How to approach on email marketing?

23 replies
Hi,
I would like to get some tips on how to market an email-list.
Whe na person subscribs to my list, what should the first mail be? Should I directly mail the offer the first time? How often should I write mails? Should I offer a product multiply times?


Regards
#approach #email #marketing
  • Profile picture of the author Raydal
    When I am faced with a new email series the question that I’m
    immediately confronted with is what do I say in the first email,
    then the second, then the third? … You get the idea. You can
    quickly run out of ideas if you don’t have a ‘macro structure’
    in mind.

    My favorite macro structure is based on the idea behind collection
    letter series.

    Collection companies have the enviable job of collecting on accounts
    that are past due. The first letter you receive, if you are in that
    unfortunate position, is a kind letter with a ‘by the way’ reminder
    that you have 30 days to pay your delinquent bill or send in a
    legitimate explanation why you think you don’t owe the bill.

    The following letters then become tougher with the very last
    throwing the kitchen sink at you before they finally give up
    and write off your account—if you live in the US—and report
    your account to a credit reporting bureau.

    As the copywriter for the AR series I see myself as collecting
    on the sale and I follow a similar soft-sell to hard-sell progression
    through the email series.

    The AR series would consist of 7-10 emails and follow this
    general CONTENT pattern:

    Letter 1 – Thank you for sending for the report /more
    information, here’s the link.

    Letter 2 – Hope you got the report; here are some
    reasons why you’ll want my product.

    Letter 3 – Here are some questions people are ASKING
    about my product. (FAQ)

    Letter 4 – Here are what people are SAYING about my
    product. (Testimonials.)

    Letter 5 – Here are some of the strongest BENEFITS
    to getting my product. (Limited Offer)

    Letter 6 – Time is running out on the special BONUS.
    How I beat the competition.

    Letter 7 – What’s keeping you back from ordering?
    Knock down objections.

    Letter 8 – Other people who ordered are already enjoying
    the benefits, don’t lose out.

    Letter 9 – Here’s a LIMITED offer—price reduction, sneak
    preview, secret link etc.

    Letter 10 – Frankly I’m puzzled that you haven’t ordered
    yet. Final hard sell.

    As you can see the letters in this series link into a chain of
    persuasion, each letter forming an important link. The letters
    are not intended to stand on their own and each new email
    assumes that the prospect has read the preceding letter.
    Just this fact alone will determine to a great extent how
    you craft each letter.

    -Ray Edwards
    Signature
    The most powerful and concentrated copywriting training online today bar none! Autoresponder Writing Email SECRETS
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    • Profile picture of the author Mark Andrews
      Banned
      Email marketing is essentially all about building relationships. And if you want to become good at it, you might want to try this approach...

      First though, please consider this fact... that each subscriber on your opt-in list is worth to you on average (depending on your niche) +/- $1 per person per month.

      So, a list of 1000 opt-in subscribers has the potential to bring you in approximately $1,000 per month.

      And if you've got 5,000 people on your list, correspondingly you should be aiming to receive approximately $5,000 per month from your opt-in subscribers. Etc; etc;

      Now the secret is not to try and sell your opt-in list subscribers on / at every opportunity.

      Do this and chances are you'll piss a lot of them off fairly quickly.

      They'll perceive you to be someone who is not interested in building a relationship with them personally. Which is not a good marketing tactic.

      You want to endeavor to do the opposite...

      Say for example you intend to email your list / opt-in subscribers twice a week.

      8 emails per month, one at the beginning of the week and one at the end of the week. 8 emails in total per month.

      Here's what I would advise you do...

      Week 1 - Emails 1 & 2 / Week 2 - Emails 3 & 4 / Week 3 - Emails 5 & 6 / - simply concentrate on sending your list valuable information which ultimately will prove to be highly beneficial to them.

      Don't try and sell them anything at all in these 6 emails - weeks 1-3.

      By all means certainly hint softly at the fact that you have something coming up, gently warm them up so to speak... but the main focus should be on helping your list of opt-in subscribers.

      Delivering to them information / tools only which will ultimately help them and reinforce / justify why they signed up to your list originally in the first place. This is called relationship marketing.

      Accompanied with PIM (promotional incentive marketing) which will be the focus of your last 2 emails each month. Talking of which...

      Week 4 - Emails 7 & 8 - you've now established a lot of trust / credibility in the eye's / mind of your list subscribers with your previous 6 emails sent. You've delivered superb valuable insights for a period of a few weeks.

      Now they'll be thinking to themselves...

