testimonials.

          But the proper usage and placement of them can make a HUGE difference in conversions.

          Mark Pescetti

          P.S. I was approached by a company in San Jose that charges upwards of $10,000 per membership. I WAS going to work for them (and started doing so) because they had a ton of testimonials to support the huge cost for their services. I also wanted to send out an email to a select group of members who are experiencing massive success with the program to further demonstrate the value of this one-off, lifetime investment.

          There were even a few members who were willing to provide video testimonials.

          Keep in mind...

          The website copy did little to communicate the value of this $10,000 investment. (I didn't write it.)

          So testimonials were crucial to help new prospects understand how imperative becoming a member was to trading options. (It's an Options Trading Education company.)

          Long story short...

          The owner of the company dropped the ball and wasn't willing to get more testimonials because there was also a significant amount of members who weren't successfully utilizing the program.

          Sure...

          There were other perspectives we could have pursued, but I opted out because the owner was too thick-headed to help his own company succeed.

          My point?

          There are some companies that require testimonials to have any chance to convert.

          And the more, the better.

          That being said...

          I don't read WSO's and have no interest at press time to appease that market.
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          • Profile picture of the author The Marketeer
            Originally Posted by Mark Pescetti View Post


            ...but this creates the feeling of critical mass that's important, especially when something sounds too good to be true.

            I also used testimonials/reviews as headlines throughout the sales letter.

            Social proof can infinitely increase the flow, readability and conversions of a sales letter or website - IF it's done in a way that maximizes the impact of your copy.

            Ultimately...

            There's no such thing as too many testimonials.

            But the proper usage and placement of them can make a HUGE difference in conversions.

            Mark Pescetti

            P.S. I was approached by a company in San Jose that charges upwards of $10,000 per membership. I WAS going to work for them (and started doing so) because they had a ton of testimonials to support the huge cost for their services. I also wanted to send out an email to a select group of members who are experiencing massive success with the program to further demonstrate the value of this one-off, lifetime investment.

            There were even a few members who were willing to provide video testimonials.

            Keep in mind...

            The website copy did little to communicate the value of this $10,000 investment. (I didn't write it.)

            So testimonials were crucial to help new prospects understand how imperative becoming a member was to trading options. (It's an Options Trading Education company.)

            Long story short...

            The owner of the company dropped the ball and wasn't willing to get more testimonials because there was also a significant amount of members who weren't successfully utilizing the program.

            Sure...

            There were other perspectives we could have pursued, but I opted out because the owner was too thick-headed to help his own company succeed.

            My point?

            There are some companies that require testimonials to have any chance to convert.

            And the more, the better.

            That being said...

            I don't read WSO's and have no interest at press time to appease that market.
            Your idea for sending out an email would have most likely helped to increase the retention rate of existing members. Shame the owner didn't pursue it.

            I'm all for testimonials but I prefer to see them from customers who have got results with the product. That adds value.

            A lot of the replies on this thread are from buyers who seem to dislike too many testimonials or the ones that don't add value.
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  • Profile picture of the author deelouise864
    I find that testimonials are good to a certain point. But testimonials don't sway me on or off forum. I read the message the seller is trying to get across to me. If I trust it and if I need the product I buy it. Sometimes I don't bother with testimonials at all, they are to easy to fake.
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  • Profile picture of the author BHeard
    I agree totally, The testimonial is a bit like the must have OTO irritation..
    If the product is decent and can stand on its own two feet. Especially in the Warrior Forum - we are all in the same arena.
    The products merit is what counts.

    I have definitely skipped some of the newer WSO that have streams of testimonials in the sales page..... Just fills up virtual real estate.

    Occassionaly read some of them in sales letters of a newly launched product (so one might ask how there is already 50 testimonials) and they relate to other products. Relevance???

    Just like OTOs = dont have a problem with upsell but the "urgent need for the next product in the line just reeks of rubbish"... If the original offer/product has merit - let me deal with it then if I think its worth it, I will invest further in what you have to offer.........as long as you put up with it, they will continue to flaunt it.

    A new tact for some warriors is to do the whole outsourcing thing - which alters the language and feel of the intended sale.. The language barrier is apparent.

    This practise I personally see as deceptive and think should not be allowed on the WF...

    An OP releases a WSO then lets outsourcers handle it.
    You can usually pick them, they have the most infuriated Q& A going on...
    And usually a sign of the support this product will have... STAY AWAY.. is what I do..
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  • Profile picture of the author Jerlaw
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    • Profile picture of the author Raydal
      Originally Posted by Andy Button View Post

      I have bought a decent number of products off the forum since I've been here, but I'm pretty sure I never bought anything off one of these billion testimonial sales letter WSO pages.

      Am I missing something here?
      Perception is what is being sold and not the actual reading of
      all the testimonial. A couple testimonials from authority figures
      may work just as well but the "bulk effect" is what is sold with
      the 50 testimonials and not the testimonial content/message.

