by max5ty
45 replies
Copywriters have an advantage...they know how to write ads that sell a boatload of products.

Was talking with someone about this a few weeks ago.

They were saying they didn't have a product to sell.

I gave them an idea. Last I talked to them, they were doing so good they thought they'd discovered a gold mine.

Actually, they did.

Not every product you sell has to be an ebook. It IS possible to sell actual products, and do very nicely with them.

Christmas is coming up and everyone should have a product.

Anyways...

Here's what I told them.

Go to this site:

Wholesale Central - Directory of wholesalers and wholesale products

Has 1000's of items you can buy wholesale.

I won't disclose the product they came up with, but I'll do another example in real time...

It's winter, so let's find something useful in the winter.

How bout this?

NEW "HEATFLEX" HEATED WINDSHEILD WIPERS W/INSTALL KIT.

They're heated windshield wipers. You can buy them for like $14 something a pair. They sell elsewhere on the net for around $150. You could sell them for way less if you wanted.

Do a website, write a sales letter, postcard, DM piece, or whatever and sell them. They'll even drop ship them to your customer.

The possibilities are limitless.

Who says you have to wait for someone to come to you with their product?

Put your skills to work with your own product.

Now...

Let's add a little bonus to the offer.

Again just by doing a quick search.

Blink Spill Grabbers Super Absorbant Auto Interior Wipes

They're wipes for autos. Would cost us 20 cents each.

Not the biggest bonus offer, but hopefully you get the point.

If you can make money writing copy for someone else's product...you can make big money selling your own thing.

Hopefully this will spark an idea.

You'll probably come up with a better product.

Definitely not a new idea, but maybe one you've forgotten about or never heard of before.

It works.

You have a plan...now put it to work.

Best wishes.
#money
  • Profile picture of the author shawnlebrun
    Nice share max5ty... that was a site I used years ago when selling stuff on ebay.
    It's top notch.

    And you're right... any marketer who says they can't find a product... is not looking.

    Think of problems people have... and find something that solves those problems.

    Think of what can add value to people's lives... and sell that.

    A lot of people fail to sell stuff because they feel that they need to come up with the next Ipod or tablet computer.

    Nope, just build a better mousetrap. something better/different/unique/faster/cheaper

    I always think of Joe Sugarman... sold millions of sunglasses. And had a catalog full of products.

    Nice timing of this post, with Xmas coming...
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    • Profile picture of the author max5ty
      Originally Posted by shawnlebrun View Post


      I always think of Joe Sugarman... sold millions of sunglasses. And had a catalog full of products.

      Nice timing of this post, with Xmas coming...
      This summer I was up in your state of Maine.

      We stopped at the Kennebunk Service Plaza on 95 and I noticed they had a woman with a cart set up selling sunglasses.

      Figured she probably got them from a site like the one I mentioned. Seemed like she was keeping pretty busy.

      You're right though, there's no shortage of products. No reason anyone should ever be in a dry spell.

      When I was writing the OP, I was thinking of all the safety features you could play up when selling heated wipers.

      Selling can be fun if you make it fun.

      Thanks for the feedback.
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  • I often get asked by would be marketeers - what product should I sell?

    My best answer is - sell something you are really passionate about (even in an overcrowded market place, using the right tactics, there is still plenty of room to make a lot of money from it).

    Second best answer is - sell something that really interests you (no matter how obscure it is - they'll be a niche market for it).

    And providing you at least like and believe in the "thing" it make all the problems, trials and tribulations in getting it to the people a lot easier to deal with.


    Steve
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  • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
    You know Max...

    You may have just helped a few struggling copywriters create a happy Christmas by reminding them of the power they have.

    Mark
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    • Profile picture of the author max5ty
      Originally Posted by Steve The Copywriter View Post


      My best answer is - sell something you are really passionate about (even in an overcrowded market place, using the right tactics, there is still plenty of room to make a lot of money from it).

      Steve
      A crowded market usually means it's a hot product. You can still rise to the top.

      Don't know how it is in the U.K., but here in the U.S. I've seen someone build a new gas station/convenience store on one corner while there's already one on the other 3 corners.

      Usually the new store takes over while the other 3 either go out of business or struggle.

      Probably not the best example to use, but it shows you shouldn't be afraid of the competition when you have a better idea.

      Originally Posted by Mark Pescetti View Post

      You know Max...

      You may have just helped a few struggling copywriters create a happy Christmas by reminding them of the power they have.