      'Hells teeth, if s/he's prepared to give away this much for free for the past few weeks without trying to sell us anything at all, I certainly don't mind these last 2 emails of the month pitching me for whatever it is - for it must be good whatever it is s/he's offering to me.'

      You'll find by building a healthy relationship with your opt-in subscribers first, more of these people will be receptive to your sales pitch on these final 2 emails of the month.

      Remind them in email #7 of the key points covered so far in the current month - why this info is important to them personally.

      Simply condense / paraphrase / sum up all of your previous emails into one single email... this will help to reinforce your credibility, which will in turn generate more trust in you.

      Present the information in simple bite-sized digestible chunks which is very very easy to understand.

      Just concentrate on providing little golden nuggets of info summarized in simple form to enable them to accomplish their goal/s and do end this email (#7) with what to look out for in the final email for this month.

      In other words... get them excited by building suspense about what you're now going to offer them.

      In the final email of the month - Email #8...


      Pitch them your product.

      Give them a strong reason to take your direct call to action. Chances are many of them will heed your advice and take you up on your offer IF you follow this format now you've helped them to justify why they signed up with you to begin with.

      Then in month 2 rinse and repeat the process again.

      I hope this proves to be of some benefit to you and others too.

      Btw... if you need a hand writing these sequenced autoresponder emails, each building on the excitement generated by the last one sent... do feel welcome to get in contact with me via email and I'll see what I can do to help you out.

      Warmest regards,


      Mark Andrews
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    • Profile picture of the author Headstart
      Originally Posted by Raydal View Post

      When I am faced with a new email series the question that I'm
      immediately confronted with is what do I say in the first email,
      then the second, then the third? ... You get the idea. You can
      quickly run out of ideas if you don't have a 'macro structure'
      in mind.

      My favorite macro structure is based on the idea behind collection
      letter series.

      Collection companies have the enviable job of collecting on accounts
      that are past due. The first letter you receive, if you are in that
      unfortunate position, is a kind letter with a 'by the way' reminder
      that you have 30 days to pay your delinquent bill or send in a
      legitimate explanation why you think you don't owe the bill.

      The following letters then become tougher with the very last
      throwing the kitchen sink at you before they finally give up
      and write off your account--if you live in the US--and report
      your account to a credit reporting bureau.

      As the copywriter for the AR series I see myself as collecting
      on the sale and I follow a similar soft-sell to hard-sell progression
      through the email series.

      The AR series would consist of 7-10 emails and follow this
      general CONTENT pattern:

      Letter 1 - Thank you for sending for the report /more
      information, here's the link.

      Letter 2 - Hope you got the report; here are some
      reasons why you'll want my product.

      Letter 3 - Here are some questions people are ASKING
      about my product. (FAQ)

      Letter 4 - Here are what people are SAYING about my
      product. (Testimonials.)

      Letter 5 - Here are some of the strongest BENEFITS
      to getting my product. (Limited Offer)

      Letter 6 - Time is running out on the special BONUS.
      How I beat the competition.

      Letter 7 - What's keeping you back from ordering?
      Knock down objections.

      Letter 8 - Other people who ordered are already enjoying
      the benefits, don't lose out.

      Letter 9 - Here's a LIMITED offer--price reduction, sneak
      preview, secret link etc.

      Letter 10 - Frankly I'm puzzled that you haven't ordered
      yet. Final hard sell.

      As you can see the letters in this series link into a chain of
      persuasion, each letter forming an important link. The letters
      are not intended to stand on their own and each new email
      assumes that the prospect has read the preceding letter.
      Just this fact alone will determine to a great extent how
      you craft each letter.

      -Ray Edwards
      Great advice, Ive been doing email for a while now and take a MUCH different approach but in terms of having a structured sequence in place with your followup thats a must. When it comes to broadcasts its a much different story.
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      • Profile picture of the author SutejoTan
        Originally Posted by kennyall View Post

        Great advice, Ive been doing email for a while now and take a MUCH different approach but in terms of having a structured sequence in place with your followup thats a must. When it comes to broadcasts its a much different story.
        I'm completely agree with you....

        what kind of list that needs follow up

        and what kind of list that needs broadcast


        there're different case.
        Signature
        PM me, If you want to do swap .THx
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        • Profile picture of the author Jeremey
          Kind of related, here's an interview with Ivan Levison about the differences between newsletter and direct mail approach versus email letter writing:

          Ivan Levison Interview

          It's pretty lightweight but he makes a few good points for beginners like myself.
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        • Profile picture of the author Headstart
          Originally Posted by SutejoTan View Post

          I'm completely agree with you....

          what kind of list that needs follow up

          and what kind of list that needs broadcast


          there're different case.
          I mean more in the way you approach the email (topics etc.) with broadcast you can write a much more "organic email", play to the topic of current events etc.