      The same reason why legalese is often written in fine print--they
      don't want you or expect you to read it. But it makes the offer
      look legal and official.

      -Ray Edwards
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      • Profile picture of the author Colin Theriot
        Originally Posted by BHeard View Post

        I agree totally, The testimonial is a bit like the must have OTO irritation..
        So is this a thread to complain about what you personally don't like about WSO offers, or is it a thread about why and how testimonials work and how you can use them more effectively?

        Originally Posted by BHeard View Post

        If the product is decent and can stand on its own two feet. Especially in the Warrior Forum - we are all in the same arena.
        The products merit is what counts.
        If the product's merit is all that was needed to sell it, "marketing" wouldn't exist at all.

        Originally Posted by BHeard View Post

        I have definitely skipped some of the newer WSO that have streams of testimonials in the sales page..... Just fills up virtual real estate.
        Virtual real estate, by definition, CAN'T be filled - this is precisely why web copy is so great. You don't have to try and cram 50 pages of sizzling salesmanship into 10 pages so it will fit in an envelope.

        Originally Posted by BHeard View Post

        Occassionaly read some of them in sales letters of a newly launched product (so one might ask how there is already 50 testimonials) and they relate to other products. Relevance???
        Here, we come to something I agree with - relevance is important in selecting which testimonials you put in which position. But as for how a product already has testimonials, not every product that is sold as a WSO was created and launched as a WSO. I wish fewer of them were. However, even if it is, you can get testimonials from happy, paying customers before the public launch by doing an earlybird sale to your own list. I would recommend this over ever giving away free review copies.

        Originally Posted by BHeard View Post

        Just like OTOs = dont have a problem with upsell but the "urgent need for the next product in the line just reeks of rubbish"... If the original offer/product has merit - let me deal with it then if I think its worth it, I will invest further in what you have to offer.........as long as you put up with it, they will continue to flaunt it.
        I'm sure you will understand why ham-stringing an offer and tailoring it for you, a person who apparently hates being sold to, would be a bad idea? Neither testimonials nor OTOs and upsells are "flaunting" anything. If the copy and the offer is bad, then it's bad. That's got nothing to do with whether or how many testimonials or upsells it has.

        I never have gotten the whole "I hate marketing even though I want to be a marketer and learn to market my own products" attitude that's rampant in this forum.

        Originally Posted by BHeard View Post

        A new tact for some warriors is to do the whole outsourcing thing - which alters the language and feel of the intended sale.. The language barrier is apparent.

        This practise I personally see as deceptive and think should not be allowed on the WF...

        An OP releases a WSO then lets outsourcers handle it.
        You can usually pick them, they have the most infuriated Q& A going on...
        And usually a sign of the support this product will have... STAY AWAY.. is what I do..
        See, this is what I mean. "Another thing I hate about marketing is this! And this! And this other thing!" Are you wearing your consumer hat, or your marketer hat?

        The reason practices persist is because they work. So are you mad that they are working even though you personally don't like them? You're not the boss of how or why people buy.

        If it doesn't work on you, fine. But if it works for selling to other people, figure out why, and figure out a way to do it that you're happy with. Otherwise, what are you even buying products to learn how to market for?

        But I've contributed about enough to this whine-fest of a thread. I even shared the best way I know to generate ethical and glowing testimonials for a launch before you go public.

        And yet, the negativity persists and people whine about what they hate and want banned from the WSO forum. Eventually, you will be able to have a WSO, but you won't be able to post it or talk about it or link to it, because that "reeks of rubbish" and "oversells" and "deceptive".

        Self-hating marketers. I'll never understand.
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  • Profile picture of the author Stephen Root
    I have learned from experience that you should rather use one or two testimonials per use case or experience instead of just listing 10 times "I love it!". We have our systems set up in a way that we receive quite few testimonials but we usually don't use a lot of them because they sound fake and they don't bring any real value to the letter. I know there's people who disagree with this but we have found that it helps conversion a lot when you go quality instead of quantity, even with testimonials.
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    • Profile picture of the author Colin Theriot
      Originally Posted by Stephen Root View Post

      I have learned from experience that you should rather use one or two testimonials per use case or experience instead of just listing 10 times "I love it!". We have our systems set up in a way that we receive quite few testimonials but we usually don't use a lot of them because they sound fake and they don't bring any real value to the letter. I know there's people who disagree with this but we have found that it helps conversion a lot when you go quality instead of quantity, even with testimonials.
      If the testimonials you get sound fake, it's not the fault of the testimonial giver, but the fault of the process by which you gather them. Fix that, and you'll start getting a lot more testimonials you can use, then it will be a combination of quality AND quantity and you won't have to decide which is better.

      The way you do this is by asking for testimonials with leading questions that give example phrasings of the things you want them to say. This allows the pent up reciprocity they feel to drive them to leave a testimonial, but takes advantage of their laziness in making one up from scratch. If they feel positive, they will adopt the positive language you've provided because it's quicker to "agree".