      Mark
      Amazing what's possible once you really realize it.

      You can give yourself a pay raise anytime you want.
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      • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
        Originally Posted by max5ty View Post

        Amazing what's possible once you really realize it.

        You can give yourself a pay raise anytime you want.
        Yeah, but sometimes you need a reminder about what's possible.

        A lot of copywriters get stuck in the "ambulance chasing" mode - where they're constantly prospecting for clients - when they could be selling something and make MORE money.

        It's threads like this that act like a reminder and get rid of the damn tunnel vision.

        Mark
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  • Profile picture of the author Johnny12345
    Originally Posted by max5ty View Post

    I gave them an idea. Last I talked to them, they were doing so good they thought they'd discovered a gold mine.
    <snip>
    Do a website, write a sales letter, postcard, DM piece, or whatever and sell them. They'll even drop ship them to your customer.

    Max,

    I'm curious...

    Specifically, what type of sales process did your successful friend use? Website and PPC? Website with DM? (Both PPC and DM can be expensive marketing methods -- but with the example pricing your quoted, it's possible.)

    Also, what type of website did they use? A single-page site with just one product, or did they open a full e-commerce site with multiple (or many) related products?

    Nice post.

    John
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    • Profile picture of the author Alex Cohen
      Originally Posted by Johnny12345 View Post

      Max,

      I'm curious...

      Specifically, what type of sales process did your successful friend use? Website and PPC? Website with DM? (Both PPC and DM can be expensive marketing methods -- but with the example pricing your quoted, it's possible.)

      Also, what type of website did they use? A single-page site with just one product, or did they open a full e-commerce site with multiple (or many) related products?

      Nice post.

      John
      Could just be a made up story...

      Alex
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      • Profile picture of the author max5ty
        Originally Posted by Johnny12345 View Post

        Max,

        I'm curious...

        Specifically, what type of sales process did your successful friend use? Website and PPC? Website with DM? (Both PPC and DM can be expensive marketing methods -- but with the example pricing your quoted, it's possible.)

        Also, what type of website did they use? A single-page site with just one product, or did they open a full e-commerce site with multiple (or many) related products?

        Nice post.

        John
        I know she uses a separate website for each product. Believe she's on her fourth now.

        Don't know about the PPC. Like you said, a lot of the products can be obtained for very low cost and sold much higher.

        Know she sent out 3000 postcards. She had them printed for under $100.

        She's got 2 of her products in a local owned store now.

        She primarily deals in niche products that mothers are interested in.

        When I get time I'll ask her about the PPC.

        Thanks for the fedback.

        Sorry I couldn't answer your question better.


        Originally Posted by Alex Cohen View Post

        Could just be a made up story...

        Alex
        Sorry you couldn't see the benefit in the idea. Maybe I didn't explain it well enough.
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        • Profile picture of the author Johnny12345
          Originally Posted by max5ty View Post

          Know she sent out 3000 postcards. She had them printed for under $100.

          Thank You, Max.

          The key thing here would be to do the break-even math required to see if you would be likely to make a profit.

          If she sent out 3,000 postcards -- even at bulk rates -- the postage cost would dwarf the printing. Plus, on top of that, the cost of a list (if she rented one) could be fairly high.

          But, with the high margins you quoted, it could be done (and, obviously, your friend is proof of it).

          Thanks again, for your post. If you learn any additional details, it would certainly be interesting to hear about it.

          John
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  • Profile picture of the author TerryX
    It's great to have a skill you can use on any product. It's a huge advantage.
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  • Profile picture of the author Ron Lafuddy
    Excellent post max5ty.

    There are many ways to approach this idea.

    I just completed a cross promotion with some auto-related businesses.
    If I wanted to, I could include an ad in the promotion piece, for a
    product that none of the other businesses sell.

    I can think of a few things that their customers might go for.

    I may be able to come up with a local source for what I have in mind.

    No mailing or list costs. No upfront cost at all.

    I'm gonna have to give this one some thought. Thanks!
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  • Profile picture of the author Don Grace
    Great post, you know whats funny is I've been selling digital products for my clients and myself for many years... Recently I wrote copy for an ecommerce info product,

    I've done at least 300 sales funnels for the MMO niche and this one was about the closest thing to selling myself silly then all of them. I found myself taking personal notes and realizing in the pitch that it can be a lot easier to sell many items just for the fact there's no convincing involved... they already want what you've got.
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  • Profile picture of the author The Copy Nazi
    Banned
    Straight out of The Dreamers Handbook. It's one thing to know where to buy wholesale (and there are tons of those sites) it's quite another to know how to drive traffic to it.

