What's your copywriting process?

11 replies
I'd like to know your copywriting process so I can pick up a few things.

Here's mine...

Try to get inside my prospect's mind to understand their feelings

Take the product and see how I can match what it does to the prospect's feelings

Do that a lot

Then let it all explode onto the page

Let the copy sit for a few days

Take a look at the pile of dung I wrote and start mass deleting sections, moving around sections, expanding on sections

Let the copy sit for a few days

Do basically the last thing I did

Let the copy sit for a few days

tighten it up up into an almost final draft

Let the copy sit a few days

Read the copy and if I don't feel the need to change anything then it's ready
#copywriting #process
  • Profile picture of the author solarpanel2
    [DELETED]
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    • Profile picture of the author ewenmack
      Lately it's been uncovering the pain points
      and what will strike a raw nerve in the reader.

      Features and benefits have been hitting on
      people endlessly... therefore they tune out.

      So naming the enemy in the headline and carrying on with it in the lead is
      the way to go now.

      The #1 goal is to show the reader you know his/her plight more than anybody else.

      Best,
      Ewen
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      • Profile picture of the author JasonParker
        Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post


        Features and benefits have been hitting on
        people endlessly... therefore they tune out.
        I like to take benefits and think about how they specifically relate to the prospect. That way I can do the sort of John Carlton (ish) 1-2 benefit punch.
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      • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
        Originally Posted by ewenmack View Post

        Lately it's been uncovering the pain points
        and what will strike a raw nerve in the reader.

        Features and benefits have been hitting on
        people endlessly... therefore they tune out.

        So naming the enemy in the headline and carrying on with it in the lead is
        the way to go now.

        The #1 goal is to show the reader you know his/her plight more than anybody else.

        Best,
        Ewen
        There is always another perspective to approach articulating the emotionally-driven benefits of a product or service worth its weight in gold.

        Always.

        However...

        I'd love to to see an example of exactly what you mean Ewen...

        Mark
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  • Hi Jason. Nice mp3 about list building... I enjoyed it, thanks!

    What I do is...first learn/research the best info I can to tell me exactly what the prospect wants to learn about.

    At this point its easy as heck to write about. Then...

    I start with a few shocking statements to get their attention and hit their hot emotional buttons...

    Then..explain my position as to what I mean by these statements....

    Then...give them a few FREE examples of this information (VALUE)...

    Then conclude with what they need to fill in the blanks = buy product x

    The most important thing Ive learned to do besides simply persuade is to..

    1. Educate. They need to know why they need my product before they can desire it.

    2. Value. Giving a few freebies (just enough to let them know I know my stuff and am capable of giving value but making them full aware that this is just a TASTE or an EXAMPLE)..

    By adding the free info in the sales copy I build a lot of trust and credibility.

    Thats pretty much my process in a nutshell.

    As far as the headlines...

    I have a totally different thought process for writing my headlines.

    Im constantly asking myself what is this person feeling and thinking RIGHT NOW. Then go from there.

    What are they SICK of, what do they hate, what do they desire. What words can I use to tap into this and make them STOP and say WT_?

    I envision I am the customer and I ask.. what are my fears? Dreams? Desires? Then.. I start asking myself questions.. and I randomly write headlines down as I ask.

    Its actually a lot more to it but that's it in a nutshell.
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  • Profile picture of the author CurtisSWN
    Creative chaos; I immerse myself in the info, and take some time to inhabit the prospects mind. Then I just start throwing text up, stream of consciousness. After I've squeezed that tomato and look at the glorious mess I've created, I start to move text around, in outline form. Next thing you know, I've create something of worth out of a pile text. Then I ruthlessly cut away anything that is detracting from my goal as a copywriter. Then it's just a matter of spellcheck and grammer filter :-)
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    Earns Me Over $146.72 in 12 Hours. This is Weird, But it Works!
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  • Profile picture of the author moreymcmb
    As a copywriter myself, I think that it all depends on the niche on which you are writing.

    First of all, if you like the niche, the process is much more easy! This is because you write from your own knowledge. This is usually the case for people who write for they own websites.

    If you are an outsource, then the process is much more complicated. You first need to do some research on the costumerĀ“s keywords. After the research, start selecting some ideas to use in your article. Combine you writing skills with those ideas and at the end do a quick spellcheck session.
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  • Profile picture of the author travlinguy
    This is the ideal situation where a deadline isn't critical. Interview the client. Examine the target market (looking for what they love, hate and fear). Look at the competition. Make notes. Intuition tells me when I've done enough. Meditate on the desired outcome. Then let it go.

    Within a couple of days I'll just know the approach. Write a massive amount until I don't have any more (no editing during this time). Once I have the primary stuff all down, edit. Ideally, leave it alone for three, four days. Final edit. Publish.

    Not very scientific but works very well for me.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
    My process is similar to Charles above.

    Whether I'm working with a new client, a returning client or writing for myself, I gather all the information I need... then allow it to marinate (so to speak.)

    When I work with clients...

    It's not just about listening to them and understanding their perspective of who they want to benefit...

    ...I want to FEEL their energy, listen to the way they talk, push their buttons, reveal their fears, grasp their relationship with money (and way more...)

    For me...

    It's not just about understanding the target market, what their competition is doing to successfully generate conversions or get into the heads of their prospects.

    No...

    I want to understand WHY they have passion for developing their product or service, HOW they want to impact people's lives and WHAT kind of reality they want to create by launching (or relaunching) their online presence.

    All of this plays such a deep role in the way I write the copy.

    But my process is...

    Once I've done the interviewing, looking at the most successful players in the niche, intimately understanding why my client was inspired to create the product or service, the impact they want to create (in other people's lives) and the emotions/circumstances we're appealing to...

    ...I walk away.

    Sure, I might take down some notes.

    But until I've received inspired thought, virtually written the copy in my mind and visualized a very specific response in the intended readers...

    ...I spend my time enjoying life.

    Because it's only when I feel good that the most harmonious brand positioning reveals itself for me to articulate.

    Once inspiration hits me over the head like a knockout punch from Mike Tyson, the copy POURS out of me like a fine vintage wine from the turn of the 20th Century.

    Now I realize the word "inspiration" is looked down upon by some of the gurus.

    That's fine.

    I couldn't care less.

    In fact...

    I could get WAY more esoteric about WHERE the copy comes from.

    But I'll stop here...

    Mark Pescetti
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  • Profile picture of the author netpulse45
    awesome pointers!
    to add-up some ideas is by searching some surveys related to the topic. from their you can navigate what is the current buzz
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  • Profile picture of the author WinstonTian
    For the more profitable ones...

    1) Research, shadow people, interviews, surveys, calls,
    statistical analysis and probability, neuroscientific mapping,
    idea hierarchies, emotion research, field research, etc...

    2) Gather notes from step 1 into a rough draft, cluster ideas
    and points into messages.

    3) Re-order the messages for "reframing".

    4) Dimensionalization, "hook", swipe inspiration...

    5) Patterning into strategies, then into a structured theme...

    6) Replacements, structural editing. Followed by mini-test.
    (looped until it's completed)

    7) If it doesn't work out, I burn the copy, and restart from
    #1.

    It's a huge time-sucker especially for #1, 3, 4 and 6 though.

    Winston Tian
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    Cheers,
    Winston
    The Beginner's Doctor

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  • Profile picture of the author Rezbi
    1. Research
    2. Research
    3. Research
    4. Research
    5. Research
    6. Write
    7. Edit
    8. Edit
    9. Edit
    10. Shout, "Whoopee!"
    11. Edit some more
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