Sneaky Advertising Secrets That Made Me A Believer!

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So I was doing some research for a project and I came across a site that had "paid content" ads mixed in with other links and headlines. There were little thumbnails for each pic and as you moused over them, locally specific headlines popped up for each ad. For example, I live in Roanoke, VA...And so this genius headline popped up:

"(Virginia): This One Weird 'Loophole' has become the car insurance companies worst nightmare!"

Clicking led me to this ad:

ConsumerFinanceDaily.com

Turns out it's just an ad for one of those price comparison insurance companies...The price comparison gimmick turned out to be the "loophole" that insurance companies hate. I was impressed, I don't normally fall for those kind of teaser headlines but this one got me.

More impressive was that the advert knew I was in Virginia (another one specified "Roanoke Virginia" in the copy). What is this crazy technology and how is it being implemented by copywriters?

And if it's any of you out there that are responsible for that copy, kudos to you friend!
#advertising #believer #made #secrets #sneaky
  • Profile picture of the author Steve Hill
    The insurance "loophole" advertising is big in California too, and is probably a nationwide campaign.

    As for determining location, internet-based targeted ads use geolocation software which typically backtracks from your IP data. Mobile devices use a variety of methods to determine location (fencing, triangulation, GPS data if available, etc.).

    Geomarketing is a fast-growing field, with a lot of new marketing possibilities. For example, someone could search for nearby Chinese restaurants, and be delivered a free appetizer coupon for a nearby location, good for the next hour.
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    • Profile picture of the author Jeremey
      Originally Posted by Steve Hill View Post

      The insurance "loophole" advertising is big in California too, and is probably a nationwide campaign.

      As for determining location, internet-based targeted ads use geolocation software which typically backtracks from your IP data. Mobile devices use a variety of methods to determine location (fencing, triangulation, GPS data if available, etc.).

      Geomarketing is a fast-growing field, with a lot of new marketing possibilities. For example, someone could search for nearby Chinese restaurants, and be delivered a free appetizer coupon for a nearby location, good for the next hour.
      LOL, I'm such a dumbass....The research I was doing was for a local SEO service, and I'm writing about mobile optimization, etc right now!

      I think I was thrown by the fact that I didn't enter any information, like what would be picked up by a PPC ad in a Google search, and I wasn't on a mobile phone...But of course, IP addresses...ha!

      Still, very taken by the headline and content of the copy, really top notch stuff...
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  • Profile picture of the author Steve Hill
    The amount of automatic background tracking that goes on (from Google and many other companies) can be rather surprising. Have you ever noticed that the same or related (similar) ads often show up, no matter where you are on the web? That's tracking in action.

    This link has some interesting information:

    I'm Being Followed: How Google--and 104 Other Companies--Are Tracking Me on the Web - Alexis C. Madrigal - The Atlantic

    Using Google searches and Google e-mail accounts also has some tracking and marketing implications. A document from Google reveals a little bit about how it works:

    Ads on Google search, Gmail, and certain other Google websites - Web Search Help

    I was discussing tracking recently with someone, and found these two links. A quick search for 'Google tracking' will bring up other similar articles. While still relatively new technology, the possibilities are significant for marketers and copywriters.
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    • Profile picture of the author TheSalesBooster
      You guys never heard of this stuff?

      It's everywhere and has been for the past couple of years. Geo IP and those landing pages work very well.. In fact they are too good that the FTC will be all over your ass if you use them.

      It's basically a fake news site. The idea was basically swiped from one of the old timers, I think it was probably Gary. Using the idea of an article that looks like it belongs in the magazine or paper. Except they took it to a whole new level and started plastering fake news logos all over them a couple years back, claiming they were a news station. They call them farticles and I'm guessing they won't be going anywhere anytime soon, but don't even think about using them.
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      • Profile picture of the author Steve Hill
        Originally Posted by TheSalesBooster View Post

        You guys never heard of this stuff?