    I know she uses a separate website for each product. Believe she's on her fourth now.

    Don't know about the PPC. Like you said, a lot of the products can be obtained for very low cost and sold much higher.
    In other words you have no idea. "PPC" means "Pay Per Click". Nothing to do with profit margins or whatever you think it is he's talking about.
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    • Profile picture of the author max5ty
      Originally Posted by The Copy Nazi View Post

      Straight out of The Dreamers Handbook. It's one thing to know where to buy wholesale (and there are tons of those sites) it's quite another to know how to drive traffic to it.

      In other words you have no idea. "PPC" means "Pay Per Click". Nothing to do with profit margins or whatever you think it is he's talking about.
      I know exactly what pay per click is.

      You're obviously just being negative again.
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    • Profile picture of the author jimbo13
      Originally Posted by The Copy Nazi View Post

      In other words you have no idea. "PPC" means "Pay Per Click". Nothing to do with profit margins or whatever you think it is he's talking about.
      He never wrote that it was anything to do with Profit Margins.

      Dan
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    • Profile picture of the author Johnny12345
      Originally Posted by The Copy Nazi View Post

      Straight out of The Dreamers Handbook. It's one thing to know where to buy wholesale (and there are tons of those sites) it's quite another to know how to drive traffic to it.

      In other words you have no idea. "PPC" means "Pay Per Click". Nothing to do with profit margins or whatever you think it is he's talking about.

      Mal,

      I don't understand your comment. Traffic can be easily purchased. But the profit margin of what you're selling has to be high enough to cover the cost of the traffic so you can make a profit. That's what I was talking about -- and that's what Max responded to.

      He meant he didn't know if his friend was using PPC. Then he agreed that the margins were probably high enough to profit when using it.

      Maybe you just misunderstood?

      John
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  • Profile picture of the author ToryBorysewicz
    Banned
    Great share. Thanks for teaching me something new today.
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  • Profile picture of the author bizgrower
    Seriously good share.

    It also increases your chances of having a client that
    you get along with. lol
    Signature

    "If you think you're the smartest person in the room, then you're probably in the wrong room."

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  • Profile picture of the author gjabiz
    Originally Posted by max5ty View Post

    Copywriters have an advantage...they know how to write ads that sell a boatload of products.

    Best wishes.
    Thanks max5ty for the idea stimulator. Let me toss out a few more, OK?

    My top 10 list for businesses I'd get into today, based on my 53 years of Biz-Op.

    1-Publishing Hotsheets, which are short, sweet and TIMELY.
    2- Food Popcorn cheapest food on the planet with very high profits.
    3- Cleaning Small businesses have huge turn over in this
    4- Auto Detailing, cleaning headlights with money/ towing
    5- Homes State of the art "roto rooting" yea, it's tradmarked, but cleaning drains doesn't give you a good picture
    6- Pets personalized treats (I've developed products, supplements are good too)
    7- Biz advisor most small businesses are not good at most biz things
    8- Entertainment talent agency
    9- Jewelry birthstones, lucky charms
    10- cosmetics new skin cream

    Now this is an overview, but, like max5ty sez, you can write copy for all of these things and develop some terrific income. Case study:

    Stopped at gas station this morning, saw they carry popcorn, talked to mgr, tells me he ordered a test sample, sold out and reordered...has never met anyone, all done via email.

    Most stores have what is known as Rack-Jobbers, those guys who come in once a week and replenish the bread, coke, beer, etc. Most big companies use people to do this. Popcorn man is doing it via mail. no face to face, just a sample kit sent free and re-orders with payment for past racks, he takes their word on sales. Not what I'd do, but I'm a cynic.

    A couple of years ago a fellow started a BALLOON route with small bakeries and did very well, started expanding by the written word, postcards with pics were his favorite choice. Speaking of balloons, my old friend, Charles Prosper has made a fortune selling all things balloons for a couple of decades, almost all of his business is done remotely...because,

    he knows how to sell in Print (or internet).

    YOU, as a copy student, possibly even a paid writer, have such an advantage...but the problem is...very few people with real life experiences are showing the vast opportunity your skills will allow you.

    Writers write.

    Copywriters sell baby sell. And don't worry about the next "client".

