Why being "wishy-washy" at the close can KILL the sale

9 replies
You can't be "wishy washy" or "ah shucks, golly gee" when you're going for the close in a sales pitch.

Whether it's in person, on paper, in email, or on a digital page, you've got to be direct with the prospect and TELL them exactly what they should do.

Here's how to get it, and go get it now.

Of course, you've built up to that point by following the proper rules of copy... but don't blow it at the very end.

It amazes me when I do critiques for students, how indirect they can be at the end of their sales letter or in their emails.

And it can kill response.

For example, I'm looking at an email right now I'm critiquing and the email is actually quite good... until you get to the end, it sorta just "leaves you hanging"

If I'm thinking "what should I do" when reading it, I know damn well the prospect will as well.

Being clear, specific, and direct is important when writing the close. Tell the reader what to do, and to do it now.

And there's really only one way you can do that and do it well.

Believing in what you're selling. Believing wholeheartedly that what you're selling can truly help the reader.

To me, it makes it much easier to close the letter.

If what you're selling is something you truly believe will help your prospect, then it's YOUR DUTY to tell them to go get it now.

As long as your directness at the close is focused on helping the prospect get what's in their own best interest, then consider it something you SHOULD feel good about writing.

If you know that what you've got will help them get what's best for them, that it's in their best interest... then heck, be direct.

Remember, people are silently begging to be led.

So be bold in your close.

Tell the prospect: Hey, this is exactly what you need, take action right now because you're right here and this will help you solve your problem.

Here's why you need to take it right now (scarcity or urgency bonus?)

But tell them to take action, and tell them to do it now.

Again, you can DO this when you feel confident about what you're selling.

If you know that what you have can help the prospect, that it's in their own best interests to order, then you have to really give the prospect direction.

There's always a way to write copy so that you're direct and specific, and you're telling the prospect to order right now... and do it in a way in which the prospect can just FEEL you have their own best interests at heart.

They feel like they're being supported and helped get rid of a problem or concern, or they're being led to fulfill their ultimate desire... instead of being pushed to buy something.

By the end of your letter, if you've done your job, the prospect should FEEL like they want to buy and not feel like they've just been sold.

But the job doesn't end there... you've got to be specific and tell the prospect exactly what to do, and do it now, BECAUSE it will help them so much.

Just having the compassion and empathy will make you stand out, because you'll go from being a pushy sales person to more of a trusted advisor making a recommendation.

So don't drop the ball at the end of your pitch.

If you truly believe in what you're selling, you OWE it to yourself and the prospect to help them get it right now.
#close #kill #sale #wishywashy
  • Profile picture of the author Jason_V
    Shawn,

    Could you please give an example of a closing piece of copy which in your opinion does a good job of doing what you describe?

    Thanks,

    Jason
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    "When you do something exactly wrong, you always turn up something."
    -Andy Warhol
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  • Profile picture of the author RickDuris
    Originally Posted by shawnlebrun View Post

    Just having the compassion and empathy will make you stand out, because you'll go from being a pushy sales person to more of a trusted advisor making a recommendation.
    I believe it's ok to have compassion and empathy in the beginning of a piece. But not at the end.

    NEVER at the end.

    "I appreciate the fact you have no money. I've been there too. But don't you owe it to yourself sign up now and finally do the one thing that''l change your life forever?"

    See how weak and mealy-mouthed that comes across?

    By the end of the piece, the prospect should be seeing things YOUR way. He should be nodding his head every time you drive another point of yours home.

    Not the other way around.

    By the end of the piece, you should be finishing AT LEAST 2X stronger than when you started with the headline. Especially with online offers. You should be not just at concert pitch, but at fever pitch.

    Every final point you make should be tapping into his fears, desires or the irrefutable logic of why it's so important to take action now.

    If you and he were in the octagon and you have him where you want him, make him tap out. Submission hold. No other choice. All exits closed.

    Finish the job.

    Sorry, but I don't think you get there by saying "I know how you feel..."

    - Rick Duris
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    • Profile picture of the author Edk
      Shawn, well said. It's the shyness to do with not wanting to put someone on the spot, It may be fear of rejection or some such nonsense. As in asking for a date. All that build-up for nothing! And Heavens! Look what you're in for when they give the nod!!

      Yes it surely doesn't make sense. That post or one like it needs to be on every page of WF, sometimes a couple of times to counter-act timidity. Thanks for the post...
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      • Profile picture of the author shawnlebrun
        Originally Posted by Edk View Post

        Shawn, well said. It's the shyness to do with not wanting to put someone on the spot, It may be fear of rejection or some such nonsense. As in asking for a date. All that build-up for nothing! And Heavens! Look what you're in for when they give the nod!!

        Yes it surely doesn't make sense. That post or one like it needs to be on every page of WF, sometimes a couple of times to counter-act timidity. Thanks for the post...
        Good point... which is why some people can excel at copywriting and not at in-person sales.

        It all has to do with the overwhelming fear of rejection.

        In person, you have to deal with it right then and there.

        But in print, some may say it's easier... but when you think about it, print lends a totally different set of rules.

        Like Rick mentioned... all exits closed.

        Well, in person, you can counter objections right then and there... as they come up.

        in print, not so much. You have to almost have to anticipate their objections and come up with reasons to most of them before hand... so you can close off the exits.

        I've sold in person and I've sold in print... both can be difficult for different reasons.

        But it IS easier for some to deal with the shyness and rejection issue when dealing with the written word... since the sting isn't really "there in person"

        I have a good friend who was horrible at selling in person. We both sold memberships.

        He hated it because he would psyche himself out before hand, worried he'd be rejected.

        He has since gone on to making millions with his written skills... and he's told me it's simply because that fear of being rejected in person isn't there.

        so selling in print or in person has its own unique circumstances.
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  • Profile picture of the author MadHattie123
    Originally Posted by shawnlebrun View Post

    And there's really only one way you can do that and do it well.

    Believing in what you're selling. Believing wholeheartedly that what you're selling can truly help the reader.
    ------
    If you truly believe in what you're selling, you OWE it to yourself and the prospect to help them get it right now.
    Thank you for that reminder.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
    The end of a sales letter or vsl should ideally create a huge sense of consequence for NOT taking action. You have to make prospects experience genuine pain for even considering the option of leaving behind the potentials you've communicated.
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  • Profile picture of the author SeanIM
    To paraphrase JC (haha it's fun to refer to Carlton as that)...

    Don't sell from your heels.


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    Sean Mitchell -
    Online Marketing & Tech Consultant Since 1999
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  • Profile picture of the author Daniel Scott
    To add to your idea...

    If you have a good offer (and if you don't, go work on it until it IS a good offer...)

    Then the close writes itself.

    "You get all this for just $x... PLUS, you get a money-back guarantee... AND, if you don't get the results you're looking for we'll fly a hooker to your house free of charge!"

    Ideally, you want to have a "no brainer" offer. If you've got that, telling people they're a moron for not taking you up on it is pretty easy!

    -Daniel

    P.S. I don't recommend actually calling your potential customers morons. Unless you're Kelly Felix, that approach doesn't go down well most of the time...
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    Always looking for badass direct-response copywriters. PM me if we don't know each other and you're looking for work.

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    • Profile picture of the author copyassassin
      Originally Posted by Daniel Scott View Post


      " AND, if you don't get the results you're looking for we'll fly a hooker to your house free of charge!"
      Daniel,

      I'm gonna have to swipe this line

      Adam
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      The Most Bad-Ass Tax Reduction Strategist for Internet Marketers who HATE paying taxes. See my happy clients

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