          People say broadcasts have higher open rates but if you're testing the subject lines this shouldn't be the case.
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  • Profile picture of the author deezn
    Raydal is too modest to mention that in his sig is a product that can show you how to structure an email campaign.

    I am currently reading Paul Hancox' Presell Mastery (great stuff). I'm ordering Raydal's program right after (love the little sample you give with the sidebar notes).
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    • Profile picture of the author Paul Bottoms
      Turtle,

      Good question on email. Below is something I posted in this forum about a year ago. Below that are the emailing sequences of several other marketers.
      Hope this helps.

      How many marketing emails from the same source (things you've signed up for) become too many? I read somewhere recently that someone thought one a day from the same marketer was fine. Borders Bookstores (the U.S. chain that recently went bankrupt), sent me four emails in a week before I unsubscribed.

      Here's some examples from January 2010 when I counted the emails from three marketers. In a 17 day period, copywriter Michael Fortin sent me 12 emails.

      Michael Senoff of Hard To Find Seminars.com provides hundreds of hours of free marketing material in the form of audio interviews. In 15 days, I received 12 emails from him.

      The only one of the three marketers I bought something from is Effexis Software where I paid $100 for Achieve Planner, an excellent time management program. In a 25 day period, the company sent me 10 emails. Some were tips on using the software while others tried to "upsell" me to a time management course.





      Email mailing sequences
      Online Home Mortgage Co (to people who started to apply for a loan online but quite before finishing)
      They sent 4 within 15 days
      Day 21 video and 5 question survey
      day 35 offering $500 credit
      day 49, testimonials
      day 56 rates update
      Day 62 humorous updates

      A resort was sending emails to people who bought package,
      order confirmation made immediately
      then 40 days before trip
      third email 5 days before trip
      They found it more effective to cut sequence to 2
      The confirmation and about 10 days before the visit

      SMARTBARGAINS
      Sent "next sale" 7 days after purchase--
      new followup offer every two weeks, total three messages
      "next sales" emails are mailed 8am Friday est
      for those who don't complete an order, they sent email two days later

      Corbis pictures which licenses photos ends email 30-60 days before license expires
      This is sent at end October for leases expiring at the end of November
      Sales rep calls week after email
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    • Profile picture of the author Raydal
      Originally Posted by deeznuts View Post

      Raydal is too modest to mention that in his sig is a product that can show you how to structure an email campaign.

      I am currently reading Paul Hancox' Presell Mastery (great stuff). I'm ordering Raydal's program right after (love the little sample you give with the sidebar notes).
      Not a matter of being modest really, but thanks for the mention
      of my program. It has helped hundreds of people and it's a product
      with practically zero refund rate.

      But most people talk about email marketing from two different
      perspectives--newsletter and an autoresponder series.

      A newsletter gives value upfront and hope for the sale later down
      the road. An autoresponder series as I see it is tied to a sales
      letter and pushes for the sale without apology. You may give
      value upfront in the form of a "FREE Report", but you are
      still doing direct selling.

      For people who sign up to my list (newsletter) I send
      them value in every email with little selling. But for
      people who optin for a landing page connected with
      a sales letter, then they would get the series as I outlined
      above.

      -Ray Edwards
      Signature
      The most powerful and concentrated copywriting training online today bar none! Autoresponder Writing Email SECRETS
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  • Profile picture of the author ThomasOMalley
    Get Raydal's email marketing course. Great return on your small investment.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
    Email marketing is about YOU steering the conversation.

    Map out the emotions and circumstances you want to talk about.

    What is crucial that your prospects know about you, your business, your product, your service, your SOLUTION?

    Tell stories.

    Be casual.

    But make audacious statements and demonstrate you know exactly what your readers are feeling RIGHT NOW!

    Draft out all your emails BEFORE you send the first one out.

    Be organized.

    Be deliberate.

    Mark Pescetti
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    Do You Want To Make 5 and 6-Figures A Month As A Freelance Copywriter? My Copywriting System Has Made Over 600 Million Dollars. Discover More

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  • Profile picture of the author RickDuris
    If you can put up with his righteous, know-it-all, anti-goo-roo attitude, Ben Settle's newsletter dedicated to email marketing hits a nerve.