    Thanks again Max5ty for the start of what could be a very useful thread.

    gjabiz

    PS. As I've stated before, publishing is my #1, but TOLL POSITIONS is the absolute best opportunity I've uncovered in the last 53 years.
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    • Profile picture of the author Johnny12345
      Originally Posted by gjabiz View Post

      PS. As I've stated before, publishing is my #1, but TOLL POSITIONS is the absolute best opportunity I've uncovered in the last 53 years.

      gjabiz,

      Is Bob Serling sort of the "king" of toll gates? I know he had a very expensive course about doing it. He's the first guy I ever heard talk about it (but I know others are doing it, too).

      John
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      • Profile picture of the author gjabiz
        Here are four books I refer people to who are interested in this sort of thing...you have to google, I'm too lazy to post full titles...but,

        Dan Kennedy make a million with your idea
        Harvey Reese on licensing
        Stephen Key on the subject
        from NOLO, the Richard Stim book includes a cd with forms

        These are a good starting point. Bob S. as mentioned, specializes in ( I believe) licensing your ads or your copy, but, I don't have his course and I believe him to have toll position expertise.

        On a different note, when Joe Karbo was mentoring me in S. CA, he showed me the HOTSHEETS biz, which included specialty newsletters too. Joe got a weekly boating and yacht report every week he paid 20 bux a week for, said about 100 people subscribed. I suggested he publish it, he laughed at me and said "Alex, it would cost me 10,000 dollars of my time to make that 2 grand".

        Joe also got me to subscribe to Jerry Buchanan's TOWER club, Hubert Simon's newsletter and several other HOTSHEETS

        For the uninitiated, the difference between a HOTSHEET and a tip sheet is time. HOTSHEETS have an expiration date...how to adjust a carburetor on a 65 dodge stays the same...a weekly lottery forecast expires. SEE?

        On another different note, Mr. Buchholzer, another mentor owned the popcorn stand at Chapel Hill Mall which he built and it took in over 100,000 a year in CASH, not bad for a little sideline biz.

        As for the OP, writer's write cause it is just like breathing...they have to. Writer's who get paid to write, write what people will pay for.

        Using the OP, a motivated copywriter could go to the site listed, hit the link to dropshippers, find a product or two and write a promotion...then figure out how to reach the market...

        The big secret not mentioned here very often...how to intersect with the prospect at the right time and place...learn that, and you have the "wherewithal" to make the dough.

        gjabiz

        PS. Joe was using only the USPS snail mail and a phone...not even faxes were around then...you guys and gals have such a huge advantage...write and keep writing...but know why you are doing and what results you want.

        Also, Joe rec'd HOTSHEETS on closeouts, surplus...a biz he was in too. This was before Big Lots, dollar stores and is still a viable business...isn't there a warrior that sells a report on surplus? Can't remember who, but the secret is to have buyers lined up before you buy. Joe used the phone to find surplus items, and sold them to buyers for a profit, ain't rocket science.



        Originally Posted by Johnny12345 View Post

        gjabiz,

        Is Bob Serling sort of the "king" of toll gates? I know he had a very expensive course about doing it. He's the first guy I ever heard talk about it (but I know others are doing it, too).

        John
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  • Profile picture of the author shawnlebrun
    It really all comes down to the wherewithal to find a decent niche, find the funding for it, and then making it come to life.

    2 people can look at the same exact thing. One thinks "wow, what a great opportunity"

    the other thinks "that will never fly... already been done"

    It really comes down to mindset, willingness to take action, and then never giving up until you either make it or don't.

    Because the honest reality is, any niche COULD be a winner.

    Sunglass Hut is all sunglasses.

    We have 2 booming stores in our state that sell nothing but popcorn. And they're growing so fast they can't keep stock.

    Orange Leaf and Red Mango is just self-serve yogurt... and both are booming where I live.

    Seriously, any product can be a winner. Any... if you have the RIGHT business mind and the willingness to never quit.

    Where I might look at watches and yawn... there's a guy in our mall selling millions of dollars worth.

    Any product can be a winner, and yet that same product can be a dud. it's all about the person doing the business... how they market it and position it, how they fund it and finance it, and how they decide to run it.
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    • Profile picture of the author gjabiz
      Originally Posted by shawnlebrun View Post

      It really all comes down to the wherewithal to find a decent niche, find the funding for it, and then making it come to life.

      Any product can be a winner, and yet that same product can be a dud. it's all about the person doing the business... how they market it and position it, how they fund it and finance it, and how they decide to run it.
      Really SHAWN?

      That is what it comes down to? The wherewithal? Find a decent niche but "ANY PRODUCT" CAN BE A WINNER?