        It's everywhere and has been for the past couple of years. Geo IP and those landing pages work very well.. In fact they are too good that the FTC will be all over your ass if you use them.

        It's basically a fake news site. The idea was basically swiped from one of the old timers, I think it was probably Gary. Using the idea of an article that looks like it belongs in the magazine or paper. Except they took it to a whole new level and started plastering fake news logos all over them a couple years back, claiming they were a news station. They call them farticles and I'm guessing they won't be going anywhere anytime soon, but don't even think about using them.
        That's complete nonsense. Did you even read it?

        The Atlantic is hardly in the business of putting up fake news sites, and that news logos infographic was part of another article in early 2011.

        Geography based on IP is used on a daily basis, without any FTC intervention. Adwords has tools for geographic performance and geographic targeting, for example. There are some types of invasive consumer tracking techniques that are frowned upon (such as unauthorized GPS tracking), but location based on IP is not one of them.
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        • Profile picture of the author TheSalesBooster
          Originally Posted by Steve Hill View Post

          That's complete nonsense. Did you even read it?

          The Atlantic is hardly in the business of putting up fake news sites, and that news logos infographic was part of another article in early 2011.

          Geography based on IP is used on a daily basis, without any FTC intervention. Adwords has tools for geographic performance and geographic targeting, for example. There are some types of invasive consumer tracking techniques that are frowned upon (such as unauthorized GPS tracking), but location based on IP is not one of them.
          Was referring to OP's post and the landing page he linked. Not your post.

          There's nothing wrong with geo-ip. I was simply talking about OP's link.
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          • Profile picture of the author Steve Hill
            Originally Posted by TheSalesBooster View Post

            Was referring to OP's post and the landing page he linked. Not your post.

            There's nothing wrong with geo-ip. I was simply talking about OP's link.
            The OP's landing page is an example of a fake ad. The entire website looks like it is set up for placing those kinds of ads, with a mix of pseudo-news and fake ads.

            Originally Posted by TheSalesBooster View Post

            Geo IP and those landing pages work very well.. In fact they are too good that the FTC will be all over your ass if you use them.
            But what are you saying here, then? What will the FTC be all over your ass about "if you use them"?
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            • Profile picture of the author TheSalesBooster
              Originally Posted by Steve Hill View Post

              The OP's landing page is an example of a fake ad. The entire website looks like it is set up for placing those kinds of ads, with a mix of pseudo-news and fake ads.
              No. That website itself is the ad. That's the whole point of the website. It tries to pass itself off as a real news site but in reality its one big ad. Look at the top of the website itself it says "ADVERTISEMENT".

              Trust me I know what I'm talking about here. I know everything about these shady sites. that's what I was hinting at when i said...


              Originally Posted by Steve Hill View Post

              But what are you saying here, then? What will the FTC be all over your ass about "if you use them"?
              The FTC will be all over your ass if you use these fake news sites to advertise your products. Get it now?
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    • Profile picture of the author TheRealDMH
      Originally Posted by Steve Hill View Post

      The amount of automatic background tracking that goes on (from Google and many other companies) can be rather surprising. Have you ever noticed that the same or related (similar) ads often show up, no matter where you are on the web? That's tracking in action.
      Absolutely! One way I have found to avoid this is using Do Not Track, free plugin for Firefox, Chrome and IE.

      Here's the link for firefox:
      https://addons.mozilla.org/en-us/fir...onottrackplus/
      About this Add-on

      YOU'RE BEING FOLLOWED
      Every time you're on the web, companies, ad networks, and social networks collect info about you. Everything from what you read, what you click, and what you buy is being monitored and stored. Now with DoNotTrackPlus (DNT+), you can stop them.
      Currently mine says:
      "Your all-time total is:
      120,959 blocked"


      There's obviously more full-on ways to prevent tracking but I find this to be an easy way to stop Google tracking me across the web.

      Especially if I am doing research into something obscure... and then find that I am receiving those ads - EVERYWHERE.

      So if you haven't seen this, recommended and hope it helps
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