If You Have One Minute, . . . I Promise Your Headlines Will Glow.

7 replies
In these times of economic downturn most folks sift through information like sand through a sieve. Headlines that used to serve as solid controls now-a-days fall under suspicion of “Sure, but it’s probably too good to be true” category and get skipped.

Yes, benefit words especially big benefits have traditionally been enough in a headline to pull a reader into the body of sales copy. Too often this old time approach, due to over use and over promise acts like a trigger to launch the reader onto the next thing leaving your copy in the dust.

One of the best ways to disarm the wary reader of his uninterested response is to use the “If, Then” concept in your headline followed by plenty of solid proof to get you through the door of your reader’s spam-filter. EXAMPLES:

“These New Writing Techniques Will Improve Your Copy Headlines” (old approach)

(verses)

“If You Have One Minute, . . .I Promise Your Headlines Will Glow” (new approach)

The first headline uses tired old words like New and Improve to grab the attention of the reader for the promise of personal success in writing headlines. But the second one uses “If, Then” phrasing which encourages the reader to drop his resistance with a comparative guarantee up front and keep reading.

This small change in your headline writing approach will make a huge difference in reader response. Work with it and see how convincing it is even while you are thinking up new phrases to pitch your products. It’s a charm.
#glow #headlines #minute #promise
  • Profile picture of the author marciayudkin
    "If You Have One Minute, . . .I Promise Your Headlines Will Glow"
    Sorry, this doesn't do it for me.

    Why should I care whether or not my headlines will glow? I want them to get results.

    Marcia Yudkin
    Signature
    Check out Marcia Yudkin's No-Hype Marketing Academy for courses on copywriting, publicity, infomarketing, marketing plans, naming, and branding - not to mention the popular "Marketing for Introverts" course.
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  • Profile picture of the author shawnlebrun
    Originally Posted by LastingLifeSuccess View Post

    In these times of economic downturn most folks sift through information like sand through a sieve. Headlines that used to serve as solid controls now-a-days fall under suspicion of "Sure, but it's probably too good to be true" category and get skipped.

    Yes, benefit words especially big benefits have traditionally been enough in a headline to pull a reader into the body of sales copy. Too often this old time approach, due to over use and over promise acts like a trigger to launch the reader onto the next thing leaving your copy in the dust.

    One of the best ways to disarm the wary reader of his uninterested response is to use the "If, Then" concept in your headline followed by plenty of solid proof to get you through the door of your reader's spam-filter. EXAMPLES:

    "These New Writing Techniques Will Improve Your Copy Headlines" (old approach)

    (verses)

    "If You Have One Minute, . . .I Promise Your Headlines Will Glow" (new approach)

    The first headline uses tired old words like New and Improve to grab the attention of the reader for the promise of personal success in writing headlines. But the second one uses "If, Then" phrasing which encourages the reader to drop his resistance with a comparative guarantee up front and keep reading.

    This small change in your headline writing approach will make a huge difference in reader response. Work with it and see how convincing it is even while you are thinking up new phrases to pitch your products. It's a charm.
    Check out "Tested Advertising Methods" by John Caples... I think you'll find the section on writing headlines very useful.
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    • Profile picture of the author Goroddy
      Originally Posted by shawnlebrun View Post

      Check out "Tested Advertising Methods" by John Caples... I think you'll find the section on writing headlines very useful.
      Thanks Shawn... I had never heard of that book. Just bought it on Amazon. Appreciate the info!
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      • Profile picture of the author mrdomains
        Opening with "if" plants the seed of indecision, specially as used here: begging for attention.

        Using the word "promise" has no beneficial value whatsoever. It doesn't even mean anything. A promise is thin air without a guarantee. Promises are what kids blurt when they are lying to their parents.

        Sorry for being blunt but you need to rethink everything from step 1. You are on the wrong track.
        Signature

        Free action plan : Think less. Do more.

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  • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
    Originally Posted by LastingLifeSuccess View Post


    This small change in your headline writing approach will make a huge difference in reader response. Work with it and see how convincing it is even while you are thinking up new phrases to pitch your products. It's a charm.
    Got a significant number of split test results to back up that claim?

    Alex
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