      Find the funding?

      Where does the copy come in?

      I don't believe any product can be a winner. That is nonsense.

      Do agree it comes down to mindset...and follow through.

      max5ty is talking about using writing skills to promote products. My opinion is your post is pablum for the babes on board. You have real world experience, why not offer that up instead of this insipid nonsense, OK?

      gjabiz

      PS. Maybe this kind of drivel is best served in the "mind warriors" sub forum???
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      • Profile picture of the author shawnlebrun
        Originally Posted by gjabiz View Post

        Really SHAWN?

        That is what it comes down to? The wherewithal? Find a decent niche but "ANY PRODUCT" CAN BE A WINNER?

        Find the funding?

        Where does the copy come in?

        I don't believe any product can be a winner. That is nonsense.

        Do agree it comes down to mindset...and follow through.

        max5ty is talking about using writing skills to promote products. My opinion is your post is pablum for the babes on board. You have real world experience, why not offer that up instead of this insipid nonsense, OK?

        gjabiz

        PS. Maybe this kind of drivel is best served in the "mind warriors" sub forum???
        The fact is... some products sell themselves.

        Copy just isn't needed... and in some cases, can even hurt the sale.

        I believe it was Ford motor company that found this out... they ran tests to determine that their ads actually UNSOLD their vehicles.

        Heck, I'm a copywriter and I'll be the first to admit that often times, the product IS what does the selling.

        I "used" to think that copy was the most important aspect of a business... but then I've been in business long enough to realize it's not. It's just a piece.

        So yes, I stand behind my saying that ANY product can be a winner.

        The popcorn store I wrote about... zero copy and yet they're doing millions in revenue.

        Originally Posted by gjabiz View Post


        1-Publishing Hotsheets, which are short, sweet and TIMELY.
        2- Food Popcorn cheapest food on the planet with very high profits.
        3- Cleaning Small businesses have huge turn over in this
        4- Auto Detailing, cleaning headlights with money/ towing
        5- Homes State of the art "roto rooting" yea, it's tradmarked, but cleaning drains doesn't give you a good picture
        6- Pets personalized treats (I've developed products, supplements are good too)
        7- Biz advisor most small businesses are not good at most biz things
        8- Entertainment talent agency
        9- Jewelry birthstones, lucky charms
        10- cosmetics new skin cream
        You honestly think it's the COPY that sells these products?

        Hell, I can name 50 successful businesses in my home town, in the mall, that sells millions in products without copy.

        And yeah, I'd say this belongs in the copy forum because it takes some smart business sense to know WHEN copy isn't the most important aspect in some offers.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
    I agree with Shawn.

    In more cases than not...

    It's the person - not the product - that determines whether a campaign is successful or not.

    That being said (and before I get hung...)

    Let's just have this conversation assuming we're all talking about quality products.

    Mark

    P.S. Funding and right action fall into place - when you take the steps that reveal them.

    P.P.S. Drivel? Marketing and mindset are glued together like sticky sex.
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    • Profile picture of the author gjabiz
      Mark,

      The OP was and is about making money with WRITING skills, this being a copy forum and all. Copywriting is or can be a part of marketing. Mindset? What is that to the copywriter seeking to make money by selling a product? Don't see the glue there, maybe you can enlighten us, eh?

      What is a quality product? Sun glasses that sell for 10 bux vs. the same product with a designer label on it which sells for 125.00?

      Quality is, perhaps, determined by testing...although if you position your product as the superior brand, you may be deemed the product of quality in the marketplace. Such things as "seals" from Better Homes and Garden" and such.

      Is an astrological forecast a quality product? The guy making six figures a year selling them sure thinks so.

      This forum is about (or should be) helping new and old copywriters with some ideas on the subject, born of experience and tested and proven in the trenches.

      It seems to me, an OPINION, it is more about posting, getting numbers and trying to establish some cred so as to market to the masses of Warriors.

      Drivel, like quality, may be in the minds of the reader. Shawn's a big boy, but I'm sure he appreciates you coming to his defense.

      Can you get back to discussing WRITING copy to sell products, which I think many people would appreciate, don't you?

      gjabiz

      Originally Posted by Mark Pescetti View Post

      I agree with Shawn.

      In more cases than not...

      It's the person - not the product - that determines whether a campaign is successful or not.

      That being said (and before I get hung...)

      Let's just have this conversation assuming we're all talking about quality products.

      Mark

      P.S. Funding and right action fall into place - when you take the steps that reveal them.