      I mean, what's the point of having a process that collects a bunch of useless testimonials? You have a mechanism that is wasting your resources and their time if you aren't even going to use it. May as well fix it so it's a win-win.
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      • Profile picture of the author Stephen Root
        Originally Posted by Colin Theriot View Post

        If the testimonials you get sound fake, it's not the fault of the testimonial giver, but the fault of the process by which you gather them. Fix that, and you'll start getting a lot more testimonials you can use, then it will be a combination of quality AND quantity and you won't have to decide which is better.

        The way you do this is by asking for testimonials with leading questions that give example phrasings of the things you want them to say. This allows the pent up reciprocity they feel to drive them to leave a testimonial, but takes advantage of their laziness in making one up from scratch. If they feel positive, they will adopt the positive language you've provided because it's quicker to "agree".
        All good suggestions and I have seen PLF too but the problem is that sometimes you just can't implement such an organized testimonial collection system. For example we have some products that generate social buzz which usually contains testimonials. At this point the problem is hard to fix because the customer is no longer in a confined funnel. Don't get me wrong, I love the fact that people like the products and it's really cool that they spend their time to write us feedback, much appreciated. It's just that we get a lot of testimonials that lack context. That makes them look like we hired a bunch of people to come up with testimonials.

        I mean, what's the point of having a process that collects a bunch of useless testimonials? You have a mechanism that is wasting your resources and their time if you aren't even going to use it. May as well fix it so it's a win-win.
        See the thing is that we are not collecting, we just get them via various channels we engage in However we do have products where it is possible to implement more organized way to get the testimonials and then you get to choose how it's written.
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  • Profile picture of the author shawnlebrun
    i think the reasoning behind 50+ testimonials is just to create such overwhelming proof that you can deliver, you're sorting hoping that all those testimonials will have a "more is better" effect.

    and it does, to a point. i actually have some test results i did on testimonials.

    i used to own a weight loss/fitness website.

    any time i got a great testimonial or a before/after transformation pic, i'd put
    it up on my site.

    and my conversion rate went up.

    however, i noticed that once i added more than 20 or so,
    the conversion rate actually went down!

    now, this was 2 or 3 years ago... so i thought that
    because many of them were before/after pics... that
    the pics slowed down bandwidth, which slowed down
    page loads.

    but that wasn't the case, because i noticed that even
    when i started adding more and more written testimonials,
    my conversion rate started going down.

    so, what i did was have 2 different johnson boxes
    in my sales letter, each containing about 8 testimonials
    or so, and then at the bottom of the johnson box, a link
    that someone could click to open up a new window that
    led them to a page with all my testimonials.

    so, there were only about 15 or so on the salespage,
    but the person could click a link that opened up a new
    window/page... and there i had all 200 or so testimonials.
    and order buttons all throughout.

    this brought my conversion rate back up.

    so, i did find that adding testimonials did
    raise conversions for me.. but only to a point.

    then, once i got over 20 on a page, it
    went down.

    this was my market/niche, so it's not the same
    as everyone else, but those are my result.
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    • Profile picture of the author The Marketeer
      Originally Posted by shawnlebrun View Post

      i think the reasoning behind 50+ testimonials is just to create such overwhelming proof that you can deliver, you're sorting hoping that all those testimonials will have a "more is better" effect.

      and it does, to a point. i actually have some test results i did on testimonials.

      i used to own a weight loss/fitness website.

      any time i got a great testimonial or a before/after transformation pic, i'd put
      it up on my site.

      and my conversion rate went up.

      however, i noticed that once i added more than 20 or so,
      the conversion rate actually went down!

      now, this was 2 or 3 years ago... so i thought that
      because many of them were before/after pics... that
      the pics slowed down bandwidth, which slowed down
      page loads.

      but that wasn't the case, because i noticed that even
      when i started adding more and more written testimonials,
      my conversion rate started going down.

      so, what i did was have 2 different johnson boxes
      in my sales letter, each containing about 8 testimonials
      or so, and then at the bottom of the johnson box, a link
      that someone could click to open up a new window that
      led them to a page with all my testimonials.

      so, there were only about 15 or so on the salespage,
      but the person could click a link that opened up a new
      window/page... and there i had all 200 or so testimonials.
      and order buttons all throughout.

      this brought my conversion rate back up.

      so, i did find that adding testimonials did
      raise conversions for me.. but only to a point.

      then, once i got over 20 on a page, it
      went down.

      this was my market/niche, so it's not the same
      as everyone else, but those are my result.
      Thanks for posting up your results. It's good to hear from people who've tested both ways. I like the idea of putting the strongest testimonials on the main sales page and offering a link where you people can read all the other testimonials on a seperate page.
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      • Profile picture of the author escribe
        I think it really depends on the individual testimonial. If they're all fluff and no proof saying things like "I'm sure after purchasing this my sales will go up" then I don't think it's enough proof for the buyer and may not convert. But if you have testimonials that offer proof of the results the product has made time and time again, then I think 30+ testimonials can really help conversion rates.
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