    Email Players Newsletter

    - Rick Duris

    PS: Of course, Ben isn't any of those things (except the anti-goo-roo tirades,) but it's entertaining as hell.
    Signature
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  • Profile picture of the author DavidG
    Autoresponder Madness (Official Site)

    Pick up this course if you want to know anything about how to market your prospects via email...they literally cover everything from affiliate emails to writing and even great strategies on organizing your list for maximum roi.


    DG
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  • Profile picture of the author Robert H Cwik
    Another elegant way of unobtrusive promotion is the use of PS.
    Many e-mail marketers overlook this possibility.
    A well crafted PS can be as effective as a well writted ad copy.
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  • Profile picture of the author more control
    I have a quick question regarding email marketing.

    I use an in-house designed program to send out mailshots. I have a customer database or around 12000 emails. The system I use has pretty no tracking / analytics information and sends out bulk emails at an exceptionally fast rate.

    The general purpose of the mailshots has been to inform customers on latest product ranges in the field of automation. The overall response rate has been quite low. While I do see a marginal increase in the level of website traffic from the result of a mailshot, the effects / benefits are hard to quantify into tangible results.


    I would like to ask whether there is any freeware mailshot programs available that can be used / edited with to customize reporting of a mailshot, so that I can see what my conversion rate is and to find out whether the senders email address has been blacklisted or not.

    I get the feeling that right now I’m sending out information without having any statistical feedback to see whether its getting to the sender and whether it leads to a web view / click.

    I look forward to hearing from you.
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    • Profile picture of the author BrianMcLeod
      Originally Posted by more control View Post

      I use an in-house designed program to send out mailshots. I have a customer database or around 12000 emails. The system I use has pretty no tracking / analytics information and sends out bulk emails at an exceptionally fast rate.

      <snip>

      I would like to ask whether there is any freeware mailshot programs available that can be used / edited with to customize reporting of a mailshot, so that I can see what my conversion rate is and to find out whether the senders email address has been blacklisted or not.

      I get the feeling that right now I'm sending out information without having any statistical feedback to see whether its getting to the sender and whether it leads to a web view / click
      Here's a surprisingly detailed post from the deliverability propellor-head at a popular ESP about what you're up against if you want to send bulk email:

      Email Delivery For IT Professionals | MailChimp

      Not exactly what you're asking for, but arguably more pertinent.

      Brian
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      • Profile picture of the author MikeMarin
        Study Matt Furey.

        Write his emails out by hands...no joke. His style of email writing works...once I switched to daily emails like him I started to make a lot more moolah.
        Signature
        Do you feel stuck in the TRAP of "internet marketing"? Are you sick of Spinning Your Wheels Trying To Make Money Online? Were you promised easy earnings yet have been struggling for YEARS?

        Truth is you've been left in the dark!

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        • Profile picture of the author copyassassin
          I would like to get some tips on how to market an email-list
          Besides all the amazing advice already written, there is one last missing piece nobody has mentioned.

          In fact, I'm gonna go out on a limb and say this piece of advice will be responsible for more profit than ANY else already mentioned:

          SEGMENT YOUR LIST


          Most warriors SUCK at segmenting their lists; it also happens to be the most important thing you can do.

          Segmenting an email list is based on user activity.

          So example, if a user opens a certain email, they get tagged. If they click a link, they get another tag. If they opt in, they get another tag.

          Over time you can send emails to only those that match certain tags you've selected.

          When you do this your open rates will increase, your clicks will increase, your sales will increase because you can better target your message and offer.

          And the quicker you can do this, the better you'll be for it!

          If you like this post, please hit the "thanks" button. It makes me feel good and only takes 1.34 seconds to click.
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  • Profile picture of the author denysapu
    Valuable lesson!
    Thanks all!
    Hope people not blame on me caused this reply. Not to increase the number of posts at all.
    I followed this thread, and I am new to email marketing.
    Signature

    Don't worry be happy!

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  • Profile picture of the author jaasmit
    If you want to do that professionally then i could do that professionally for you.
    But to make it like this you need to make everything clear about the deal.
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  • Profile picture of the author eugenedm
    The best thing to do is to start with aweber and send emails every week once a week. Try to be fun but deliver really good information and it's better if it's not been taught before. It's very powerful and converts well.
    Signature

    WARNING: A 50 Million Dollar Man Taught Me His Secret... Which Resulted 6,000 Sign-ups on My Email List.

    "It's easier than you think..."

    => Watch this video here...
    Build Your List to 6,000 Subscribers

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  • Profile picture of the author FunkyKing
    Id say if you follow the second answer exactly and also make sure the subscriber list is of good quality then your onto a winner. Make sure you don't send them more than once or twice per week though.
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