      P.P.S. Drivel? Marketing and mindset are glued together like sticky sex.
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      • Profile picture of the author Mark Pescetti
        Originally Posted by gjabiz View Post

        Mark,

        The OP was and is about making money with WRITING skills, this being a copy forum and all. Copywriting is or can be a part of marketing. Mindset? What is that to the copywriter seeking to make money by selling a product? Don't see the glue there, maybe you can enlighten us, eh?
        What inspires a copywriter to sell a product?

        What makes him or her take action?

        If it's a newer copywriter - who has only had minimal success selling, don't you think he or she is going to experience discomfort by coming out of pocket and selling something - based on the success of their copy?

        Mindset.

        Most copywriters never even see a glimpse of their real potential because giving into fear of failure.

        It's take the right mindset (or attitude) to overcome the noise in the head to reach that place of empowered success.

        Look at Bob Proctor (from The Secret.)

        He's preaching Law of Attraction, which is a mindset perspective, right?

        But look at his action.

        He sends out 5+ emails a day - leading people to sales letters and VSLs. He's a mindset leader, yet one of the biggest pimps around.

        Direct response and the right mindset are the perfect marriage.

        Originally Posted by gjabiz View Post

        What is a quality product? Sun glasses that sell for 10 bux vs. the same product with a designer label on it which sells for 125.00?

        Quality is, perhaps, determined by testing...although if you position your product as the superior brand, you may be deemed the product of quality in the marketplace. Such things as "seals" from Better Homes and Garden" and such.

        Is an astrological forecast a quality product? The guy making six figures a year selling them sure thinks so.

        This forum is about (or should be) helping new and old copywriters with some ideas on the subject, born of experience and tested and proven in the trenches.

        It seems to me, an OPINION, it is more about posting, getting numbers and trying to establish some cred so as to market to the masses of Warriors.

        Drivel, like quality, may be in the minds of the reader. Shawn's a big boy, but I'm sure he appreciates you coming to his defense.

        Can you get back to discussing WRITING copy to sell products, which I think many people would appreciate, don't you?

        gjabiz
        Agreed.

        It's all about testing.

        And I'm not coming to Shawn's defense.

        It's just something I'm passionate about.

        Mark
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  • Profile picture of the author Andrew Gould
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    Andrew Gould

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  • Profile picture of the author max5ty
    @gjabiz...thanks for the interesting post.

    Some super great ideas.

    Never knew popcorn could be so profitable...I can see how it could be though, and obviously it's working. Thanks for that story.

    I remember back in the late 80s' some guy was telling me about some new idea he was gonna try. Something about 900 numbers. The whole idea sounded kinda crazy to me...but we know how profitable that idea was.

    I try not to dismiss any idea anymore, even if it sounds like a dead end, until I spend some time and explore it further. Found out not everything yanks my chain, but often that idea leads to another then another...always important to stay curious. Curiosity leads to the heavens opening and new ideas and money raining down.

    I always thought your headlight cleaning system was a no brainer for anyone that needed to start making some fast cash. It's drop dead easy and the supply of eager customers is limitless.

    Thanks again for letting us in on some of the great things you've found out during your many years of experience.

    @Shawn...I agree there are products that sell in the millions without any copy being written for them.

    Often those products have had millions of dollars of support behind them. Not always, but a lot of times.

    My post was aimed towards those who had the ability to write great ads (sales letters etc.).

    When you are able to sell with words, you can sell virtually anything. You can start with very little and grow it into an empire.

    Something complicated for most, but an advantage for copywriters...the ability to tell a good story, make an irresistible offer...

    A good copywriter, with the proper skills has the ability to take a product and get it up to the million dollar club just by sitting in their Lazy Boy chair, or as someone once said, "Sitting at the kitchen table in their underwear" and writing.

    Thanks for the feedback.

    P.S. I ran out of thanks on my thanker. I'll catch up later.
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  • Profile picture of the author MJ Collins
    I'm just starting with Dan Kennedy's The Ultimate Sales Letter. Will probably finish it in a day or so. It's a real page turner.
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    attracted to shiny objects
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  • Profile picture of the author RogozRazvan
    It's a good idea but it's emotional estimation.

    The copy itself is just a part of the entire process. It may be a small part, a big one, but there are other things involved too.

    Things like finding a reliable shipping method, the quality of the products, the legal stuff involved, etc.

    From what I've seen, the big sellers are not so much concerned on conversion (since all their advertising brought them a positive ROI) but rather the logistical aspect - where to store 5000 boxes, how to ship them every day, who is going to answer the phone and so on.
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    • Profile picture of the author max5ty
      Originally Posted by RogozRazvan View Post

      It's a good idea but it's emotional estimation.

      The copy itself is just a part of the entire process. It may be a small part, a big one, but there are other things involved too.

      Things like finding a reliable shipping method, the quality of the products, the legal stuff involved, etc.

      From what I've seen, the big sellers are not so much concerned on conversion (since all their advertising brought them a positive ROI) but rather the logistical aspect - where to store 5000 boxes, how to ship them every day, who is going to answer the phone and so on.
      Sounds like a true case of analysis paralysis.

      Vicky lives in a 1984 Dodge van under a bridge in Seattle Washington.

      Couple weeks ago she came up with an idea.

      Was a simple idea.

      Problem is, Vicky has a problem.

      She over analysis everything. She starts from where she's at with her plan and works her way right to the final result. From having nothing to owning an empire.

      How to deal with all the employees? She doesn't have the slightest clue how to set up a Human Resources Department.

      What about the massive taxes she'll have to pay? Heck, she says, "I don't know anything about the tax laws." Tax shelters, dividends...write offs...

      Lawsuits. Geez, she thinks, most big companies have staff attorneys to handle the legal matters. That's another expense.

      Shipping thousands and thousands of products. Golly, she thinks, that would take a whole department itself...not to speak of the expenses involved in warehousing.

      Crap, what about customer service? Returns. That's another whole department she'll have to have.

      Then there's the whole IPO thing when the company goes public. She doesn't know squat about the stock market.

      It's all too overwhelming she thinks as she stares out the van window.

      Analysis paralysis.

      If you start over analysing an idea too long, you'll start to analyse things out of context.

      They'll be out of context because you're not seeing the steps in the process that created the result.

      Anyone in business will tell you, there's no way to predict things that come along on a daily basis...so, how can you deal with the end result when you haven't yet dealt with all the little issues that add up to the big result?

      Start where you're at and begin taking steps to get to where you want to go...even if they're tiny little steps.

      The little steps prepare you for the big steps.

      So, when you start talking about 5000 boxes, and warehouse space...it tells me you're worrying about something you don't even need to deal with right now. You're not there yet.

      If you were, 5000 boxes wouldn't be a worry because you'd have already dealt with the little steps along the way that got you to 5000 boxes.

      Don't try and deal with an empire, while you're still living under a bridge.
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      • Profile picture of the author RogozRazvan
        Look, Max, I haven't said you are wrong.

        You are right. You are a very wise entrepreneur.

        I've said that copywriting is a part of the equation. The entire conversion system is just a part of it. The only people earning money only from copywriting, from the conversion, are the copywriters who are paid on royalty.

        The entrepreneur needs to deal with other issues too. Every week, I have to take care of the books. I have to empty my inbox. I need to call some people to make sure everything is alright.

        I don't have those 5000 boxes. I've worked with someone who does. And even if the marketing machine was working out great, he was frustrated because the shipping services were amateurish in nature. Ironically, they are supposed to be the best around.

        So the order was to be shipped as in tomorrow and no one came to pick up the order. This means calling about 100 clients explaining them why the shipment will be delayed, since they were promised that it's going to get there the next business day.

        That's the entire point. You are right. Just don't make it only about copywriting because it's not. I'm a copywriter and I know it's not.
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        • Profile picture of the author max5ty
          Originally Posted by RogozRazvan View Post

          Look, Max, I haven't said you are wrong.

          You are right. You are a very wise entrepreneur.

          I've said that copywriting is a part of the equation. The entire conversion system is just a part of it. The only people earning money only from copywriting, from the conversion, are the copywriters who are paid on royalty.

          The entrepreneur needs to deal with other issues too. Every week, I have to take care of the books. I have to empty my inbox. I need to call some people to make sure everything is alright.

          I don't have those 5000 boxes. I've worked with someone who does. And even if the marketing machine was working out great, he was frustrated because the shipping services were amateurish in nature. Ironically, they are supposed to be the best around.

          So the order was to be shipped as in tomorrow and no one came to pick up the order. This means calling about 100 clients explaining them why the shipment will be delayed, since they were promised that it's going to get there the next business day.

          That's the entire point. You are right. Just don't make it only about copywriting because it's not. I'm a copywriter and I know it's not.
          I'm failing to understand your point.

          The product I gave an example of can be drop shipped. Thus, the need to worry about warehouse space and shipping is avoided.

          If you're saying there are other things to deal with besides copywriting...of course. Problem solving is always needed in any business endeavor.

          The post was about copywriters coming up a product to sell.

          A "How to get started" in a nutshell kind of thing...not a "Hey, look out for the mud puddles when it starts to rain money" kind of thing.

          Anyways, thanks for your feedback.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason_V
    When I read this post, I couldn't help but think about "The Amish Fireplaces"

    Guy was a genius. He took average ordinary electric heaters that you could buy at any hardware or big box store for under $30-$50 and now sells them at up to $400 per pop to the tune of millions in annual sales.

    How was this accomplished?

    Simple every day product, small twist, and most important, clever copywriting and advertising.
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    "When you do something exactly wrong, you always turn up something."
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    • Profile picture of the author gjabiz
      Originally Posted by Jason_V View Post

      When I read this post, I couldn't help but think about "The Amish Fireplaces"

      Guy was a genius.
      More like IS, not was.


      There was a whole line of Amish made products in development when this took off. It was to be direct competition with the EDENPURE line and it is. The EdenPure heater has sold over a billion dollars. The Amish heater has sold several hundred millions. Lesson?

      Americans get cold and don't want to move to FL or AZ until they are at least 101.

      This "genius" religiously reads the Sunday paper and goes over the TARGET ads with a fine tooth comb looking for products to market. He believes (as he spoke to me) TARGET has the best buyers in the biz with their hands correctly on the pulse of
      American buyers.

      Want to write on something? Search your local TARGET. Simple eh?

      gjabiz
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      • Originally Posted by gjabiz View Post


        This "genius" religiously reads the Sunday paper and goes over the TARGET ads with a fine tooth comb looking for products to market. He believes (as he spoke to me) TARGET has the best buyers in the biz with their hands correctly on the pulse of
        American buyers.

        Want to write on something? Search your local TARGET. Simple eh?

        gjabiz
        Good one. You might even want to sell to Target eventually. Here is how one lady did it with pure persistence.

        How We Landed on Target's Shelves - CBS News
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        Marketing is not a battle of products. It is a battle of perceptions.
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  • Profile picture of the author Sean Fry
    You guys don't even have to open up a wholesale account. There's an endless amount of stuff you can promote as an affiliate. That's what I do.

    Build up enough sites promoting stuff as an affiliate and you'll never have to write for another client again. Create your own offers as well.
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  • Profile picture of the author Raymond Duke
    To add some content to this thread...

    Manufacturers, Suppliers, Exporters & Importers from the world's largest online B2B marketplace-Alibaba.com is the number 1 e-commerce site. It's based on China. It's bigger than Amazon. You can find pretty much anything on it for cheap.

    Here is a post from a friend of mine: How You Can Make Big Money Importing From China – The Rise and Fall of My Empire… It's about building a drop-shipping business. He made $150,000 selling airsoft guns... while being 13-16 years old. Not bad for a pup, right? In that post he gives step by step instructions for how to do it.
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    • Profile picture of the author max5ty
      Originally Posted by Raymond Duke View Post

      To add some content to this thread...

      Manufacturers, Suppliers, Exporters & Importers from the world's largest online B2B marketplace-Alibaba.com is the number 1 e-commerce site. It's based on China. It's bigger than Amazon. You can find pretty much anything on it for cheap.

      Here is a post from a friend of mine: How You Can Make Big Money Importing From China - The Rise and Fall of My Empire... It's about building a drop-shipping business. He made $150,000 selling airsoft guns... while being 13-16 years old. Not bad for a pup, right? In that post he gives step by step instructions for how to do it.
      Well, since you bumped this thread...

      and I usually have about a 24 hour interest in the threads I post, I'll make an exception.

      Let me tell you what my friend is working on now.

      She bought a whole semi trailer load of diapers and rented a corner from a quick change oil place...she advertised in the local paper and on the raido.

      She paid something like $8,000 for the trailer load and sold it for somewhere around $24,000.

      Probably a net of about $13,000 after advertising fees.

      Now...she's got a trailer of bunk beds coming. She paid like $30 a piece for them and they sell for around $200.

      I can't even begin to tell you how much you can make if you use your head.

      Don't know about the whole China import thing...but I'll check out your link. Thanks.

      Saw a good deal that was open for bid on a trailer load of tires...

      wow.

      Too many options for a 24 hour day.
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